The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Department of Washington

Colonel E F Jones, 6th Massachusetts Infantry

Colonel E F Jones, 6th Massachusetts Infantry

Three Months' Volunteers

Inspector General & Colonel J K F Mansfield, United States Army

Maine

First Maine Infantry

Col. N J Jackson

The 1st Maine Infantry was accepted in state service for two years at Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, on 28 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st Maine Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, 3 May, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, by Captain J W T Gardner, 1st United States Dragoons, Company B, on 3 May, 1861.

Organisation of 1st Maine Infantry, 3 May, 1861: Colonel N J Jackson, Lieutenant Colonel A Witham, Major G G Bailey; Company A, Portland Light Infantry, Captain G W Tukey; Company B, Portland Mechanic Blues, Captain C Walker; Company C, Portland Light Guards, Captain M R Fressenden; Company D, Portland Light Corps, Captain C H Meserve; Company E, Portland Rifle Guards No.1, Captain W M Shaw; Company F, Lewiston Light Infantry, Captain J T Stevens; Company G, Norway Light Infantry, Captain G L Beal; Company H, Auburn Artilley, Captain C H Emerson; Company I, Portland Rifle Guards No.2, Captain W M Quimby; Company K, Lewiston Zouaves, Captain S B Osgood

Portland to Westbrook, near Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, 8 May, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry was ordered to Westbrook, near Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, at 4 PM on 8 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Washburn, Westbrook, near Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, the same day.

Westbrook, near Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 1-2 June, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry (779) was ordered to proceed by the Portland, Saco & Portsmouth Railroad to Washington, D. C., at 8 AM on 1 June, 1861, and arrived by the Eastern (Massachusetts) Railroad at Boston, Suffolk County, via South Berwick, York County, Maine; Portsmouth, Rockingham County, County, New Hampshire, and Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, at 3 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the Fall River Railroad to Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts, at 7 PM on 1 June, 1861, and arrived by the steamer Bay State at Pier No.3, on the North River, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 12 PM on 2 June, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Washington, D. C., 2-3 June, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry was ordered across the Hudson River by ferry to Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, at 4 PM on 2 June, 1861, and arrived by the Camden & Amboy Railroad at Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, at 1 Am on 3 june, 1861. The regiment arrived by ferry boat across the Delaware River at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 2 AM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad at 3 AM on 3 Jne, 1861. The 1st Maine Infantry arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at Washington, D. C., via Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 3 PM the same day

Maryland and Pennsylvania Avenues, near Sixth Street, Washington, D. C., 3 June, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry was stationed on Maryland and Pennsylvania Avenues, near Sixth Street, Washington, D. C., on 3 June, 1861.

Maryland & Pennsylvania Avenues, Washington, to west of Fourteenth Street, D. C., 7 June, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry was ordered west of Fourteenth Street, D. C., in the afternoon on 7 June, 1861, and arrived at Camp Jackson, west of Fourteenth Street, D. C., the same day.

Note: The 1st Maine Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at the Chain Bridge, above Georgetown, D. C, at 5 PM on 20 July, 1861, and in the afternoon on 24 July, 1861.

Note: The 1st Maine Infantry was assigned to guard the Long Bridge, Washngton, D. C., on 22 July, 1861.

Mustered out, Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, 5 August, 1861: The 1st Maine Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, in the morning on 31 July, 1861, and arrived at Park Barracks, opposite City Hall, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York,via Baltimore City, Maryland, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 5 Pm on 1 August, 1861. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the steamer Bay State to Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts, at 12 PM on 2 August, 1861, and arrived in the morning on 3 August, 1861. The 1st Maine Infantry arrived by the Portland, Saco & Portsmouth Railroad at Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, at 2 PM the same day and was mustered out on 5 August, 1861.
Mustered in United States service for three months 3 May, 1861. Aarrived at Washington, D. C., 3 June, 1861

New Hampshire

First New Hampshire Infantry

Col. M W Tappan

The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was accepted in state service on 16 April, 1861, and arrived at Camp Union, Merrimack County Agricultural Society, on the Merrimack River, near Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, between 24 and 30 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, 30 April & 2, 3, 4, & & May, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry, Companies A and C, were mustered in United States service for three months at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 30 April, 1861; Companies B, D, and E, on 2 May, 1861; Companies F, G, and H, on 3 May, 1861; Company I on 4 May, 1861; and Company K on 7 May, 1861.

Organisation of 1st New Hampshire Infantry, 7 May, 1861: Colonel M W Tappan, Lieutenant Colonel T J Whipple, Major A F Stevens; Company A, Captain L Bell; Company B, Captain D R Kenney; Company C, Captain J L Kelley; Company D, Captain I McL Barton; Company E, Captain R O Greenleaf; Company F, Captain A S Edgerly; Company G, Captain A J Sargent; Company H, Captain J D Drew; Company I, Captain E E Sturtevant; Company K, Captain G E Sleeper

Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 25-26 May, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Concord, Manchester & Lancaster Railroad to Washington, D. C., in the morning on 25 May, 1861, and arrived by the New York & Harlem Railroad at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, in the morning on 26 May, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Washington, D. C., 26-28 May, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered across the Hudson River by ferry at Cortlandt Street Ferry Terminal to Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, on 26 May, 1861, and arrived by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad at Baltimore City, Maryland, via Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 4 PM on 27 May, 1861. The regiment arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at Washington, D. C., via Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 1.30 AM on 28 May, 1861.

Kalorama, near Lyons' Mill, on Rock Creek, D. C., 28 May, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was stationed at Kalorama, near Lyons' Mill, on Rock Creek, D. C., on 28 May, 1861.

Rockville Expedition, 10-30 June, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, under the command of Colonel C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, to secure the area of Maryland by the Potomac River northwest of Washington, D. C., on 10 June, 1861, and arrived at Camp Lincoln, the Montgomery Fairgrounds, near Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, at 9 PM the same day (See the Rockville Expedition).

Rockville to Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, 14-15 June, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, in the evening on 14 June, 1861, and arrived at Darnestown, Montgomery County, Maryland, the same day. The regiment was ordered to Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, in the morning on 15 June, 1861, arrived at Camp Stone, near Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, at 12 PM the same day.

Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, to Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, Companies A, C, E, G, & I, 14-15 June, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry, Company A, under the command of Captain L Bell and Lieutenant Colonel T J Whipple, was ordered Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, in the evening on 15 June, 1861, and arrived at to Camp Tappan, near Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, the same day. Companies C, E, G, and I, under the command of Major A F Stevens, were ordered to Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, in the morning on 16 June, 1861, and arrived at Camp Tappan, near Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, the same day.

Note: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry, Companies B, D, F, H, and K, were assigned to garrison duty, under the command of Colonel M Tappan, at Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, on 15 June, 1861.

Skirmish at Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, 17 June, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry, Companies A, C, E, G, and I, were engaged in a skirmish at Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, on 17 June, 1861, and a detachment of twenty sharpshooters of the 17th Pennslvania Infantry, under the command of Captain J H Gardiner, Company E, were ordered to Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, in the evening the same day.

Special Orders No.109, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., 30 June, 1861: Colonel C P Stone was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.109, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 30 June, 1861.

Conrads Ferry, on the Potomac River, & Poolesville, Montgomery County, to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, 3-6 July, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to the Monocacy River on 3 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Goodwin, near the mouth of the Monocacy River, on the Potomac River, the same day. The company stationed at Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac River, arrived at Camp Goodwin, near the mouth of the Monocacy River, on the Potomac River, in the morning on 5 July, 1861, and the 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, shortly afterwards. The regiment arrived at Camp Berry, near Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 5 July, 1861, and a detachment of the 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, in the evening the same day. A detachment of the 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, at 12 PM on 6 July, 1861.

Note: A company of the 1st New Hampshire Infantry was stationed at Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac River, on 3 July, 1861, and two companies were assigned to guard duty at Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, on 6 July, 1861.

Sandy Hook to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, 6-7 July, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Maryland, at 7 PM on 6 July, 1861, and arrived at Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland, at 2 AM on 7 July, 1861. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the Hagerstown Turnpike to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, in the morning the same day and arrived in the afternoon on 7 July, 1861.

Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, 7-8 July, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at Lemon's Ferry, near Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 4 PM on 7 July, 1861, and arrived near the Potomac River in the evening the same day. The regiment was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 4 AM on 8 July, 1861, and arrived at 10 AM the same day.

Note: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was temporarily assigned to the Seventh Brigade, Second Division, Army of Pennsylvania, under the command of Colonel General C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, by Special Orders No.94, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861, and to the Seventh Brigade, Third Division, Army of Pennsylvania, by Special Orders No.96, Paragragh I, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 10 July, 1861. (See the Seventh Brigade, Third Division, Army of Pennsylvania).

Martinsburg, Berkeley County, to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, 15-17 July, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the morning on 15 July, 1861, and arrived in the vicinity of at Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 2 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the morning on 17 July, 1861, and arrived by the Middleway, Charlestown & harpers Ferry Turnpike at Camp Whipple, near Charlestown via Middleway or Smithfield, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the afternoon the same day.

