The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Sixth Brigade, Army of the Potomac

Scott's Squadron Cavalry

Albemarle Light Horse arrived at Manassas Junction, Virginia, 11 May, 1861, and Prince William Cavalry 27 May, 1861. Mustered in Confederate service for one year dated 1 July, 1861. Albemarle Light Horse stationed at Camp Wigfall, between Manassas Junction and Union Mills Ford, on the Bull Run River, and Prince William Cavalry at Davis'Ford, on the Occuquan River, 21 July, 1861

CAPTAIN J SCOTT
Captain J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.201, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861, and was assigned to command Scott's Squadron Cavalry, by Special Orders No.70, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 27 June, 1861.

Company K Albemarle Light Horse, Thirtieth Virginia Cavalry: CAPT. E DAVIS
The company was accepted in state service at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 11 May, 1861, and was mustered in state service for one year at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, by Lieutenant Colonel J B Strange, 19th Virginia Infantry, on 13 May, 1861. The company was assigned to the 30th Virginia Cavalry, Company K, by Special Orders No.68, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 26 June, 1861, and to Brigadier General T H Holmes, Confederate States Army, at Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 July, 1861, and (See 30th Virginia Cavalry).
Unlettered Company Prince William Cavalry: CAPT. W W THORNTON
The company was accepted in state service at Brentsville, Prince William County, Virginia, on 23 April, 1861, and was ordered to Safford's Farm, near Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, the same day. The company was mustered in state service for one year at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 28 May, 1861, and was assigned to the 4th Virginia Cavalry, Company A, by Special Orders No.248, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 4 September, 1861 (See the 17th Virginia Infantry).

Sources

"Our informant at the Manassas Junction during the whole of Monday, being detained by difficulties in procuring the necessary passes. There were 3,000 troops, largely South Carolinians. The Prince William county cavalry battalion was there."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 30 May, 1861 - Affairs at the South

"On Friday night at 9 P.M. the Prince William Cavalry burned the toll bridge over the Occoquan River (sixteen miles from Alexandria) to the water's edge - injuring Messrs. Janey, its owners, to the extent of $8,000."

The Cincinnati Daily Press, 31 May, 1861

"Four companies of the First Regiment of Virginia Volunteers were at Fairfax Court-House on Monday evening, besides the Warrenton Rifles and five Cavalry Companies, viz.; Ball's, Chesterfield corps; Wickham's, (Hanover,) Prince William, Rappahannock and Black Horse Cavalry, of Fauquier. It was thought probable that Col. Maxcy Gregg's South Carolinians would take the place of the Richmond companies, and permit them to rejoin their Regiment at Manassas Junction."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 19 June, 1861 - Military

"Our company returned from Occoquan on Friday before the great fight and were immediately sent to meet General Holmes' Brigade, which was advancing from Fredericksburg."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 29 July, 1861 - The pursuit at Manassas

"It was uniformed with grey cloth made at Kelly's Mills, in Culpepper County. The uniform consisted of a frock coat with one row of buttons up the front and one each side, connecting at the top with a gold lave V. Pants with yellow stripes, black hats with black plumes on the left side held up with crossed sabres, and a shield with the letters 'P.W.C.' in front - a plain neat uniform in which the most insignificant must look his best; and as they trotted off by fours with the fine-looking, genial captain and his kinsman at their head, there were none but admiring eyes and but few dry ones in the old town which had known and loved most of them from childhood to manhood."

The Confederate Veteran, Volume 15: History of the Prince William Cavalry, pp353-54, by Mrs M R Barlow, Manassas, Virginia

"It was my duty to watch the right of our line, and the two companies of cavalry on that flank, Eugene Davis' and W. W. Thornton's companies of Virginia cavalry, were placed under my command, and Captain John Scott was assigned to the immediate command of them."

"Captain W. W. Thornton's company of cavalry had been again attached to my command and subsequently, in the month of September, a battery of Virginia artillery under Captain Holman reported to me. In the latter part of August, General Longstreet, who had command of the advanced forces at Fairfax Court-House, threw forward a small force of infantry and cavalry and established strong pickets at Mason's and Munson's Hills, in close proximity to the enemy's main line on the south of the Potomac."

Lieutenant General Jubal Anderson Early C.S.A.: Autobiographical sketch and narrative of the War Between the States, with notes by Jubal Anderson Early

"On July 18, Major John Scott, commanding the post at Davis' House, received orders to have his command, Davis' and Adams' companies, fed, saddled and extra rations issued by 8 o'clock. Private Minor wrote, We left Occoquan Thursday evening (I mean by we, our troop and the Prince William), and were very nearly cut off by 400 of the enemy. One of the Wise dragoons informed us that they were on our road about a mile in front of us; we turned off, went around them and got here safely… The Prince William (troop) were left to guard Davis' Ford and we came on to Camp Wigfall."

