The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Camp Pickens, army of the Potomac

Virginia Militia

Stationed within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861

COLONEL G H TERRETT, Provisiona Army of Virginia

First Brigade, Second Division, Virginia Militia

Brigadier General J L Kemper
Brigadier J L Kemper, First Brigade, Second Division, Virginia Militia, was appointed colonel, 7th Virginia Infantry, on 2 May, 1861 (See the 7th Virginia Infantry).

Culpeper County

Fifth Virginia Militia

Col. C H Wager

The 5th Virginia Militia (Culpeper County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 15 July, 1861. The order was countermanded and the 5th Virginia Militia was stationed at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861.

Note: The 5th Virginia Militia (Culpeper County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Organisation of 5th Virginia Militia (Culpeper County): Colonel C H Wager; Company E, Captain S Jones; Unlettered Company, Captain Fry

Rapppahanock County

Thirty-fourth Virginia Militia

Col. W W Deatherage

The 34th Virginia Militia (Rappahannock County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 18 July, 1861. The 34th Virginia Militia (Rappahannock County) was stationed at Camp Deatherage, Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861, and was ordered to Rappahhannock County, Virginia, on 27 July, 1861, dated 24 July, 1861. The 34th Virginia Militia (Rappahannock County) was disbcharged on 28 July, 1861.

Note: The 34th Virginia Militia (Rappahannock County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Organisation of 34th Virginia Militia (Rappahannock County): Colonel W W Deatherage, Lieutenant Colonel B F Kinsey, Major C B Maddox; Company A, Captain W A Latourandais; Company B, Captain W R Deatherage; Company C, Captain J W Fletcher; Company D, Captain J W Waldon

Orange County

Third Virginia Militia

Col. B F Nalle

The 3rd Virginia Militia (Orange County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was stationed at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, eight miles southwest of Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 21 July 1861.

Note: The 3rd Virginia Militia (Orange County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Organisation of 3rd Virginia Militia (Orange County): Colonel B F Nalle; Unlettered Company, Captain R P Graves

Note: Colonel B F Nalle, 3rd Virginia Militia (Orange County), was appointed captain, 13th Virginia Infantry, Company A, at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 15 May, 1861 (See the 13th Virginia Infantry).

Madison County

Eighty-second Virginia Militia

Col. J W Twyman

The 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was ordered to rendezvous at Madison Courthouse, Madison County, Virginia, by Colonel J W Twyman, 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County), on 17 July, 1861. The 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 19 July, 1861, and was stationed at Camp Johnson, Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861. The 82nd Virginia Militia was discharged at Camp Johnson, Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 13 August, 1861.

Note: The 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Organisation of 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County): Colonel J W Twyman; Lieutenant Colonel S Carpenter, Major E F Blankenbecker; Company A, Captain W Thomas; Company B, Captain J C Crigler; Company C, Captain J B Hill; and Company D, Captain M W Yager

Note: Colonel J W Twyman, 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County), organised the Richardson Guards at Madison Courthouse, Madison County, Virginia, on 25 April, 1861, and was mustered in state service for one year at Camp Henry, C George's, northwest of Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, by Lieutenant Colonel A S Taylor, Provisional army of Virginia, on 13 May, 1861 (See the 7th Virginia Infantry). Major E F Blankenbecker, 82nd Virginia Militia (Madison County), was appointed captain, 10th Virginia Infantry, Company L, on 12 August, 1861 (See the 10th Virginia Infantry).

Greene County

One Hundred and Fifth-fifth Virginia Militia

Col. J F Offield

The 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was ordered to rendezvous at Gordonsville, Orange County, Virginia, at 9 AM on 14 July, 1861. The 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County) arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, the same day and the 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County) (284) was stationed at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, between 17 July and 19 July, 1861.

Note: The 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Manassas Junction, Prince William County, & Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, 18 July, 1861: The unorganised portions of the 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County), under the command of Captain J L Thornton, 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County), were ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 4 PM on 18 July, 1861, and were assigned to Cadet W P Shipp, Virginia Military Institute, at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, between 18 and 19 July, 1861.

Note: The unorganised portions of the 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County) were telegraphed as derserters at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, but were acquitted by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 18 July, 1861.

Organisation of 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County): Colonel J F Offield, Major B A McMullan; Unlettered Company, Captain J G E Davis; Unlettered Company, Captain J L Thornton; Unlettered Company, Captain R H Webb

Note: The 155th Virginia Militia (Greene County), Davis' Company, under the command of Captain J G E Davis, was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery, under the command of Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, Confederate States Army, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861 (See the Battalion Heavy Artillery).

Fifth Brigade, Second Division, Virginia Militia

Brigadier General E Hunton
Brigadier E Hunton, Fifth Brigade, Second Division, Virginia Militia, was appointed colonel, 8th Virginia Infantry, on 8 May, 1861 (See the 8th Virginia Infantry).

