The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Militia, Fourth (Reserve) Division

Fourth New Jersey Militia Infantry

Mustered in United States service for three months 27 April, 1861. Arrived at Washington, D. C., 6 May, 1861. Not engaged in the first battle of Bull Run

COLONEL M MILLER, JR.
M Miller, Jr., was appointed colonel, 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, on 27 April, 1861.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL S R STROUD
S R Stroud, was appointed lieutenant colonel, 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, on 27 April, 1861.

MAJOR R C JOHNSON
Captain R C Johnson, 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, Company I, was appointed major, 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, on 27 April, 1861.

Company A Cook Rifles: CAPT. H A PERRINE
The company was accepted in state service at Bordentown, Burlington County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the morning on 24 April, 1861.
Company B National Guards, Burlington Brigade: CAPT. J GALE
The company was accepted at Mount Holly, Burlington County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the morning on 24 April, 1861.
Company C Stockton Cadets, Camden Brigade: CAPT. E G JACKSON
The company was accepted in state service at Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the evening on 24 April, 1861.
Company D (Gloucester) Union Guards: CAPT. J B STRAFFORD
The company was accepted in state service at Gloucester City, Camden County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the evening on 24 April, 1861.
Company E Camden Light Artillery, Camden Brigade: CAPT. I W MICKLE
The company was accepted in state service at Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the evening on 24 April, 1861.
Company F Washington Greys, Camden Brigade: CAPT. E P HUNT
The company was accepted in state service at Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the evening on 24 April, 1861.
Company G Camden Zouaves: CAPT. J R CUNNINGHAM
The company was accepted in state service at Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the evening on 24 April, 1861.
Company H Anderson Guards: CAPT. J P VAN LEER
The company was accepted in state service at Gloucester City, Camden County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the evening on 24 April, 1861.
Company I Johnson Guards: CAPT. C H SINNICKSON
The company was accepted in state service at Salem, Salem County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the afternoon on 25 April, 1861. Captain R C Johnson, 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, Company I, was appointed major, 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, on 27 April, 1861.
Company K Marion Rifles, Burlington Brigade: CAPT. G C BURLING
The company was accepted in state service at Burlington, Burlington County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861, and arrived at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, on 27 April, 1861.

Sources

"Camden County - Two Companies have formed in Gloucester City, the Union Guards, and the American Guards, the former under command of Joseph B. Strafford, and the later James Van Leer, who served in the Mexican War."

The West Jersey Press, 24 April, 1861 - Military spirit

"Yesterday witnessed a large arrival of troops in our city. Three companies, one from Mount Holly, Bordentown and Burlington came in yesterday morning. We did not learn the names of the officers. The following companies arrived last evening, from Camden: Washington Greys, Capt. Hunt; Camden Light Artillery, Capt. I. W. Mickle; Stockton Cadets, Capt. E. G. Jackson; Camden Zouaves, Capt. Cunningham. The Anderson Guards, (a new company) Capt. Van Leer, and Union Guards, Capt. Strafford, came on the same train, from Gloucester City. Each of the above companies numbered about one hundred men. The last named company brought ninety-six men, and forty-four were left behind, not knowing what time the others were to leave. Tomorrow the Marion Rifles, a fine looking company, of Burlington, are expected."

The Trenton state Gazette, 25 April, 1861

"The Johnson Guards, from Salem, 76 men commanded by Captain Robert C. Johnson, also arrived later in the afternoon."

The Trenton State Gazette, 26 April, 1861

"The First regiment, Col. Johnson, the Second, Col. Baker, Third, Col. Napton, will embark here by midday, and joining the Fourth, Col. Miller, at Bordentown, will leave that place at 4 o’clock this afternoon with Brigadier General Runyon and staff; proceeding down the Delaware via the Delaware and Chesapeake Canal to Annapolis and Washington. The troops and stores are in a fleet of fourteen steam propellers, the W. Woodward, Fanny Cadwalader, Ochorara, Delaware, Rariton, Trenton, Patsoon, F. W. Brune, Elizabeth, Franklin, Fannie, J. B. Mallesson, Eureka, and Fanny Gardner."

The Brooklyn daily Eagle, 3 May, 1861 - New Jersey troops, Trenton, 3 May, 1861

"The fourth regiment arrived in the cars at nine o'clock last night, and immediately proceeded to the quarters provided for them over Sibley & Guy's stove warehouse, on D street, west of Tenth. The entire New Jersey brigade numbers 3,200 men, and is commanded by General Theodore Runyon."