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series: Second Virginia Cavalry, First Edition, No.990 of 1000, by R J Driver, Jr. & H E Howard

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 69, Serial No.81: Record of events for Fourth Virginia Cavalry, April 1861-November 1864, edited by James B Hewett

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series: Fourth Virginia Cavalry, Second Edition, by K L Stiles

A guide to Virginia military organisations 1861–1865, Revised Second Edition by I A Wallace, Jr.

Notes

Albemarle Light Horse

The Albemarle Light Horse was accepted in state service at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 11 May, 1861.

Charlottesville, Albemarle County, to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, 11 & 13 May, 1861: The Albemarle Light Horse was ordered to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 11 May, 1861, and was stationed at Camp Henry, near Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 13 May, 1861.

Mustered in one year, Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, 13 May, 1861: The Albemarle Light Horse was mustered in state service for one year at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, by Lieutenant Colonel J B Strange, 19th Virginia Infantry, on 13 May, 1861 (See the 19th Virginia Infantry).

Return of troops stationed at Camp Henry, near Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, 20 May, 1861: The Albemarle Light Horse was stationed at Camp Henry, near Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, 20 May, 1861.

Note: The Albemarle Light Horse, Powhatan Troop, and Madison Cavalry were stationed at Freeman's House, near Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 21 May, 1861.

Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 24-25 May, 1861: The Albemarle Light Horse was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 24 May, 1861, and was accompanied by the Powhatan Troop (See Lay's Squadron Cavalry). The company arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, via Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, in the evening on 25 May, 1861.

Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, & Manassas Junction, Virginia, 31 May & 1 June, 1861: The Albermarle Light Horse and the Wise Dragoons were ordered to Bethel Church, Prince William County, Virginia, to establish a courier line between Dumfries, Prince William County, and Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 31 May, 1861, but the order was countermanded and the Albermarle Light Horse established a courier line between Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, and Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 1 June, 1861.

Special Orders No.14, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 9 June, 1861: The Powhatan Troop and the Albemarle Light Horse, under the command of Captain J F Lay, Powhatan Troop, were assigned to Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.14, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 9 June, 1861.

Note: Two men of the Albemarle Light Horse were assigned as couriers to Captain R T W Duke, 19th Virginia Infantry, Company B, at Union Mills Ford, on the Bull Run River, and two to the 2nd South Carolina Infantry at Camp Beauregard or Kershaw, near Mitchell's Ford, on the Bull Run River, on 9 June, 1861.

Manassas Junction to Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, 16 June, 1861: The Albermarle Light Horse was ordered to Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.37, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 15 June, 1861, and arrived via Bacon Race and Bethel Churches, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 June, 1861.

Note: The Wise Dragoons was stationed at the intersection of the Telegraphic and the Occoquon Roads near Occoquon, Prince William County, Virginia, between 5 and 15 June, 1861, and the Albermarle Light Horse was assigned to the Sixth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Colonel J A Early, 24th Virginia Infantry, by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861 (See Lays Squadron Cavalry).

Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince Wiliam County, Virginia, 27 June, 1861: Major J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the Albermarle Light Horse and the Prince William Cavalry stationed at Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince Wiliam County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.70, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 27 June, 1861.

Note: The Albermarle Light Horse was assigned to the 30th Virginia Cavalry by Special Orders No.68, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 26 June, 1861.

Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, 9 July, 1861: The Albermarle Light Horse and the Prince William Cavalry were stationed at Camp Scott, Davis' House, near Payne's Store, Prince Wiliam County, Virginia, under the command of Major J Scott, on 9 July, 1861, and were assigned to guard the Potomac River between Occoquan and Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, between 9 and 18 July, 1861.

Occoquan, Prince William County, to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 18 July, 1861: The Albermarle Light Horse, under the command of Captain J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, at 8 PM on 18 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the evening the same day (See the Reserve Brigade, Army of the Potomac).

Manassas Junction, Virginia, to Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, 19-20 July, 1861: The Albermarle Light Horse, under the command of Captain J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was ordered to Dumfries via Brentsville, Prince William County, Virginia, on 19 July, 1861, and was assigned to Brigadier General T H Holmes , Confederate States Army, in the evening the same day (See the Reserve Brigade, Army of the Potomac). The company arrived at Camp Wigfall, on McLean's Farm, near the intersection of Union Mills and Hooe's Hill Roads, in the morning on 20 July, 1861, and was assigned as a reserve to the Second Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Brigadier General R S Ewell, at Union Mills Ford, on the Bull Run River, on 21 July, 1861 (See the Second Brigade, Army of the Potomac).

After the first battle of Manassas the Albermarle Light Horse arrived at Camp Wigfall, between Manassas Junction and Union Mills Ford, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 22 July, 1861.