Charlestown to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 3 AM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at Bolivar Heights, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: A detachment of five men of the 1st New Hampshire Infantry were captured by the Loudoun Cavalry near Heaters Island, on the Potomac River, on 14 July, 1861 (See the Loudoun Cavalry).

Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, 28 July, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 28 July, 1861.

Note: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was assigned to the Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, under the command of Colonel C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, by General Orders No.36, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Shenandoah, Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 29 July, 1861, and was ordered to Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, by Special Orders, No.147, Headquarters, Army of the Shenandoah, Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 1 August, 1861.

Mustered out, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, 9 August, 1861: The 1st New Hampshire Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 2 August, 1861, and was mustered out on 9 August, 1861.
Mustered in United States service for three months 1-4 May, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 28 May, 1861

Massachusetts

Third Massachusetts Battalion Rifles, Company D (Dodd's Rifles or Carvers)

Capt. A Dodd

Dodd's Rifles or Carvers was accepted in state service at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, on 19 April, 1861.

Note: The 3rd Massachusetts Battalion Rifles, Company D, was ordered to rendezvous at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, to Washington, D. C., 2-5 May, 1861: Dodd's Rifles or Carvers was ordered to proceed by the steamer Cambridge to Washington, D. C., on 2 May, 1861, and was accompanied by three or four companies of the 3rd Massachusetts Infantry and the 4th Massachusetts Infantry. The company arrived at Washington, D. C., via Fortress Monroe, Old Comfort Point, Hampton, Virginia, at 3 PM on 8 May, 1861.

Washington, D. C., to Fort McHenry, near Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, 14 May, 1861: Dodd's Rifles or Carvers was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Fort McHenry, near Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, at 10 AM on 14 May, 1861, and was accompanied by five companies of the 8th Massachusetts Infantry. The company arrived Fort McHenry, near Locust Point, Baltimore City, via Relay House, Baltimore County, Maryland, the same day (See the Three Months Volunteers, Department of Annapolis).

Note: Dodd's Rifles or Carvers was assigned to the 3rd Massachusetts Battalion Rifles, Company D, under the command of Major C Devens, Jr., at Fort McHenry, near Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, on 15 May, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Fort McHenry, near Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, 16 May, 1861: Dodd's Rifles or Carvers was mustered in United States service for three months at Fort McHenry, near Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, by Second Lieutenant H S Putnam, United States Corps Topographical Engineers, on 16 May, 1861 (See the United States Corps Topographical Engineers, Balloon Detachment).

Mustered out, 3 August, 1861: The 3rd Massachusetts Battalion Rifles, Company D, was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, on 30 July, 1861, and arrived by the Camden & Amboy Railroad and the Camden & Amboy Ferry at Park Barracks, near City Hall, at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, in the evening on 31 July, 1861. The company was ordered to proceed by the Norwich Boat to Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at 5 PM on 1 August, 1861, and arrived on 2 August, 1861. The 3rd Massachusetts Battalion Rifles, Company D, arrived at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 2.30 PM the same day and was mustered out at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 3 August, 1861. (See Fort McHenry, Department of Annapolis).
Mustered in United States service for three months 16 May, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 5 May, 1861

Sixth Massachsetts Infantry

Col. E F Jones

The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was accepted in state service on 15 April, 1861, and was ordered to rendezvous at Boston Common, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, by Special Orders No.14, Headquarters, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 12 PM on 16 April, 1861, dated 15 April, 1861. The 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Companies A, C, D, and H, were stationed at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in the morning on 16 April, 1861; Company C was ordered to Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in the morning on 16 April, 1861; Company E at 7 AM on 16 April, 1861; Companies F and I in the morning on 16 April, 1861; Company G at 9.30 AM on 16 April, 1861; and Company K in the morning on 16 April, 1861. The 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Company L, was ordered to Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 2 AM on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at the State House, on Boston Common, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 11 AM on 17 April, 1861.

Note: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861, and the 1st Massachusetts (Militia) Infantry, Company C, and the 7th Massachusetts (Militia) Infantry, Company C, were assigned to the 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Companies K and L, respectively, at 10 PM on 16 April, 1861.

Lowell, Middlesex County, to Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 16 April, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was orderd to proceed by the Boston & Lowell Railroad in the morning on 16 April, 1861, and was to stationed at Boylston Hall, over Boylston Market, on the corner of Boylston and Washington Streets, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 1 PM on 16 April, 1861.

Note: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was mustered in state service for three months at Huntington Hall, Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at 9 AM on 16 April, 1861, and Brigadier General B F Butler was assigned to command the Third Brigade, Second Division, Massachusetts (Militia) Volunteers, on 17 April, 1861.

Third Brigade, Second Division, Massachusetts (Militia) Volunteers, 17 April, 1861: Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers; 3rd Massachusetts Infantry, Colonel D W Wardrop; 4th Massachusetts Infantry, Colonel A B Packard; 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Colonel E F Jones; 8th Massachusetts Infantry, Colonel T Monroe

Organisation of 6th Massachusetts Infantry, 17 April, 1861: Colonel E F Jones, Lieutenant Colonel W Shattuck, Major B F Watson; Company A, National Greys, Captain J A Sawtelle; Company B, Groton Artillery, Captain E S Clark; Company C, Mechanics' Phalanx, Captain A S Follansbee; Company D, Lowell City Guards, Captain J W Hart; Company E, Davis Guards, Captain D Tuttle; Company F, Warren Light Guards, Captain B F Chadbourne; Company G, Worcester Light Infantry, Captain H W Pratt; Company H, Watson Light Guards, Captain J F Noyes; Company I, Lawrence Light Infantry, Captain J Pickering; Company K, Washington Light Guards, Captain W S Sampson; Company L, Stoneham Light Infantry, Captain J H Dike

Note: Lieutenant Colonel W Shattuck, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, resigned between 16 April and 16 May, 1861, and Major B F Watson, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, was appointed lieutenant colonel, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, and Captain J A Sawtelle, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Company A, was appointed major, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, on 17 May, 1861. Sergeant G M Dickerson, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Company A, was appointed captain, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, Company A, on 18 May, 1861.

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, to Harve de Grace, Harford County, Maryland, 16-19 April, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry (635) was ordered by to proceed by the Boston & Worcester Railroad to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 7 PM on 17 April, 1861, and arrived by the New York & New Haven Railroad via via Springfield, Massachusetts, Worcester County, and New Haven, New London County, Connecticut, at 8 AM ion 18 April, 1861. The regiment was ordered across the Hudson River by ferry to Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, at 2 PM the same day and arrived by the New Jesey Railroad at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, at 5 PM on 18 April, 1861. The 6th Massachusetts Infantry arrived by the Philadelphia & Tenton Railroad at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 8 PM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad to Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, at 1 AM on 19 April, 1861. The regiment was ordered across the Susquehanna River by steamer to Harve de Grace, Harford County, Maryland, the same day.

Note: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was accompanied by the Lowell Brigade Brass Band, under the command of Band Leader G Brooks, on 16 April, 1861.

Harve de Grace, Harford County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 19 April, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Baltimore City, Maryland, in the morning on 19 April, 1861, and was accompanied by a detachment of seven companies of the 1st Regiment Infantry, Washington Guards, and five companies of the 2nd Regiment Infantry, Washington Guards, under the command of Brigadier General W S Small, Pennsylvania Volunteers (See the 27th Pennsylvania Infantry). The regiment arrived at President Street Station, on President Street, Baltimore City, Maryland, at 12 PM the same day and was engaged in a skirmish at Pratt Street, Baltimore City, Maryland, in the afternoon on 19 April, 1861. The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Washington, D. C., the same day amd arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, via Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 6 PM on 19 April, 1861.

Note: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was accompanied by a detachment of seven companies of the 1st Regiment Infantry, Washington Guards, and five companies of the 2nd Regiment Infantry, Washington Guards, under the command of Brigadier General W S Small, Pennsylvania Volunteers, to Baltimore City, Maryland, in the morning on 19 April, 1861 (See the 27th Pennsylvania Infantry).

Senate Chamber, Capital building, Washington, D. C., 19 April, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was stationed at the Senate Chamber, Capitol building, Washington, D. C., on 19 April, 1861.

Note: The Ringgold Light Artillery, the Allen Infantry, the Logan Guards, the National Light Infantry, and the Washington Artillery were stationed at the Capitol building, Washington, D. C., on 22 April, 1861 (See the (See the 25th Pennsylvania Infantry).

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., 22 April, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at Washington, D. C., on 22 April, 1861.

Abstract from returns of the volunteer troops in the Department of Washington, Colonel J F K Mansfield, United States Army, commanding, 30 April, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was stationed at the Capital, Washington, D. C., on 30 April, 1861.

Washington, D. C., to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, 5 May, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, by Special Orders No.43, Headquarters, Department of Washington, Washington, D. C., on 4 May, 1861, and arrived by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, at 5 PM on 5 May, 1861. The regiment was stationed at Luckett's and Talbot's Farms, near Elkridge Landing, on the Patapsco River, and Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, between 5 May and 29 July, 1861.