The National Republican, 7 May, 1861 - Arrival of the fourth regiment

"The following positions, as nearly as we can learn, are occupied by the northern troops in and around Washington: The 5th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Schwarzwealder, 1,100 men, is quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pinckney, 850 men, is quartered in the City of Washington and at Annapolis. The 7th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lefferts, 1,300 men, is encamped on Prospect Hill, a mile from the White House. The 8th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lyons, 960 men, occupy the Relay House, and a detachment is also stationed at Annapolis. The 12th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Butterfield, 950 men, is quartered in the City. The 13th Regiment N.Y.S.M. (Brooklyn), Colonel Smith, 1,100 men, is stationed at Annapolis. The 20th Regiment (Ulster) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pratt, 800 men, is stationed in Washington. The 25th Regiment (Albany) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Bryan, 800 men, is quartered in Washington. The 28th Regiment (Brooklyn) N.Y.S.M., Colonel M. Bennett, 550 men, is quartered in Washington. The 69th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Corcoran, 1,100 men, is quartered on Georgetown Heights, near the college. The 71st Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Vosburgh, 1,100 men, occupy the Navy yard. They also have control of three boats on the river, manned with 75 men each. The Alexandria bridge is also in charge of the 71st, 150 men stationed on the bridge with three pieces of ordnance. The 1st Regiment Firemen Zouaves (Volunteers), Colonel E. E. Ellsworth, 1,015 men, will soon be encamped on Georgetown Heights. They have been quartered in the Capital. Governor Sprague's Rhode Islanders, Colonel Burnside, 1,100 men, are quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment Massachusetts occupies the Relay House, nine miles from Baltimore. The 8th Massachusetts Regiment is quartered in Washington. A Regiment of pennsylvania troops is stationed at the Relay House with the Massachusetts 6th and New York 8th, while the remainder is stationed in Washington. The 4th New Jersey Regiment has gone into encampment on Merdian Hill, near the camp of the New York 7th. About 2,700 New Jersey soldiers are quartered in Washington."

The Belmont Chronicle (St Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio), 16 May, 1861 - Positions of Northern troops in the South

"The Fourth New Jersey Regiment is now stationed at Gen. Runyon's headquarters, near Roach's Mills."

The Evening Star, 19 July, 1861 - Movement of troops

"Two companies each of the First and Second Regiments had been detached for special duty, while the Third Regiment had been detached temporarily from the Brigade and with the Fourth New Jersey Militia and Colonel J. H. McCunn's New York Regiment formed a provisional brigade under the command of Colonel McCunn, were posted at fairfax Station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, as a reseve, the Third Regiment advancing to Burke's Station to guard ammunition and stores."

History of the First brigade, New Jersey Volunteers from 1861 to 1865, compiled under the authorisation of Kearny's First New Jersey Brigade Society, by Camille Baquet, Second Lieutenant, Company A, First Regiment New Jersey Volunteers

New Jersey and the Rebellion: A history of the service of the troops and people of New Jersey in aid of the Union cause, by John Young Foster

The Union Army: A history of military affairs in the loyal states 1861-65, records of the regiments in the Union Army, cyclopedia of battles, memoirs of commanders and soldiers, Volume 3, New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois and Michigan

Notes

The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry (South Jersey) was accepted in state service at Camp Olden, on Sandtown Road, two and a half miles east of the Trenton Locomotive works and Rolling Mills, near Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, on 17 April, 1861.

Bordentown & Mount Holly, Burlington County, to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, Companies A & B, 24 April, 1861: The Cook Rifles and the National Guards arrived by the Trenton Branch, Camden & Amboy Railroad, at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the morning on 24 April, 1861.

Gloucester City & Camden, Camden County, to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, Companies C, D, E, F, G, & H, 24 April, 1861: The Washington Greys (100), the Camden Light Artillery (100), the Stockton Cadets (100), the Camden Zouaves (100), the (Gloucester) Union Guards (112), and the Anderson Guards (86), were ordered to proceed by the Camden & Amboy Railroad to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, at 4 PM on 24 April, 1861, and arrived by the Trenton Branch, Camden & Amboy Railroad, in the evening the same day.

Note: The (Gloucester) Union Guards and the Anderson Guards were stationed at Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, on 24 April, 1861.

Salem, Salem County, to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, Company I, 25 April, 1861: The Johnson Guards (76), under the command of Captain R C Johnson, arrived by the Trenton Branch, Camden & Amboy Railroad, at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the afternoon on 25 April, 1861.

Burlington, Burlington County, to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, Company K, 25 April, 1861: The Marion Rifles arrived by the Trenton Branch, Camden & Amboy Railroad, at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, on 27 April, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, 27 April, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, by Major T T S Laidley, 5th United States Infantry, and First Lieutenant A T A Torbert, 5th United States Infantry, Company D, on 27 April, 1861.

Note: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861, and the New Jersey (Militia) Brigade was mustered in United States service at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, under the command of Brigadier General T Runyon, Major A V Bonnell, and Captain J B Mulligan, on 27 April, 1861.

Trenton, Mercer County, to Bordentown, Burlington County, New Jersey, 1 May, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by steamers F W Brune and Patroon on the Delaware & Raritan Canal to Bordentown, Burlington County, New Jersey, at 6.30 PM on 1 May, 1861, and arrived on the Delaware River the same day.

