The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Camp Pickens, Army of the Potomac

Captain R A Hardaway, Independent Alabama Volunteers

Captain R A Hardaway, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry

Battalion Heavy Artillery

Mustered in Confederate service for the war 21, 23, 24, June, and for one year dated 1 July, 1861. Arrived at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, between 5 May and 13 July, 1861. Stationed within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 21 July 1861

COLONEL S JONES
Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, Army of the Potomac, was assigned to command the Battalion Heavy Artillery at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph VI, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861, and was appointed colonel, artillery, Confederate States Army, on 8 July, 1861.

Company Unlettered Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry: CAPT. R A Hardaway
The company was accepted in state service at Hatchechubbee, Russell County, Alabama, on 1 June, 1861, and was stationed at Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia, on 15 June, 1861. The company was ordered to Lynchburg, Virginia, on 15 June, 1861, dated 12 June, 1861, and arrived by the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad via Knoxville, Knox County, and Bristol, Sullivan County, Tennessee, on 20 June, 1861. The company was mustered in Confederate service for the war as infantry at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 21 June, 1861.

Note: Captain R A Hardaway, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, was assigned to command Batteries A, (B), and C within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861.

Assignment within entrenched naval batteries, 13 July, 1861: Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers was assigned to Batteries A and C, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Commander F Chatard, Confederate States Navy, by Special Orders No.111, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861 (See the Entrenched Naval Batteries).

Company Unlettered North Sumter Rifles: Capt. A S Van de Graaf
The company was organised at Warsaw, Sumter County, Alabama, on 25 April, 1861, and was accepted in Confederate service for the war at Gainesville, Sumter County, Alabama, on 26 May, 1861. The company was stationed at Gainesville, Sumter County, Alabama, on 11 June, 1861, and was ordered to Lynchburg, Virginia, on 16 June, 1861, dated 6 June, 1861. The company arrived by the Mobile & Ohio Railroad at Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi,  on 17 June, 1861, and was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 23 June, 1861.

Note: A S Van de Graaf was appointed captain, North Sumter Rifles, on 20 May, 1861, and trendered their services at Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, on 28 May, 1861. The North Sumter Rifles (101) was stationed at Scooba (Station), on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad, Kemper County, Mississippi, on 16 June, 1861.

Assignment within entrenched naval batteries, 13 July, 1861: The North Sumter Rifles was assigned to Batteries D and G, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of First Lieutenant W A Webb, Confederate States Navy, by Special Orders No.111, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, on 13 July, 1861, and a detachment of twenty-nine men of the North Sumter Rifles and the Madison Artillery or Tips was assigned to Battery I, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of First Lieutenant J Valentine, Confederate States Army, by Special Orders No.111, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861 (See the Entrenched Naval Batteries).

Note: First Lieutenant J Valentine, Confederate States Army, was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.43, Headquarters, Departmeny of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861.

Company Unlettered Madison Tipperarys: Capt. G V Moody
The company was accepted in Confederate service for the war at New Carthage, Madison Parish, Louisiana, on 23 May, 1861, and arrived by the Mobile & Ohio Railroad at Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi, on 17 June, 1861. The company was mustered in Confederate service for the war as infantry at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 23 June, 1861.

Note: The Madison Tipperarys was stationed at Richmond, Madison Parish, Louisiana, on 1 June, 1861, and at Meridian, Lauderdale County, Mississippi, on 17 June, 1861.

Assignment within entrenched naval batteries, 13 July, 1861: The Madison Tipperarys was assigned to Batteries N and P, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of First Lieutenant J W Bennett, Confederate States Navy, by Special Orders No.111, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, on 13 July, 1861, and a detachment of twenty-nine men of the Madison Tipperarys and the North Sumter Rifles were assigned to Battery I, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of First Lieutenant J Valentine, Confederate States Army, by Special Orders No.111, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861 (See the Entrenched Naval Batteries).

Note: The Madison Tipperarys was temporarily assigned to the 49th Virginia Infantry by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861, and was stationed at Battery N, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 7 September, 1861.