Note: The 8th New York State Militia Infantry and the Boston Light Artillery, under the command of Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers, arrived at Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, at 11 AM on 5 May, 1861, and the 6th Massachusetts Infantry and the 8th New York State Militia Infantry were stationed at Luckett's and Talbot's Farms, near Elkridge Landing, on the Patapsco River, and Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, the same day.

Troops stationed near Elkridge Landing, on the Patapsco River, & Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, 12 May, 1861: Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers; 6th Massachusetts Infantry (635), 8th New York State Militia Infantry (900), Boston Light Arillery (116)

Note: Colonel E F Jones, 6th Massachusetts Infantry was assigned to command Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, between 13 and 21 May, 1861.

Occupation of Baltimore City, Maryland, detachment of 6th Massachusetts Infantry, 13 May, 1861: Five hundred men of the 6th Massachusetts Infantry, under the command of Colonel E F Jones, were ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Baltimore City, Maryland, under the command of Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers, in the afternoon on 13 May, 1861, and were accompanied by four hundred and fifty men of the 8th New York State Militia Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel C G Waterbury, and a section of the Boston Light Artillery, under the command of Major A Cook. The five hundred men of the 6th Massachusetts Infantry arrived at Camden Station, Baltimore City, Maryland, at 8 PM the same day and was ordered to Federal Hill, Baltimore City, Maryland, in the evening on 13 May, 1861.

Note: The detachments of the 6th Massachusetts Infantry and the 8th New York State Militia Infantry were stationed at an old frame house on Hamburg Street; public school room No.10, Armstrong's Hall, on the corner of Light and Montgomery Streets; the new Watchman Engine House, Montgomery, near William Street, and National Hotel, Baltimore City, Maryland, and Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers, set up headquarters at Shillinger's House, on Federal Hill, Baltimore City, Maryland, in the evening on 13 May, 1861.

Federal Hill, Baltimore City, to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, 16 May, 1861: Five hundred men of the 6th Massachusetts Infantry were ordered to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, under the command of Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers, in the morning on 16 May, 1861, and were accompanied by a section of the Boston Light Artillery and the 8th New York State Militia Infantry.

Note: Brigadier General B F Butler, Massachusetts Volunteers, was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Washington, D. C., in the morning on 16 May, 1861, and by the Washington, Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Fort Monroe, Old Comfort Point, Hampton, Virginia, on 20 May, 1861. Colonel E F Jones, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, was ordered to proceed by the Washington, Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, on 21 May, 1861, and Major B F Watson, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, was assigned to command the 6th Massachusetts Infantry near Elkridge Landing, on the Patapsco River, and Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, the same day.

Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, near Elkridge Landing, Howard County, to Baltimore City, Maryland, 13 June, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Baltimore City, Maryland, on 13 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the Boston Light Artillery. The regiment arrived at Mount Clare Depot, on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Baltimore City, Maryland, the same day.

Baltimore City to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, 14 June, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, on 14 June, 1861.

Note: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry (635) was stationed near Elkridge Landing, on the Patapsco River, & Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, on 19 June, 1861.

Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, to Baltimore City, Maryland, 26 June, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Baltimore City, Maryland, on 26 June, 1861, and arrived at Mount Clare Depot, on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Baltimore City, Maryland, the same day.

Troops stationed at Baltimore City, Maryland, 27 June, 1861: 6th Massachusetts Infantry (800); 13th New York State Militia Infantry (1,280); 18th Pennsylvania Infantry (780); 19th Pennsylvania Infantry (600); 22nd Pennsylvania Infantry (780); 1st Maryland Infantry (1,000); 2nd Maryland Infantry, 3 companies (300); Boston Light Artillery (120)

Baltimore City to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, 2 July, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 2 July, 1861.

Note: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was stationed at Luckett's and Talbot's Farms, near Elkridge Landing, on the Patapsco River, & Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch & Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, at 9 PM on 24 July, 1861, and its three months' term of service expired on 22 July, 1861.

Mustered out, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 2 August, 1861: The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 6 AM on 29 July, 1861, and arrived at Baltimore City, Maryland, at 9 AM the same day. The regiment was stationed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 31 July, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Camden & Amboy Railroad to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 8 AM the same day. The 6th Massachusetts Infantry arrived at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, in the morning on 31 July, 1861, and arrived at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at 5 PM on 1 August, 1861. The regiment was mustered out at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 2 August, 1861.
Mustered in United States service for three months 22 April, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 19 April, 1861

New York

Jackson Horse Guards or Devin's Independent Cavalry (FirsT New York State Militia Cavalry)

Capt. T C Devin

The 1st New York State Militia Cavalry was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 3 July, 1861, and a detachment of one hundred men of the 1st New York State Militia Cavalry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel T C Devin, was stationed at The Battery, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 16 July, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Washington, D. C., 17-18 July, 1861: A detachment of one hundred men of the 1st New York State Militia Cavalry were ordered to proceed by the steamer Kill von Kull across the Hudson or North River to Elizabethport, Union County, New Jersey, at 10 AM on 17 July, 1861, and were accompanied by Captains W E During, J F Barkley, and G Mundorf, and Lieutenant Colonel T C Devin, 1st New York State Militia Cavalry. The detachment was ordered to proceed by the New Jersey Central Railroad to Washington, D. C., the same day and arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, via Reading, Berks County, and Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore City and Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 1 AM on 18 July, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., 19 July, 1861: The Jackson Horse Guards or Devin's Independent Cavalry, 1st New York State Militia Cavalry, under the command of Captain T C Devin, was mustered in United States service for three months, at Washington, D. C., on 19 July, 1861.

Organisation of Jackson Horse Guards or Devin's Independent Cavalry, 1st New York State Militia Cavalry, 19 July, 1861: Captain T C Devin, First Lieutenant F Reiss, Second Lieutenant H Kyrion

Mustered out, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 23 October, 1861: The Jackson Horse Guards or Devin's Independent Cavalry, 1st New York State Militia Cavalry, was mustered out at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 23 October, 1861.
Mustered in United States service for three months 14 July, 1861. Ordered to Washington, D. C., 3 July, 1861

Fifth New York State Militia Infantry

Col. C Schwarzwa(E)lder

The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and Corps Engineers, were accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 19 April, 1861, and was ordered to The Battery, opposite City Hall, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 23 April, 1861.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861, and was mustered in state service for three months on 23 April, 1861.

Organisation of 5th New York State Militia Infantry, 16 May, 1861, dated 1 May, 1861: Colonel C Schwarzwa(e)lder, Lieutenant Colonel L Burger, Major C Von Amsberg; Corps of Engineers, Captain J P B Dodge; Company A, Captain J F Gerdes; Company B, Captain H Heitman; Company C, Captain N Betjeman; Company D, Captain D F Meyer; Company E, Captain E P Nickel; Company F, Captain F F Heppenheimer; Company G, Captain J H Luke; Company H, Captain H Barlach; Company I, Captain J F Droge

Note: Captain E P Nickel, 5th New York State Militia Infantry, Company E, resigned on 27 April, 1861, and the 5th New York State Militia Infantry, Company I, under the command of Captain J F Droge, was accepted in state service on 29 April, 1861. Captain J F Gerdes, 5th New York State Militia Infantry, Company A, resigned on 3 June, 1861, and First Lieutenant G H W Neander was appointed captain, 5th New York State Militia Infantry, Company A, on 7 June, 1861, dated 1 June, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 27-30 April, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry (600) was ordered to proceed by the steamer Kedar to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 6 PM on 28 April, 1861, and was accompanied by officers of the 71st New York State Militia Infantry (See the 71st New York State Militia Infantry). The regiment arrived at Fort Monroe, Old Comfort Point, Hampton, Virginia, in the afternoon on 29 April, 1861, and at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 7 PM on 30 April, 1861. The 5th New York State Militia Infantry disembarked at the grounds of the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 2 May, 1861.

Note: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, between 27 April and 3 May, 1861 (See the 69th New York State Militia Infantry).

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, 2-3 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, in the evening on 2 May, 1861, and arrived in the morning on 3 May, 1861.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at Camp Reynolds, on the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad, near Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, on 3 May, 1861, and was assigned to guard duty on the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad between Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, and Annapolis Junction, Howard County, as far as Laurel, Prince George's County, Maryland, between 3 and 11 May, 1861.

Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 11-12 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Washington, D. C., in the evening on 11 May, 1861, and arrived at 2 AM on 12 May, 1861.

Note: The 20th New York State Militia Infantry arrived at Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, in the evening on 11 May, 1861 (See the Three Months' Volunteers, Department of Annapolis).

Woodward's building, on North D Street, near the corner of Eleventh Street & Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C., 12 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Woodward's building, on North D Street, near the corner of Eleventh Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C., on 12 May, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., 16 May, 1861, dated 1 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at Washington, D. C., by Brevet Major & Assistant Adjutant General I McDowell, United States Army, on 16 May, 1861, dated 1 May, 1861.

Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., 22 May, 1861: Major General C W Sandford, New York Volunteers, was ordered to assume immediate command of all the regiments of his State within the District of Columbia, and to report directly to general headquarters by Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 22 May, 1861.

Occupation of Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, & Alexandria, 24 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel L Burger, was ordered across the Potomac River at the Aqueduct Bridge, Georgtown, D. C., at 2 AM on 24 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Union, near the Georgetown & Falls Church Road between Arlington Heights and Ball's Crossroads, Alexandria County, Virginia, in the morning the same day (See the Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria).

Note: Colonel C Schwarzwalder, 5th New State Militia Infantry, was on sick leave of absence at Washington, D. C., on 23 May, 1861, and the 28th New State Militia Infantry, Company E, and the 5th New State Militia Infantry, Corps Engineers, under the command of First Lieutenant D C Houston, United States Corps Engineers, destroyed the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad and two bridges in the vicinity of the intersection of the Georgetown & Falls Church Road and the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad on 24 May, 1861 (See the United States Corps Engineers).

General Orders No.1, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Alexandria, Virginia, 28 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, the 28th New York State Militia Infantry, the 69th New York State Militia Infantry, and other troops or detachments in his vicinity were assigned to Colonel D Hunter, 3rd United States Cavalry, by General Orders No.1, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Alexandria, Virginia, on 28 May, 1861.

Note: The 2nd New York State Militia Infantry, Company G (1st), under the command of Captain L Jaehrling, was mustered in United States service as the 5th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, at Washington, D. C., by Brevet Captain & Assistant Adjutant General W D Wipple, United States Army, on 24 June, 1861, dated 1 May, 1861 (See the 2nd New York State Militia Infantry).

Order No.1, Headquarters, Brigade of the Aqueduct, Ross' House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, 30 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Aqueduct Brigade, under the command of Colonel D Hunter, 3rd United States Cavalry, by Order No.1, Headquarters, Brigade of the Aqueduct, Ross' House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 May, 1861.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, the 28th New York State Militia Infantry, and the 69th New York State Militia Infantry and other troops or detachments in the vicinity not otherwise assigned were assigned to the Aqueduct Brigade, under the command of Colonel D Hunter, 3rd United States Cavalry, by Order No.1, Headquarters, Brigade of the Aqueduct, Ross' House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 May, 1861 (See the 69th New York State Militia Infantry).

Georgetown & Falls Church Road between Arlington Heights & Ball's Crossroads, Alexandria County, Virginia, to Meridian Hill, D. C., 5 June, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River to Meridian Hill, D. C., on 5 June, 1861, and arrived west of Fourteenth Street, near Meridian Hill, D. C., the same day.

Special Orders No.16, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, 30 June, 1861: Colonel W T Sherman, 13th United States Infantry, was assigned to command the 5th New York State Militia Infantry by Special Orders No.16, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 June, 1861 (See the Third Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army).

West of Fourteenth Street, near Meridian Hill, D. C., to Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, 7-8 July, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel L Burger, was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, under the command of Major General C W Sandford, New York Volunteers, at 3 PM on 7 July, 1861, and was accompanied by the 12th New York State Militia Infantry. The regiment arrived by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Baltimore City, Maryland, at 7 PM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Northern Central Railroad to Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, at 12 AM on 8 July, 1861. The 5th New York State Militia Infantry arrived at Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, at 12 PM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Cumberland Valley Railroad to Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, on 8 July, 1861. The regiment arrived by the Franklin Railroad at Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, at 11 PM on 8 July, 1861.

Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, 9-10 July, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 5 PM on 9 July, 1861, and proceeded across the Potomac River at Lemon's Ferry, near Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 8.30 PM the same day. The regiment arrived at Camp Meigs, near Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia at 5 AM on 10 July, 1861.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Eighth Brigade, Third Division, Army of Pennsylvania, under the command of Acting Brigadier General & Colonel D Butterfield, 12th New York State Militia Infantry, by Special Orders No.96, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 10 July, 1861 (See the Eighth Brigade, Third Division, Army of Pennsylvania).

Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, 15-17 July, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the morning on 15 July, 1861, and arrived in the vicinity of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 5 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the morning on 17 July, 1861, and arrived by the Middleway, Charlestown & Harpers Ferry Turnpike via Middleway or Smithfield, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Charlestown to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 5 AM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at Bolivar Heights, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, to Knoxville, Frederick County, Maryland, 28 July, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 28 July, 1861, and arrived near Knoxville, Frederick County, Maryland, the same day.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, under the command of Colonel C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, by General Orders No.36, Headquarters, Army of the Shenandoah, Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 29 July, 1861, and was ordered to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, by Special Orders No.144, Headquarters, Department of the Shenandoah, Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 30 July, 1861 (See the First Brigade, First Division, Army of Pennsylvania).

Mustered out, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 7 August, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, in the morning on 31 July, 1861, and arrived at Baltimore City via Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, at 4 PM the same day. The regiment arrived by the New Jersey Central Rairoad at Elizabethport, Union County, New Jersey, via Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, at 2 AM on 2 August, 1861, and at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 8 AM the same day. The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was mustered out at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, by Lieutenant Colonel O L Shepherd, 18th United States Infantry, on 7 August, 1861.
Mustered in United States service for three months 1 May, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 11 May, 1861

Seventh New York State Militia Infantry

Col. M Lefferts

The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was accepted in state service for thirty days at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 17 April, 1861.

Note: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861, and was mustered in state service on 17 Apri, 1861.

Organisation of 7th New York State Militia Infantry, 14 May, 1861: Colonel M Lefferts, Lieutenant Colonel W A Pond, Major A Shaler; Corps of Engineers, Captain E L Viele; Company A, Captain W P Bensel; Company B, Captain E Clark; Company C, Captain J Price; Company D, Captain W H Riblet; Company E, Captain W A Speaight; Company F, Captain B M Nevers, Jr.; Company G, Captain J Monroe; Company H, Captain H C Shumway; Company I, Captain N B McLaughlin; Company K, Captain G C Farrar

Note: Lieutenant Colonel W A Pond, 7th New York State Militia Infantry, was on a sick leave of absence between 19 April and 1 June, 1861, and First Lieutenant M A Cragin was commanding the 7th New York State Militia Infantry, Company I, on 14 May, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Annapolis, Howard County, Maryland, 19-22 April, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry (1,050) was ordered by ferry across the Hudson River to Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, via Cortlandt Sreet Ferry Terminal, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 6 PM on 19 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the New Jersey Railroad to Washington, D. C., the same day. The 7th New York State Militia Infantry arrived by the Philadelphia & Trenton Railroad at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 12 AM on 20 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the steamer Boston on the Delaware River to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 3 PM the same day. The 7th New York State Militia Infantry arrived by Chesapeake Bay at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 7 AM on 22 April, 1861, and disembarked at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 5 PM the same day.

Annapolis, Howard County, to Annapolis Junction, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 24-25 April, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies B and F, and a detachment of Company K and one brass howitzer, under the command of Senior Captain B M Nevers, Jr., Company F, were ordered to proceed by the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 4 AM on 24 April, 1861, and Companies A, C, D, E, G, H, I, and a detachment of Company K and one brass howitzer, under the command of Colonel M Lefferts, at 8 AM the same day. The 7th New York State Militia Infantry arrived at Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, between 3 and 4 AM on 25 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the 8th Massachusetts Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H (See the Three Months' Volunteers, Department of Annapolis & Maryland).

Note: A detachment of the 7th New York State Militia Infantry, Company B, under the command of Captain E Clark; Company E, under the command ofCaptain B M Nevers, Jr.; and Company K, under the command of First Lieutenant T B Bunting, were ordered to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 2 AM on 24 April, 1861.

Annapolis Junction, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C, 25 April, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Washington, D. C., at 10 AM on 25 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the National Rifles, District of Columbia Militia, under the command of Captain J R Smead (See the District of Columbia Militia, Department of Washington). The regiment arrived at Washington, D. C., at 12 PM the same day.

Mustered in thirty days, Washington, D. C., 26 April, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was mustered in United States service for thirty days at Washington, D. C., in the afternoon on 26 April, 1861.

Note: Captains W P Bensel and G C Farrar, 7th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies A and K, respectively, were mustered in United States service on 14 May, 1861.

Willard's Hotel, on the corner of Fourteenth Street & Pennsylvania Avenue; Brown's Hotel, on the northwest corner of Pennsylvania Avenue & Sixth Street; & the National Hotel, on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C., 25 April, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at Willard's Hotel, on the corner of Fourteenth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue; Brown's Hotel, on the northwest corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and Sixth Street; and the National Hotel, on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C., on 25 April, 1861.

Washington to W J Stone's Farm, between Seventh & Fourteenth Streets, D. C., 2 May, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to W J Stone's Farm, between Seventh and Fourteenth Streets, D. C., at 4 PM on 2 May, 1861, and arrived at to Camp Cameron, near W J Stone's Farm, between Seventh and Fourteenth Streets, D. C., the same day.