Bordentown, Burlington County, New Jersey, to Annapolis Junction, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 3-4 May, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by steamers on the Delaware River to Annapolis, Anne Arundal County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 3 May, 1861, and arrived at Delaware City, New Castle County, Delaware, via Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the evening the same day. The regiment was ordered to Annapolis, Anne Arundal County, Maryland, at 12 PM on 4 May, 1861, and arrived by the Delaware & Chesapeake Canal and Chesapeake Bay at 4 PM the same day.

Note: The 1st New Jersey Militia Infantry, 2nd New Jersey Militia Infantry, 3rd New Jersey Militia Infantry, and 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry were ordered to proceed by the steamers W Woodward, Fannie Cadwalader, Delaware, Franklin, J B Mollison, Eureka, Fanny Garner, Octorata, Raritan, Trenton, Patroon, F W Brune and Elizabeth Turner, to Washington, D. C., under the command of Captain R F Loper, United States Navy, between 1 and 3 May, 1861.

Annapolis Junction, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 5-6 May, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry disembarked at Annapolis, Anne Arundal County, Maryland, in the morning on 5 May, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad to Washington, D. C., on 6 May, 1861. The regiment was accompanied by a company of the 3rd New Jersey State Militia Infantry and arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, via Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 9.30 PM the same day. The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered to Sibley's & Guys stove warehouse, on D Street, Washinton, D. C., on 6 May, 1861.

Washington to Meridian Hill, west of Fourteenth Street, D. C., 9 May, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry arrived at Camp Monmouth, near Meridian Hill, west of Fourteenth Street, D. C., on 9 May, 1861.

Occupation of Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, & Alexandria, Virginia, 24 May, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., at 2 AM on 24 May, 1861, and arrived at the west side of the Alexandria & Washington Turnpike, two miles from the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., the same day (See the Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria).

Fort Runyon, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, 24 May, 1861: Detachments of the 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, was assigned to build Fort Runyon, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, under the supervision of Captain B S Alexander, United States Corps Engineers, at 6 AM on 24 May, 1861 (See the United States Corps Engineers).

Note: Major J G Barnard, Captains B S Alexander and C E Blunt, First Lieutenants F E Prime and D C Houston, Second Lieutenants H M Robert, United States Corps Engineers, and detachments of the 7th New York State Militia Infantry, the 2nd New Jersey Militia Infantry, Companies A, B, C, F, G, and H; the 3rd New Jersey Militia Infantry, and the 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry were stationed at the works near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, 27 May, 1861.

Alexandria & Washington Turnpike to Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, 26 May, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered to Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 26 May, 1861, and arrived at at Camp Van Riper or Princeton, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was stationed at Camp Van Riper or Princeton, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861.

General Orders No.13, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, 8 July, 1861: The 4th New Jersey State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Fourth Division, McDowell's Army, under the command of Brigadier General RT Runyon, New Jersey Volunteers, by General Orders No.13, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861.

Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, to Roach's Mills, Alexandria County, Virginia, 18 July, 1861: The 4th New Jersey State Militia Infantry was ordered to Roach's Mills (Old cotton factory), Alexandria County, Virginia, on 18 July, 1861, and was accompanied by the 2nd New Jersey Militia Infantry (See the 2nd New Jersey Militia Infantry).

Alexandria & Springfield Station to Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: One company of the 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was assigned to guard duty on the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad; one company at Arlington Mills, Alexandria County, Virginia; one company at the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C.; and seven companies on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, between Alexandria and Springfield Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Note: A detachment of the 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry, under the command of Sergeant C J Field, Company F, was assigned to First Lieutenant F E Prime, United States Corps Engineers, on 16 July, 1861 (See the United States Corps Engineers).

Alexandria & Springfield Station to Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: Seven companies of the 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry were ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Note: The 37th New York Infantry and the 3rd New Jersey Infantry were stationed at Fairfax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, under the command of Acting Brigadier General & Colonel J H McCunn, 37th New York Infantry, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Retreat to Washington, D. C., 21-22 July, 1861: After the first battle of Bull Run the 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Alexandria, Virginia, in the morning on 22 July, 1861.

Washington, D. C., to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, 24-26 July, 1861: The 4th New Jersey State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, in the afternoon on 24 July, 1861, and arrived by the Philadelphia and Trenton Railraod at 3 PM on 26 July, 1861.

Mustered out, Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, 31 July, 1861: was mustered out at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, by First Lieutenant A T A Torbert, 5th United States Infantry, Company D, on 31 July, 1861.

Reserves, defenses of Washington, D. C., 21 July, 1861: The 4th New Jersey Militia Infantry was assigned to the defenses of Washington, D. C., under the command of Brigadier General T Runyon, during and immediately after the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.

Brigadier General T Runyon, New Jersey Volunteers, Fourth (Reserve) Division, McDowell's Army: Brigadier General T Runyon, New Jersey Volunteers, was discharged by General Orders No.46, Paragraph III, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 19 July, 1861, dated 30 July, 1861.