Fauquier County

Forty-eighth Virginia Militia

Col. H T Gibson

The 48th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County) was not ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861.

Eighty-fifth Virginia Militia

Col. J E Scruggs

The 85th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861.

Note: The 85th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Regimental muster, Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, 85th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County) , 31 May, 1861: The 85th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County) was ordered to muster at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, on 31 May, 1861.

Organisation of 85th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County): Colonel J E Scruggs; Unlettered Company, Captain G K Royall

Note: Colonel J E Scruggs, 85th Virginia Militia (Fauquier County), was captured at We(a)verton, Washington County, Maryland, on 22 July, 1863, and died of dysentery at Johnson's Island, Sandusky Bay, three miles north of Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, on 9 November, 1863.

Prince William County

Thirty-six Virginia Militia

Col. W G Brawner

The 36th Virginia Militia (Prince William County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was ordered to Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861.

Note: The 36th Virginia Militia (Prince William County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Organisation of 36th Virginia Militia (Prince William County): Colonel W G Brawner; Company A, Captain (?); Company C, Captain (?); Company D, Captain (?); Company E, Captain (?)

Note: The Prince William Partisan Rangers, 15th Virginia Cavalry, Company H, was organised by Colonel W G Brawner, 36th Virginia Militia (Prince William County) on 19 September, 1862.

Sixth Brigade, Second Division, Virginia Militia

Brigadier General R L Wright

Loudoun County

Fifty-six Virginia Militia

Col. W Giddings

The 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was ordered to rendezvous at Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 15 July, 1861. The 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 19 July, 1861, and was stationed at Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861. The 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to Wheatland, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 26 July, 1861.

Note: The 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861. Over half of the 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) deserted to Maryland prior to muster in Confederate service on 15 July, 1861, and the 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was mustered in Confederate service at Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861.

Regimental muster, Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County), 31 May, 1861: The 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to muster at Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 31 May, 1861.

Manassas Junction, Prince William County, & Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, 29 July & 3 August, 1861: The 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 29 July, 1861, and to Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 3 August, 1861.

Organisation of 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County): Colonel W Giddings, Lieutenant Colonel T W White, Major J S Bascue; Company D (Waterford), Captain R W Thomas; Company E (Hoysville), Captain L T Jones; Company G (Lovettsville), Captain A J Everhart; Company H (Neersville), Captain J F Waters

Active service, Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia, detachments of Companies D, E, & G, 15 July, 1861: A detachment of the 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) (20), Company D, was accepted in Confederate service at Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia; a detachment of Company E (4); and a detachment of Company G (10) on 15 July, 1861.

Note: A detachment of the 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) (50), Company G, under the command of Captain A J Everhart, deserted to Sandy Hook, Washington County, Maryland, on 17 July, 1861, and Captain R W Thomas, 56th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County), Company D, was appointed wagon master at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 23 July, 1861.

Cheek's Ford, on the Potomac River, one mile north of the mouth of the Monocacy River, half a mile north of Spink's Ferry, on the Potomac River, Frederick County, Maryland, 21 July, 1861: A company of militia from Goresville, Loudoun County, Virginia, under the command of Quartermaster C Belt, was assigned to guard duty at Cheek's Ford, on the Potomac River, one mile north of the mouth of the Monocacy River, half a mile north of Spink's Ferry, on the Potomac River, Frederick County, Maryland, on 21 July, 1861.

Fifty-seventh Virginia Militia

Col. A T M Rust

The 57th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was stationed at Leesburg, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 24 July, 1861.

Note: The 57th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861. Colonel S J Ramey, 57th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County), resigned prior to the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861, and Colonel AT M Rust, 57th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County), was assigned to command the 19th Virginia Infantry by Special Orders No.231, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 1 December, 1861, dated 20 November, 1861 (See the 19th Virginia Infantry).

Regimental muster, Leesburg Loudoun County, Virginia, 57th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County), 1 June, 1861: The 57th Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to muster at Leesburg, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 1 June, 1861.

One Hundred and Thirty-second Virginia Militia

Col. L ChancellorM

The 132nd Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861, and was ordered to Haymarket, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.121, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861.

Note: The 132nd Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Regimental muster, Union, Loudoun County, Virginia, 132nd Virginia Militia (Loudoun County), 30 May, 1861: The 132nd Virginia Militia (Loudoun County) was ordered to muster at Union, Loudoun County, Virginia, on 30 May, 1861.

Fairfax County

Sixtieth Virginia Militia

Col. J S Stone

The 60th Virginia Militia (Fairfax County) was ordered in Confederate service by Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, on 9 July, 1861.

Note: The 60th Virginia Militia (Fairfax County) was reorganised at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 7 August, 1860.