Abstract from returns of the volunteer troops in the Department of Washington, Colonel J F K Mansfield, United States Army, commanding, 30 April, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at the Capital, Washington, D. C., on 30 April, 1861.

Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., 22 May, 1861: Major General C W Sandford, New York Volunteers, was ordered to assume immediate command of all the regiments of his State within the District of Columbia, and to report directly to general headquarters by Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 22 May, 1861.

Occupation of Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, & Alexandria, Virginia, 24 May, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., at 12 AM on 24 May, 1861, and Companies I and K (artillery companies) were assigned to guard duty at Camp Cameron, Stone's Farm, near Columbian College, Meridian Hill, D. C., the same day. Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and I were ordered across the Potomac River at the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., in the morning on 24 May, 1861, and arrived at Hugh's Tavern, near the Virginia end of the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., the same day (See the Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria). The 7th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and I, were ordered to proceed by the Columbia Turnpike to Hunting Park Racecourse, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, at 6 PM on 24 May, 1861.

Fort Runyon, near the Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, 25 May, 1861: A detachment of the 7th New York State Militia Infantry, under the command of Captain R L Viele, Engineer Corps, were ordered to level to the ground a peach orchard of three hundred trees at Fort Runyon, near the Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 25 May, 1861.

Hunting Park Racecourse, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, to Washington, D. C., 26 May, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., in the evening on 26 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Cameron, near W J Stone's Farm, between Seventh and Fourteenth Streets, D. C., at 9 PM the same day.

Mustered out, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 3 June, 1861: The 7th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, by Special Orders No.146, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., at 3 PM on 31 May, 1861, dated 30 May, 1861, and arrived by the New Jersey Railroad at Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, at 5 PM on 1 June, 1861. The regiment was mustered out at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, by First Lieutenant M Cogswell, 8th United States Infantry, Company E, on 3 June, 1861 (See the United States Battalion Infantry).
Arrived at Washington, D. C., 25 April, 1861. Mustered in United States service for thirty days 27 April, 1861

Twelfth New York State Militia Infantry

Col. D Butterfield

The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 19 April, 1861.

Note: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861, was mustered in state service on 19 April, 1861.

Organisation of 12th New York State Militia Infantry, 2 May, 1861: Colonel D Butterfield, Lieutenant Colonel W G Ward, Major H A Bostwick; Company A, Captain J Ward, Jr.; Company B, Captain W Hudson; Company C, Captain W Fowler; Company D, Captain J D Ottiwell; Company E, Captain H W Ryder; Company F, Captain J Cromie; Company G, Captain J A Boyle; Company H, Captain W H McCormack; Company I, Captain W Rayner; Company K, Captain R H Olmstead

Note: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies A and K, under the command of Captains J Ward, Jr., and R H Olmstead, were accepted in state service on 15 June and 8 May, 1861, respectively.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 21-23 April, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry (900) was ordered to proceed by the steamer Baltic to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 5.30 AM on 21 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane and Major E D Keyes, 1st United States Artillery. The regiment arrived at Fort Monroe, Old Comfort Point, Hampton, Virginia, at 10 PM on 22 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by Chesapeake Bay to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 2 PM on 23 April, 1861. The 12th New York State Militia Infantry arrived at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, between 8 and 9 PM the same day and disembarked in the afternoon on 26 April, 1861.

Steamer Baltic: 12th New York State Militia Infantry, First Lieutenant G W Synder, United States Corps Engineers, Major E D Keyes, 1st United States Artillery; Steamer Columbia: 6th New York State Militia Infantry; Steamer R R Cuyler (See the Three Months' Volunteers, Department of Annapolis); 71st New York State Militia Infantry (See the 71st New York State Militia Infantry); Steamer Coatzacoalcos: 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, first detachment (See the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry).

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C, 26-28 April, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad, to Washington, D. C., at 2.30 PM on 26 April, 1861, and arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, via Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 9 PM 28 April, 1861.

Green's & Casparis' Houses, on South A Street, between East First Street & New Jersey Avenue, near the Capitol building, Washington, D. C., 28 April, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at Green's and Casparis' Houses, on South A Street, between East First Street and New Jersey Avenue, near the Capitol building, Washington, D. C., on 28 April, 1861.

Abstract from returns of the volunteer troops in the Department of Washington, Colonel J F K Mansfield, United States Army, commanding, 30 April, 1861: Six companies of the 12th New York State Militia Infantry were stationed at the Assembly Rooms and three companies on Sixth street, near Pennsylvania avenue, Washington, D. C., on 30 April, 1861.

Note: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies A and F, were stationed at bridges on the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, near Laurel Factory, Prince George's County, Maryland, on 2 May, 1861.

Green's & Casparis' Houses,on South A Street, between East First Street & New Jersey Avenue, near the Capitol building, to Franklin Square, between Twelfth & Fourteenth Streets, Washington, D. C., 8 May, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Franklin Square, between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, Washington, D. C., on 8 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Anderson, Franklin Square, between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, Washington, D. C., the same day.

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., 2 May, 1861, dated 16 April, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at Washington, D. C., on 2 May, 1861, dated 16 April, 1861.

Note: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, and twenty-three recruits of Company I arrived at Washington, D. C., at 12 PM on 23 May, 1861.

Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., 22 May, 1861: Major General C W Sandford, New York Volunteers, was ordered to assume immediate command of all the regiments of his State within the District of Columbia, and to report directly to general headquarters by Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 22 May, 1861.

Occupation of Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, & Alexandria, 24 May, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., at 2 AM on 24 May, 1861, and arrived at Four Miles Run, near Roach's Mills, Alexandria County, Virginia, the same day (See the Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria).

General Orders No.1, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Alexandria, Virginia, 28 May, 1861: The 8th New York State Militia Infantry, the 12th New York State Militia Infantry, the 25th New York State Militia Infantry and other troops or detachments in his vicinity were assigned to Colonel S P Heintzelman, 17th United States Infantry, by General Orders No.1, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Alexandria, Virginia, on 28 May, 1861.

Roach's Mills, Alexandria County, Virginia, to Franklin Square, between Twelfth & Fourteenth Streets, Washington, D. C., 7 June, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed across the Potomac River by the Long Bridge to Washington, D. C., at 2 PM on 7 June, 1861, and arrived at Franklin Square, between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, Washington, D. C., in the afternoon the same day.

Note: The 1st Connecticut Infantry arrived near Roach's Mills, Alexandria County, Virginia, on the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad, in the morning on 2 June, 1861, and the 12th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to guard duty at the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., between 21 and 23 June, 1861 (See the 1st Connecticut Infantry).

Washington, D. C., to Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, 7-8 July, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantrywas ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, under the command of Major General C W Sandford, New York Volunteers, at 3 PM on 7 July, 1861, and was accompanied by the 5th New York State Militia Infantry. The regiment arrived by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Baltimore City, Maryland, at 7 PM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Northern Central Railroad to Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, at 12 AM on 8 July, 1861. The 12th New York State Militia Infantry arrived at Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, at 12 PM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Cumberland Valley Railroad to Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 8 July, 1861. The regiment arrived by the Franklin Railroad at Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, at 10 PM the same day.

Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, 9-10 July, 1861: The 28th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 5 PM on 9 July, 1861, and proceeded across the Potomac River at Lemon's Ferry, near Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 8.30 PM the same day. The regiment arrived at Camp Meigs, near Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia at 5 AM on 10 July, 1861.

Note: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Eighth Brigade, Third Division, Army of the Upper Potomac, under the command of Acting Brigadier General & Colonel D Butterfield, 12th New York State Militia Infantry, by Special Orders No.96, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 10 July, 1861 (See the Eighth Brigade, Third Division, Army of Pennsylvania).

Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, 15-17 July, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the morning on 15 July, 1861, and arrived in the vicinity of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 5 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the morning on 17 July, 1861, and arrived by the Middleway, Charlestown & Harpers Ferry Turnpike via Middleway or Smithfield, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Charlestown to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 5 AM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at Bolivar Heights, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: Four companies of the 12th New York State Militia Infantry were ordered across the Shenandoah River to Loudoun Heights, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 26 July, 1861.

Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, to Knoxville, Frederick County, Maryland, 28 July, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River to Knoxville, Frederick County, Maryland, on 28 July, 1861.

Note: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, by Special Orders No.144, Headquarters, Department of the Shenandoah, Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 30 July, 1861.

Mustered out, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 5 August, 1861: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 8 PM on 30 July, 1861, and arrived at Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, Howard County, Maryland, in the morning on 31 July, 1861. The regiment was ordered to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, in the afternoon the same day and was mustered out at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 5 August, 1861.