Prince William Cavalry

The Prince William Cavalry was accepted in state service at Brentsville, Prince Wiliam County, Virginia, on 23 April, 1861, and was ordered to Safford's Farm, between Greenwood Courthouse and Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, the same day.

Safford's Farm, between Greenwood Courthouse & Occoquan, to Brentsville, Prince William County, Virginia, 15 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Brentsville, Prince William County, Virginia, on 15 May, 1861.

Brentsville to Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, 20 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, to guard the roads and landings on the Potomac River on 20 May, 1861.

Occoquan, Prince William County, to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 24-25 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to burn the toll bridge over the Occoquan River and proceed to Manassas Junction, Virginia, at 9 PM on 24 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 25 May, 1861.

Manassas Junction to Bacon Race Church, near Maple Valley, Prince William County, Virginia, 25 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Bacon Race Church, near Maple Valley, Prince William County, Virginia, on 25 May, 1861, and arrived the same day.

Bacon Race Church, near Maple Valley, Prince William County, to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 26-27 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 26 May, 1861, and arrived in the morning on 27 May, 1861.

Manassas Junction to Centreville & Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 27 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virgina, at 10 AM on 27 May, 1861, and was accompanied by Brigadier General M L Bonham. The company was ordered to Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the evening the same day (See the 1st South Carolina Infantry).

Mustered in one year, Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 28 May, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was mustered in state service for one year at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 28 May, 1861 (See the 17th Virginia Infantry).

Skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1 June, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was engaged in a skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, between 3 and 4 AM on 1 June, 1861 (See the Skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse).

Note: The Prince William Cavalry, the Rappahannock Cavalry, and the Warrenton Rifles were stationed at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel R S Ewell, Confederate States Army, on 1 June, 1861 (See Jenifer's Battalion Cavalry).

General Orders No.25, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, 8 June, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was assigned to the Confederate States by General Orders No.25, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 8 June, 1861, and was accepted in Confederate service on 1 July, 1861.

Note: The Prince William Cavalry, the Hanover Light Dragoons, the Chesterfield Light Dragoons, Company B; the Rappahannock Cavalry, and the Black Horse Troop, were stationed at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861.

Fairfax Courthouse to Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, 21 June, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the morning on 21 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the Rappahannock Cavalry.

Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 23 June, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.62, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 23 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the Rappahannock Cavalry.

Note: The Prince William Cavalry and the Rappahannock Cavalry were stationed at Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 23 June, 1861.

Manassas Junction to Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, 24 June, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was ordered to Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861.

Note: The Prince William Cavalry was assigned to the Sixth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861.

Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince Wiliam County, Virginia, Captain J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, 27 June, 1861: Captain J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the Albermarle Light Horse and the Prince William Cavalry stationed at Payne's Store, near Occoquan, Prince Wiliam County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.70, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 27 June, 1861.

Note: The Prince William Cavalry was stationed at Camp Pryor, near the intersection of Davis' Ford Road and the Spring's and Bland's Fords Roads, in the evening on 4 July, 1861.

Occoquan, Prince William County, Virginia, 9 July, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry and the Albermarle Light Horse were stationed at Camp Scott, Davis' House, near Payne's Store, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Captain J Scott, cavalry, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and were assigned to guard the Potomac River between Occoquan and Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, between 9 and 18 July, 1861.

Davis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, Virginia, 18 July, 1861: The Prince William Cavalry was assigned to guard Davis' Ford, on Cedar Run, in the evening on 18 July, 1861, and did not participate in the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861.

The Prince William Cavalry was assigned to the 4th Virginia Cavalry, Company A, under the command of Colonel B H Robertson, by Special Orders No.248, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 4 September, 1861, and was ordered to rendezvous at Sangster's Crossroads, Prince William County, Virginia, on 19 September 1861.

Disbanded at Lynchburg, Virginia, 11 April, 1865: The 2nd Virginia Cavalry and the 4th Virginia Cavalry were disbanded at Lynchburg, Virginia, on 11 April, 1865.

Colonel J A Early, 24th Virginia Infantry, Sixth Brigade, Army of the Potomac: Colonel J A Early, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command Camp Davis, the Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, on 16 May, 1861, and organised the 24th Virginia Infantry, the 28th Virginia Infantry, and the 30th Virginia Cavalry on 17 May, 1861. He was appointed brigadier general, Confederate States Army, on 28 August, 1861, dated 21 July, 1861.

Note: The 24th Virginia Infantry, the 5th North Carolina State Troops and the 13th North Carolina Infantry, and the Prince William Cavalry were assigned to the Sixth Brigade, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Brigadier General J A Early, on 25 July, 1861. The Fluvanna Artillery No.1, under the command of Captain W H Holman, was assigned to the Sixth Brigade, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, on 3 September, 1861.

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.109: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp555-558
Colonel J Early, Sixth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, dated 1 August, 1861