Regimental muster, Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 60th Virginia Militia (Fairfax County), 16 May, 1861: The 60th Virginia Militia (Fairfax County) was ordered to muster at Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 16 May, 1861.

Organisation of 60th Virginia Militia (Fairfax County): Colonel J S Stone, Lieutenant Colonel H Jenkins, First Major H L Howard, Second Major J C Kincheloe

Note: The 60th Virginia Militia (Fairfax County) was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 9 July, 1861, and was called out and ordered to rendezvous at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Governor of Virginia J Letcher, on 13 July, 1861.

Sources

"On Friday last, (12th,) Col. Offield, of the 155th, called out all the citizens of the county between the ages of 18 and 45, and after drilling them for a short time, notified them to be at Gordonsville (distant 30 miles from many parts of the county) by 9 o'clock on Sunday, the 14th. I was at Gordonsville at the time mentioned and was struck by the fact that before the arrival of the down train, every Greene man was on the train to Manassas, and ready to report to Gen. Beauregard."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 18 July, 1861 - Greene County, 15 July, 1861

"Captains of volunteer companies are authorised to recruit their companies fom the Militia of their respective counties, called into service, to the maximum number prescribed by the laws of the State of Virginia from companies that are without officers."

Sepcial Orders No.116, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, 16 July, 1861

"Despite orders signed by Governor Letcher on 13 July for Loudoun's entire militia to report to General Beauregard's headquarters, only the 132nd Regiment under Col. Lorman Chancellor reached Manassas on a more or less timely basis, and then only after the fighting there had ended. Meanwhile, Col. Sanford Ramey resigned as head of the 57th and was replaced by General Wright’s former brigade inspector, Armistead T. M. Rust, but the regiment was still in Loudoun as of 24 July."

"In his diary, Lovettsville farmer Christian Nisewaner noted that what remained of the 56th was called up on 17 July and told to begin preparation for a march to 'the Junction' two days later, causing great anxiety amoung the young men's families."

"Although the regular Loudoun militia took no direct part in the first major bloodletting of the war, the county's volunteer companies were involved, including the Loudoun Guard, the Loudoun Artillery, Welby Carter's cavalry and the 8th Virginia Infantry."

Between Reb and Yank: A Civil War history of northern Loudoun County, Virginia, by Taylor M Chamberlin & John M Souders

"I got a letter from Dr. Quisenbury today - He is well - says the militia has been ordered out in that county (Orange) and were at Mitchells Station (Culpeper) County two weeks but have been sent home again."

Repairing the March of Mars - The Civil War diaries of John Samuel Apperson, hospital steward in the Stonewall brigade, 1861-1865, by John Samuel Apperson, John Herbert Roper

"To make assurance doubly sure, and to enable him to put every available trained soldier in the field, Beauregard induced Mr. Davis to call out for a brief service all the militia of the counties adjacent to Manassas. The militia were to remain in the entrenched camp which the regular troops had vacated when they marched out to bivouac on the line of Bull Run."

Beauregard and the militia colonel: Lipincott's Magazine of popular literature and science, Volume 10, July 1872, by J B Lippincott & co

"At the final adjournment of the convention in June, after the passage of the ordinance of secession, he returned to his home and took command of the 36th Regiment of Virginia Militia, which was called into the field shortly before the battle of Bull Run, July 19th."

The University memorial: Biographical sketches of alumni of the University of Virginia who fell in the Confederate War, five Volumes in one, by Rev John Lipscomb Johnson, B A

"The first consignment of raw 'ringed, straked and striked' and ununiformed militia from Greene County arrived here today without arms (save here and there a shotgun) and were sent on towards Alexandria – I cannnot see of what use they will be except to consume meat and bread, unless they are armed with pickaxes and shovels to throw up intrenchments for the volunteer's protection."

The King Family Papers, manuscript, 1811-1890: Captain W King, Saltville Light Artillery, 14 July, 1861, Manassas Junction

"Josiah B. Bowman of Vienna escaped conscription as well. I tried to stay right here and keep as quiet as possible until the Confederates pulled back to Manassas before Firts Manassas. I heard we were to be conscripted or put into the militia and I came to Washington and stayed until the [Confederate] army went back."

The Civil War in Fairfax County: Civilians and soldiers, by Charles V Mauro

"In order to be prepared for an emergency, the Governor of Virginia had called the militia from the counties adjacent to Manassas to assemble at that place. That included my county. I joined the militia and marched to Manassas, arriving there a few days before the battle."

"Every available man was called from the camp, and a second line of defense was formed, behind which the retreating army could rally and make another stand."

From Bull Run to Appomattox: A boy's view, by L W Hopkins

"The combined forces of Beauregard and Johnston had included forty-one full and two incomplete regiments, and three battalions of infantry; two regiments, one battalion, and ten independent companies of cavalry; one battalion and nine separate batteries of light artillery; and one militia battalion with heavy artillery – a total of 35,207 men. Of this army, eight regiments of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, two incomplete regiments of infantry, six field batteries, the heavy artillery, and an indeterminable part of independent cavalry companies were Virginian."