Special Orders No.27, Adjutant & General's Office, Washington, D. C., Companies B (2nd), C (2nd), D (2nd), E (2nd), & F (2nd), 3 Febraury, 1862: The 12th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies B and G, were consolidated as the 12th New York Infantry, Company B (2nd); Companies E and K as the 12th New York Infantry, Company E (2nd); and Companies C, D, and F as the 12th New York Infantry, Companies C (2nd), D (2nd), and F (2nd), under the command of Colonel H A Weeks, at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, by Special Orders No.27, Adjutant & General's Office, Washington, D.C., on 3 Febraury, 1862 (See the Three Months' Volunteers, Department of Washington). The 12th New York Infantry, Companies B (2nd), C (2nd), D (2nd), E (2nd), and F (2nd), were ordered to Washington, D. C., on 5 February, 1862, and arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, via Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore City and Annaplois Junction, Howard County, Maryland, on 7 February, 1862. Companies B (2nd), C (2nd), D (2nd), E (2nd), & F (2nd) arrived at Upton's Hill, near Taylor's Tavern, on the Leesburg & Alexandria Turnpike, via Alexandria, Virginia, on 8 February, 1862 See the 12th New York Infantry).

Note: Colonel D Butterfield was appointed lieutenant colonel, 12th United States Infantry.
Arrived at Washington, D. C., 28 April, 1861. Mustered in United States service for three months 2 May, 1861.

Pennsylvania

Seventeenth Pennsylvania Infantry (First Pennsylvania Artillery)

Col. F E Patterson

The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was accepted in state service as infantry on 18 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was ordered to rendezvous at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 25 April, 1861: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was mustered in United States service for three months at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by Major C F Ruff, United States Mounted Riflemen, and Captain T H Neill, 5th United States Infantry, Company C, on 25 April, 1861.

Organisation of 1st Pennsylvania Artillery, 25 April, 1861: Colonel F E Patterson, Lieutenant Colonel R O Tyler, Major W A Lerch; Company A, Captain T P Parry; Company B, Captain D F Foley; Company C, Captain J H Gardiner; Company D, Captain J H Sinex; Company E, Captain R Thompson; Company F, Captain A Murphy; Company G, Captain W Pritner; Company H, Captain I C Bassett; Company I, Captain W J J Braceland; Company K, Captain C M Tapper

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, 8 May, 1861: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad to Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, at 8.30 AM on 8 May, 1861, and arrived at 5 PM the same day.

Note: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery, the 3rd United States Artillery, Light Company E, and the 3rd United States Infantry, Companies B, D, G, H, and K, were assigned to Colonel F E Patterson, 1st Pennsylvania Artillery, at Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, on 9 May, 1861.

Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C, 9-10 May, 1861: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was ordered to proceed by the steamers Elizabeth, F W Brune, and Henry L Gaw, to Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, at 9 AM on 9 May, 1861, and was accompanied by the 3rd United States Infantry, Companies B, D, G, H, and K, under the command of Brevet Major & Captain O L Shepherd, and the 3rd United States Artillery, Light Company E, under the command of Brevet Major & Captain T W Sherman. The regiment arrived at Locust Point, Baltimore City, Maryland, at 3 PM the same day and was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Washington, D. C., on 9 May, 1861. The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at Washington, D. C., via Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 2 AM on 10 May, 1861.

Senate Chamber, Capitol building, Washington, D. C., 10 May, 1861: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was stationed at the Senate Chamber, Capitol building, Washington, D. C., on 10 May, 1861.

Note: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery, Companies I and C, were stationed on West Ninth Street, Washington, D. C., in the morning on 10 May, 1861.

Senate Chamber, Capitol building,, Washington, to Kalorama, near Lyons' Mill, on Rock Creek, D. C., 12 May, 1861: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was ordered to Kalorama, near Lyons' Mill, on Rock Creek, D. C., in the morning on 12 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Cadwalader, Kalorama, near Lyons' Mill, on Rock Creek, D. C., the same day.

Redesignated 17th Pennsylvania Infantry, 15 May, 1861: The 1st Pennsylvania Artillery was redesignated the 17th Pennsylvania Infantry on 15 May, 1861.

Rockville Expedition, 10-30 June, 1861: The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered to Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, under the command of Colonel C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, to secure the area of Maryland along the Potomac River northwest of Washington, D. C., on 10 June, 1861, and arrived at Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, the same day (See the Rockville Expedition).

The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Poolesville Road to Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, in the morning on 14 June, 1861, and was accompanied by a section of the 5th United States Artillery, Light Company D (See the 5th United States Artillery, Light Company D). The regiment arrived at Camp Stone, near Poolesville, via Darnestown, Montgomery County, Maryland, on 15 June, 1861, and the 17th Pennsylvania Infantry, Companies B and G, under the command of Captain D F Foley, Company B, were ordered to Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac River, in the evening the same day.

Note: Twenty sharpshooters of the 17th Pennsylvania Infantry, under the command of Captain J H Gardiner, Company E, were ordered to Conrads or Whites Ferry, on the Potomac River, in the evening on 17 June, 1861, and Companies I and D, were ordered to Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac River, on 18 and 29 June, 1861, respectively.

Special Orders No.109, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., 30 June, 1861: Colonel C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.109, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 30 June, 1861.

Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac River, & Poolesville, Montgomery County, to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, 2-4 July, 1861: The 17th Pennslvania Infantry, Companies A, C, D, E, F, H, I, and K, were ordered to the Licksville, Frederick County, Maryland, on 2 July, 1861, encamped near the Monocacy River the same day. Companies A, C, D, E, F, H, I, and K arrived at Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, on 3 July, 1861, and Companies B and G arrived shortly afterwards. The 17th Pennslvania Infantry was ordered to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, in the morning on 4 July, 1861, and arrived the same day.

Note: The 17th Pennslvania Infantry, Company I, under the command of Captain W J J Braceland, was assigned to guard duty at Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 6 July, 1861.

Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, 6-7 July, 1861: The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 3 AM on 6 July, 1861, and arrived at Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland, at 3 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the Hagerstown Turnpike to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 6 July, 1861, and arrived six miles beyond Sharpsburg, near Bakersville, Washington County, Maryland, in the evening on 6 July, 1861. The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry arrived at Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, in the morning on 7 July, 1861.

Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, 7-8 July, 1861: The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at Lemon Ferry, near Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 4 PM the same day and arrived near the Potomac river in the evening on 7 July, 1861. The regiment was ordered to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 4 AM on 8 July, 1861, and arrived at 10 AM the same day.

Note: The 17th Pennslvania Infantry was temporarily assigned to the Seventh Brigade, Second Division, Army of Pennsylvania, under the command of Colonel General C P Stone, 14th United States Infantry, by Special Orders No.94, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861, and to the Seventh Brigade, Third Division, Army of Pennsylvania, by Special Orders No.96, Paragragh I, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 10 July, 1861.

Martinsburg, Berkeley County, to Charleston, Berkeley County, Virginia, 15-17 July, 1861: The 17th Pennslvania Infantry was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the morning on 15 July, 1861, and arrived in the vicinity of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, the same day. The regiment was ordered to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the morning on 17 July, 1861, and arrived arrived by the Middleway, Charlestown & Harpers Ferry Turnpike via Middleway or Smithfield, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Charleston to Harpers Ferry, Berkeley County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 3 AM on 21 Juy, 1861, and arrived at Bolivar Heights, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, 24 July, 1861: The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by Special Orders No.126, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 23 July, 1861, and proceeded across the Potomac River to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 24 July, 1861. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 9 AM the same day.

Mustered out, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2 August, 1861: The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 23 July, 1861, and arrived at Baltimore City, Maryland, at 7 PM on 24 July, 1861. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at 8 PM the same day and arrived at 9 AM on 25 July, 1861. The 17th Pennsylvania Infantry was mustered out at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 2 August, 1861.
Mustered in United States service for three months 25 April, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 10 May, 1861

Twenty-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry

Col. H L Cake

The 25th Pennsylvania Infantry, Companies A, D, E, G, and H, arrived at Washington, D. C., at 6 PM on 18 April, 1861; Company I, at 4 PM on 15 May, 1861; and Companies F and K at 10 PM on 16 May, 1861. The 25th Pennsylvania Infantry, Companies B and C, were mustered in United States service at Washington, D. C., on 6 June, 1861, dated 3 June, 1861 (See 25th Pennsylvania Infantry).
Companies A, D, E, G, & H arrived at Washington, D. C., 18 April, 1861, and Companies F, I, & K 15-16 May 1861

Rhode Island

First Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery (Providence Marine Corps Artillery)

Capt. C H Tompkins

The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to rendezvous at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

Organisation of 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery, 18 April, 1861: Captain C H Tompkins, First Lieutenant W H Reynolds, Second Lieutenant B Remington, Jr., Third Lieutenant A M Tower

Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, to Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, 18-19 April, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to proceed by the steamer Empire State to Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, in the morning on 18 April, 1861, and arrived the same day. The company was ordered to proceed by the New Jersey Central Railroad to Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, on 19 April, 1861, and arrived at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, via New Hampton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, in the evening on 19 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was assigned six 10 pounder James rifles at the Farmers & Mechanics' Institute Fairgrounds, near Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, between 20 and 26 April, 1861.

Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, to Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, 27-30 April, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Leigh valley Railroad to Washington, D. C., in the afternoon on 27 April, 1861, and arrived by the North Pennsylvania Railroad at Philadelphia via Bethlehem, Lehigh and Northampton Counties, Pennsylvania, in the evening on 28 April, 1861. The company was ordered to proceed by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad to Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, on 29 April, 1861, and arrived on 30 April, 1861.

Perryville, Cecil County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C, 30 April-2 May, 1861:The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to proceed by the steamer Maryland to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 6PM on 30 April, 1861, and arrived at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in the evening on 1 May, 1861. The company was ordered to proceed by the Elkridge & Annapolis Railroad to Washington, D. C., in the morning on 2 May, 1861, and arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at 4 PM the same day. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to the rear of the Interior Department, on Eighth Street, Washington, D. C., on 2 May, 1861.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was stationed at the Baltimore Railroad Depot, on Broad and Prime Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 28 April, 1861, and a detachment of men with the horses was ordered to proceed by the steamer Kill von Kill to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in the evening on 30 April, 1861.

Washington to Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., 2 May, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery arrived at Camp Sprague, near Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., in the afternoon on 2 May, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Capitol grounds, Washington, D. C., 2 May, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was mustered in United States service for three months at the Capitol grounds, Washington, D. C., by Brevet Major & Assistant Adjutant General I McDowell, United States Army, on 2 May, 1861.

Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., to Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 9-10 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, under the command of Colonel A E Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, by Special Orders No.99, Pragraph III, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 8 June, 1861, and proceeded by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at 6 PM on 9 June, 1861. The company was accompanied by First Lieutenant L L Janes, 2nd United States Artillery, Company A, and arrived by the Cumberland Valley Railroad at Chambersburg, Franklin County, via Baltimore City, Maryland, and Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, in the evening on 10 June, 1861.

Chambersburg to Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 11 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, in the morning on 11 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry and Colonel A Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry (See the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry). The company arrived at Camp Duncan, on the Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, three miles southwest of Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, at 12 PM the same day.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was assigned to the First Brigade, First Division, Army of Pennsylvania, under the command of Colonel G H Thomas, 2nd United States Cavalry, on 11 June, 1861 (See the First Brigade, First Division, Army of Pennsylvania).

Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, 15 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, in the morning on 15 June, 1861, and arrived by the Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, two miles east of Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 12 PM the same day.

Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, two miles east of Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, to Falling Waters, Berkeley County, Virginia, 16 June, 1861: Two sections of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery were ordered across the Potomac River at Lemon's Ferry, near Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 11 AM on 16 June, 1861, and arrived at Camp Hitchcock, on the Potomac River, near Falling Waters, Berkeley County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: A section of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was stationed on the Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, two miles east of Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, between 16 and 17 June, 1861, and two sections of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery were ordered to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, in the morning on 17 June, 1861.

Potomac River, near Falling Waters, Berkeley County, Virginia, & Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, two miles east of Williamsport, Washington County, to Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, 17-18 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Washington, D. C., in the morning on 17 June, 1861, and arrived at Boonsboro via Hagerstown and Funkstown, Washington County, Maryland, in the afternoon the same day. The company arrived at Middletown, Frederick County, Maryland, at 5 PM on 17 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry and Colonel A E Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery arrived in the vicinity of Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, at 12 AM on 18 June, 1861, and was ordered to Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, at 4 AM the same day.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived at Boonsboro, Washington County, Maryland, at 3 PM on 17 June, 1861.

Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 18-19 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Washington, D. C., at 7 PM on 18 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry and Colonel A E Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry. The company arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at Washington, D. C., via Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, near Elkridge Landing, and Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 6 AM on 19 June, 1861.

Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., 19 June, 1861 : The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was stationed at Camp Sprague, near Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., on 19 June, 1861.

Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, 1-4 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 6.30 PM on 1 July, 1861, and arrived at 5 PM on 4 July, 1861.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery arrived at Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 5 PM on 4 July, 1861, and was accompanied by the 13th Pennsylvania Infantry (See the Fourth Brigade, Second Division, Army of Pennsylvania).

Martinsburg, Berkeley County, to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, 15-17 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 15 July, 1861, and arrived in the vicinity of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the evening the same day. The company was ordered to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the morning on 17 July, 1861, and arrived via Middleway, Jefferson County, Virginia, the same day.

Charlestown to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 3 AM on 21 Juy, 1861, and arrived the same day.

Note: The 2nd Massachusetts Infantry, Companies B, D, E, F, H, I, and K, and three 13 pounder James Rifles of the 1st Rhode Detached Militia Artillery, were stationed at Maryland Heights, opposite, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, under the command of Colonel G H Gordon, 2nd Massachusetts Infantry, on 25 July, 1861.

Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, 28 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered across the Potomac River to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 28 July, 1861.

Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, 29 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery was ordered to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, by Special Orders No.141, Headquarters, Department of the Shenandoah, Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 29 July, 1861, and proceeded by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in the evening the same day.

Note: The 2nd Rhode Island Light Artillery arrived at Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, at 2 PM on 29 July, 1861 (See the 2nd Rhode Island Light Artillery).

Mustered out, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, 2 August, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery arrived at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 31 July, 1861, and was mustered out on 2 August, 1861.

Note: First Lieutenant W H Reynolds was appointed captain on 6 May, 1861, and was ordered to Providence, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, to organise the 2nd Rhode Island Light Artillery in May 1861. Private J Allen was assigned as an aeronaut to a corps of assistants, under the direction of Brigadier General I McDowell, and was ordered on balloon reconnaissances to ascertain the position of the the Army of the Potomac (See the United States Corps Topographical Engineers, Balloon Detachment). Mustered in United States service for three months 2 May, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 7 April, 1861

Sources

"Perryville, Md., 30 April, 1861 - Captain Tompkins and the Rhode Island Marine Artillery have just arrived here. Six oieces, ninety horses and one hundred and fifty men will be shipped per the Maryland to Annapolis and Washington this evening."

The New York Herald, 30 April, 1861 - The Rhode Island Marine Artillery

"Perryville, Md., 30 April, 1861, 6 P.M. - The Providence Marine Artillery, with their brass field pieces, have just embarked on board the steamer Maryland, and she has sailed for Annapolis. A detachment of the men, with the horses, are embarking on the steamer Kill von Kull, and will sail tonight."

The New York Herald, 1 May, 1861 - Reports from Perryville

"The 8th regiment New York Militia, 1,000 men, under command of Col. Lyons, are encamped in 80 tents on the heights in the rear of the Relay House. The 6th regiment, Massachusetts, are encamped in 108 tents on a high bluff, half a mile west of Relay House, and near the railway. The Boston Light Artillery are doing good service here. They have six pieces, 75 horses, and number 105 men. The first section commands the bridge from a prominence; the second is stationed near the railroad, and within a few rods of the Relay House, and commands the railroad and river. The third has not yet been assigned a position."

The Alexandria Gazette, 13 May, 1861 - U.S. forces at Relay House, 6 P.M., 11 May, 1861

"Yesterday morning, the remainder of the eighth Massachusetts regiment and the Boston Rifles, Capt. Dodd, left in the ten o'clock train for the Relay House."

The National Republican, 15 May, 1861 - Troops for the Relay House

"The following positions, as nearly as we can learn, are occupied by the northern troops in and around Washington: The 5th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Schwarzwealder, 1,100 men, is quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pinckney, 850 men, is quartered in the City of Washington and at Annapolis. The 7th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lefferts, 1,300 men, is encamped on Prospect Hill, a mile from the White House. The 8th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lyons, 960 men, occupy the Relay House, and a detachment is also stationed at Annapolis. The 12th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Butterfield, 950 men, is quartered in the City. The 13th Regiment N.Y.S.M. (Brooklyn), Colonel Smith, 1,100 men, is stationed at Annapolis. The 20th Regiment (Ulster) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pratt, 800 men, is stationed in Washington. The 25th Regiment (Albany) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Bryan, 800 men, is quartered in Washington. The 28th Regiment (Brooklyn) N.Y.S.M., Colonel M. Bennett, 550 men, is quartered in Washington. The 69th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Corcoran, 1,100 men, is quartered on Georgetown Heights, near the college. The 71st Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Vosburgh, 1,100 men, occupy the Navy yard. They also have control of three boats on the river, manned with 75 men each. The Alexandria bridge is also in charge of the 71st, 150 men stationed on the bridge with three pieces of ordnance. The 1st Regiment Firemen Zouaves (Volunteers), Colonel E. E. Ellsworth, 1,015 men, will soon be encamped on Georgetown Heights. They have been quartered in the Capital. Governor Sprague's Rhode Islanders, Colonel Burnside, 1,100 men, are quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment Massachusetts occupies the Relay House, nine miles from Baltimore. The 8th Massachusetts Regiment is quartered in Washington. A Regiment of pennsylvania troops is stationed at the Relay House with the Massachusetts 6th and New York 8th, while the remainder is stationed in Washington. The 4th New jersey Regiment has gone into encampment on Merdian Hill, near the camp of the New York 7th. About 2,700 New Jersey soldiers are quartered in Washington."

The Belmont Chronicle (St Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio), 16 May, 1861 - Positions of Northern troops in the South

"Yesterday afternoon the Marine Artillery of the Rhode Island regiment went off in a special train of cars."

The National Republican, 10 June, 1861 - The movement from Washington

"The Marine Artillery attached to the First Rhode Island Regiment, left the city yesterday evening at 6 1/2 o’clock, per rail - destination unknown."

The Evening Star, 2 July, 1861 – Military movement

"On the Southside of Baltimore are stationed at Annapolis a force between four and five thousand men, including the Providence Marine Artillery, which left Perryville yesterday."

The Evening Star, 2 June, 1861

"This fine regiment, under command of Colonel Nathaniel J. Jackson, and numbering 780 men, arrived here about three o'clock yesterday afternoon, and immediately marched to the quarters prepared for them, sone on Maryland avenue west of the Capital, and others on Pennsylvania avenue near Sixth street."

The National Republican, 4 June, 1861 - The first Maine regiment

"Saturday, the New Hampshire first, Col. Tappan, and New York ninth, Col. Stiles, were at Poolesville, thirty-four miles from Washington."

The National Republican, 24 June, 1861 - The troops up the river

"The majority of our regiment (New Hampshire First, Colonel Tappan,) arrived here yesterday noon. The New York Ninth left here the day before we came - probably for Harpers Ferry."

The Evening Star, 8 July, 1861 - Camp Goodwin, Monocacy, Md., 4 July, 1861

"The First Maine Regiment, Col. Jackson, marched over the Chain Bridge into Virginia, about 5 o'clock Saturday."

The Evening Star, 22 July, 1861 - Advancing into Virginia

"By 9 a. m., Porter had these five companies, comprising 482 officers and men, mustered into the service of the United States, loaded on board a Northern Central Railway train and started for Washington. They had for company on the train forty-five regulars of the 4th Artillery en route for Fort McHenry, under the command of Captain J. C. Pemberton, that recreant son of Pennsylvania who, deserting the flag of his country, joined the Southern Confederacy, became one of its Lieut. Generals, and is now only known to fame as having unconditionally surrendered his command at Vicksburg to General Ulysses S. Grant."

A few acts and actors in the tragedy of the Civil War in the United States, by William Bender Wilson

"The only regular troops near the capital of the country were 300 or 400 marines at the marine barracks, and 3 officers and 53 men of ordnance at the Washington arsenal."

"Stone immediately set to work to organize the volunteers for the preservation of order in the District, and by mid-February was able to report that thirty-three companies of infantry and riflemen and two troops of cavalry were on the lists of the District volunteer force; and all had been uniformed, equipped, and put under frequent drill."

"Washington's or rather the District of Columbia's militia organisations mustered into the service of the United States, from April 9 to April 27, when enlistment solely for the District defense ceased, numbered 34 companies and 3,019 men."

Records of the Columbia Historical Society, Washington, D. C., Volume 60/62 (1960/1962), pp. 123-133: Military activities in Washington in 1861, by Elden E Billings

Rhody Redlegs: A history of the Providence Marine Corps of Artillery and the 103d Field Artillery, Rhode Island National Guard 1801-2010, by Robert Grandchamp, Jane Lancaster, and Cynthia Ferguson

History and complete roster of the Massachusetts regiments, minute men of '61 who responded to the first call of President Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1861, to defend the flag and Constitution of the United States together with photographs and biographical sketches of minute men of Massachusetts, by George W Nason

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 63, Serial No.75: Record of events for First Rhode Island Light Artillery (Three months), May–August 1861, edited by James B Hewett

The Civil War papers of Lt. Colonel Newton T. Colby, New York Infantry, by Newton T Colby

History of the First Regiment of Heavy Artillery, Massachusetts volunteers, formerly the Fourteenth Regiment of Infantry, 1861–1865, by Alfred Seelye Roe and Charles Nutt

History of the First-Tenth-Twenty-ninth Maine Regiment: In service of the United States from 3 May, 1861, to 21 June, 1866, by Maj. John M. Gould

That body of brave men: The U.S. Regular Infantry and the Civil War in the West, by Mark Wells Johnson

The First New York, Lincoln, Cavalry from 19 April, 1861, to 7 July, 1865, by William H Beach, A. M., First Lieutenant and Adjutant

Lincoln's abolitionist general: The biography of David Hunter, by Edward A Miller

First in defense of the Union: The civil war history of the First Defenders, by John D Hoptak

New York in the War of Rebellion, 1861-1865, Volumes 1-4, by Frederick Phisterer

History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-5, prepared in compliance with acts of the legislation, Volume 1, by Samuel P Bates

The First Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers in the Great Rebellion: Containing the story of the campaign; an account of the Great uprising of the people of state, and other articles upon subjects associated with the early war period; map of the route of the regiment; tables; biographies; portraits and illustrations, by Rev. Stephen G Abbott, A M, Chaplin of the regiment

The siege of Washington: The untold story of the twelve days that shook the Union, by John Lockwood and Charles Lockwood

A history of the national capital from its foundation through the period of the adoption of the organic act, Volume 2, by Wilhelmus Bogart Bryan

Historical sketch of the old Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers during its three campaigns in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 containing the history of the several companies previous to 1861, and the name and military record of each man connected with the regiment during the war, by John Wesley Hanson

Massachusetts Register, 1862, containing a record of the Government and Institutions of the State, together with a very complete account of the Massachusetts Volunteers, Serial No.94, by Adams, Sampson & Co.

Biographical register of officers and graduates of the United States Military Academy, at West Point, N.Y., from its establishment, 16 March, 1802, to the Army reorganisation of 1866-67, by Bvt. Major General George W Cullum, Colonel, Corps of Enginers, U.S. Army

Notes

Department of Washington, 9 April-25 July, 1861

Brevet Colonel & Lieutenant Colonel C F Smith, 10th United States Infantry, was assigned to comand the troops in and around Washington, D. C., by General Orders No.1, Headquarters, Troops in Washington, D. C., on 7 April, 1861.

General Orders No.9, Paragraph I, War Department, Washinton, D. C., 9 April, 1861: Brevet Colonel & Lieutenant Colonel C F Smith, 10th United States Infantry, was assigned to command a military department, taken from the Department of the East, and called the Department of Washington, consisting of the State of Maryland, and the District of Columbia according to its original boundary, Headquartes Washington, D. C., by General Orders No.9, Paragraph I, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 9 April, 1861.

General Orders No.12, Paragraph I, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washinton, D. C., 27 April, 1861: Inspector General & Colonel J K F Mansfield, United States Army, was assigned to command the Military Department of Washington including the District of Columbia, according to its original boundary, Fort Washington and the county adjacent, and the State of Maryland as far as Bladensburg, inclusive, Headquarters Washington, D. C., by General Orders No.12, Paragraph I, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 27 April, 1861.

Note: Brevet Colonel & Lieutenant Colonel C F Smith, United States Army, was appointed superintendent of the recruiting service at Fort Columbus, on Governor's Island, New York Harbour, by General Orders No.12, Paragraph IV, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 27 April, 1861.

Department of Northeastern Virginia, 27 May-25 July, 1861

Brevet Major (First Lieutenant) & Assistant Adjutant GeneralI McDowell, United States Army, was appointed brigadier general, United States Army, by General Orders No.64, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 22 August, 1861, dated 14 May, 1861.

General Orders No.26, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., 27 May, 1861: Brigadier General I McDowell, United States Army, was assigned to command a new Military Geographical Department including all the part of Virginia, east of the Allegheny mountains and north of the James River, except Fort Monroe and sixty miles around the same, Headquarters movable according to circumstances, by General Orders No.26, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 27 May, 1861.

Division of the Potomac, 25 July, 1861

Major General G B McClellan, United States Army, assumed command of the Division of the Potomac, comprising the Departments of Washington and Northeastern Virginia, Headquarters Washington, D. C., by General Orders No.1, Headquarters, Division of the Potomac, Washington, D. C., on 27 July, 1861.

General Orders No.47, Paragragh I, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., 25 July, 1861: The counties of Washington and Allegheny in Maryland and such other parts of Virginia as may be covered by the Army in its operations were added to the Department of the Shenandoah; the counties of Prince George, Montgomery, and Frederick were added to the Department of Washington; the remainder of Maryland and all Pennsylvania and Delaware constituted the Department of Pennsylvania, Headquarters at Baltimore City, Maryland; and the Department of Washington and the Department of Northeastern Virginia, constituted a geographical Division, Headquarters Washington, D. C., under the command of Major General G B McClellan, United States Army, by General Orders No.47, Paragragh I, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 25 July, 1861.

Note: Inspector General & Colonel J K F Mansfield, United States Army, was appointed brevet brigadier general and brigadier general, United States Army, by General Orders No.64, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 22 August, 1861, dated 6 and 14 May, 1861, respectively.