R. E. Lee, Volume 1, by Douglas S Freeman

"I am glad to see that the Governor has called out all the remaining militia, in mass, of this and 8 other adjacent counties. This will not only add much to our military force, but will throw some of the war burdens stay at home and shun them." 12 July, 1861

Diary of Edmund Ruffin: The years of hope, April, 1861-June, 1863, by Edmund Ruffin

"Report to General Beauregard at Manassas Junction, as heretofore ordered by Adjutant General: Greene, Orange, Madison, Culpeper, Rappahannock, Fauquier, Prince William, Loudoun, Fairfax."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 17 July, 1861 - By the Governor of Virginia, a proclamation

"I see the militia are called out. Some have reported here, and the first duty they had to perform was to take hold of spades and the like and throw up entrenchments. It is good for them. Why don't they join some of the numerous companies of the First Regiment at Manassas? There are four companies at least that have not their entire complement of men. Captains Boggs, Taylor, Griswold, Sherman, Lee, and others would be glad to swell their numbers, and brave men, we would think, would not hesitate to join these rather than militia companies."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 18 July, 1861 - Special correspondence, Camp Pickens, 15 July, 1861

"The reign of terror in Loudoun county is at its height. Notices of a militia muster for to-day were given on Saturday, when citizens were told to be ready to be drafted into the militia for an immediate march to Manassas Junction, to fill up the ranks of Gen. Beauregard's forces."

The Baltimore Sun, 16 July, 1861 - Telegraphic dispatch from Washington D. C., 15 July, 1861

"On July 9, Confederate Adjutant General Samuel Cooper asked him to mobilise the militia of the northcentral area of the state at Manassas Junction. Despite vigorous complaints about earlier militia calls from the affected areas, Letcher assented, and before leaving for the northwest on July 11, he instructed his aides to cooperate with all Confederate militia calls."

"On July 19, President Davis requested an additional militia call in the Shenandoah County area to free General Joseph Johnston's troops to reinforce Beauregard at Manassas. The militia call of July 15 had stirred up much resentment among freedom-loving Virginians who felt that the state had already done more than its fair share."

John Letcher of Virginia: The story of Virginia's Civil War Governor, by F N Boney

"About the time of the Bull Run engagement, Loudoun County's 56th militia regiment, from west of the Catoctin Mountains, reported that 400 of its 850 members had deserted into Maryland, including three or four companies."

Confederate engineer: Training and campaigning with John Morris Wampler, by George G Kundahl

"With help of slave labour supplied by the neighbouring planters, he erected several considerable earthworks in front of the junction; later he placed these under the command of Colonel Terrett, who was given about a thousand local militia to man the works, and some naval officers to see to the serving of the guns."

"A battalion of Virginia militia, Colonel Wilcox (within the defences of Manassas)."

Bull Run: Its strategy and tactics, by R M Johnston

"To these I can oppose but about 16,500, reserving about 1500, merely for camp guards, pickets, and the garrison of the intrenched camp here."

The military operations of General Beauregard in the War Between the States, 1861 to 1865, including a brief personal sketch and a narrative of his services in the war with Mexico, 1846-8, Volume 1, by Alfred Roman

For home and honour: The story of Madison County, Virginia, during the War Between the States 1861-1865, by Harold R Woodward, Jr.

Notes

The Virginia Militia of the counties adjacent to Manassas, Prince William County, Virginia, including Culpeper, Fairfax, Fauquier, Greene, Loudoun, Madison, Orange, Prince William, and Rappahannock were called out by Governor J Letcher on 9 July, 1861, and were ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861.

Note: The 175th Virginia Militia (Alexandria County) was disbanded on 24 May, 1861 (See the Garrison at Alexandria).

Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia: Brevet Major & Captain G H Terrett, United States Marine Corps, resigned on 22 April, 1861, and arrived at Richmond, Virginia, on 25 April, 1861. He was appointed colonel, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 27 April, 1861, and assigned to command Alexandria, Virginia, and the troops from the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Fauquier, Virginia, by Special Orders No.39, Paragraph I, Headquarters of the Division, Richmond, Virginia, on 10 May, 1861. Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, evacuated Alexandria, Virginia, in the morning on 24 May, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, at 11 AM the same day. He was assigned to command the Fourth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No. 20, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861, and to command Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.92, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861 (See the Fourth Brigade, Army of the Potomac). Colonel G H Terrett was appointed major, Confederate States Marine Corps, on 22 August, 1861.

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT No.84, Part I: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), pp484-504
Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, Army of the Potomac, and resulting correspondence, Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 14 October, 1861, dated Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 26 August, 1861