Company Unlettered Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery: CAPT. T TRIPLETT
The company was accepted in state service at Alexandria, Virginia, on 22 April, 1861, and was mustered in state service for one year by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 25 April, 1861 (See the Garrison at Alexandria). The company was assigned to the Alexandria Battalion Volunteers, under the command of Major M D Corse, Old Dominion Rifles, the same day and was stationed at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Major C Boyle, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 8 May, 1861. The company was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.92, Paragraph VI, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Assignment within entrenched naval batteries, 13 July, 1861: The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery was assigned to Batteries R and S, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of First Lieutenant L Lyne, Provisional Navy of Virginia, by Special Orders No.111, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861 (See the Entrenched Naval Batteries).

Note: Assistant Gunner W King, Lynchburg Artillery, was assigned to command one 32 pounder piece within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861 (See the Lynchburg Artillery).

Company Unlettered Greene Rough and Readys: CAPT. ST CLair T DEANE
The company was accepted in state service at Stanardsville, Greene County, Virginia, on 11 May, 1861, and was ordered to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 6 June, 1861, dated 3 June, 1861. The company was stationed at Camp Henry, C George's, northwest of Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 8 June, 1861, and was mustered in state service for one year at Camp Henry, C George's, northwest of Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, by Lieutenant Colonel A S Taylor, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 11 June, 1861. The company was stationed at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861, and was assigned to the 4th Virginia Heavy Artillery, Company D, under the command of Colonel J T Goode, Lieutenant Colonel R Harrison and Major J W Leigh, at Chaffin's Bluff, Henrico County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.112, Adjutant & Inspetor General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 15 May, 1862. The 4th Virginia Heavy Artillery was assigned as infantry by Special Orders No.118, Adjutant & Inspetor General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 23 May, 1862, and was redesignated the 34th Virginia Infantry, Company D, by Special Orders No.56, Adjutant & Inspetor General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 8 March, 1864. The 34th Virginia Infantry surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

Organisation of Greene Rough and Readys, Stanardsville, Greene County, Virginia, 17 May, 1861: Captain St Clair Deane, First Lieutenant L B McMullan, Second Lieutenant J A Gentry

Assignment within entrenched naval batteries, 13 July, 1861: The Greene Rough and Readys was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, by Special Orders No.111, Paragraph VII, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861 (See the Entrenched Naval Batteries).

Note: The Greene Rough and Readies was listed as the 2nd Virginia Battalion Heavy Artillery, Company B, in the personal papers of John C Jefferies, on 30 June, 1861.

Company Unlettered 155th Virginia Militia Infantry (Greene County): CAPT. J G E Davis
The company arrived at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 14 July, 1861, and was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery within entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, by Special Orders No.122, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861 (See the Virginia Militia Battalion Infantry).
Madison Heavy Artillery: Capt. G E Bouton
The company was mustered in state service at Madison Courthouse, Madison County, Virginia, on 25 May 1861, and was stationed at Camp Henry, C George's, northwest of Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County Virginia, on 16 June, 1861. The company was mustered in Confederate service at Camp Henry, C George's, northwest of Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County Virginia, dated 1 July, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Yorktown, York County, Virginia, on 2 July, 1861. The company was stationed at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861, and was assigned to the Naval Battery at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, under the command of Major General D H Hill, Confederate States Army, on 22 August, 1861. Second Lieutenant J J Fray, Madison Heavy Artillery, was appointed captain, Madison Heavy Artillery, on 21 May, 1862, and the company was assigned to the 4th Virginia Heavy Artillery, Company L, at Chaffin's Bluff, Henrico County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.112, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 15 May, 1862. The company was disbanded, under the command of Captain J J Fray, by Special Orders No.124, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 14 July, 1862, and the men and horses assigned to the 4th Virginia Heavy Artillery, Companies B, Mecklenburg Heavy Artillery, and D, the Greene Rough and Readys the same day.
Mobile Pulaski Rifles: CAPT. G Gorff
The company was accepted in Confederate service at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on 2 June, 1861, and was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 22 June, 1861. The company was stationed at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lyncnburg, Virginia, under the temporary command of Captain R A Hardaway, Independent Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, on 1 July, 1861, and on the James River, east of Hollywood Cemetery, Oregon Hill, Richmond, Virginia, on 11 July, 1861. Captain G Gorff, Mobile Pulaski Rifles, was temporarily assigned to the 1st Special Battalion Louisiana Infantry on 21 July, 1861, and his resignation was accepted by Special Orders No.121, Paragraph I, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 12 August, 1861, dated 5 August, 1861 (See the 1st Special Battalion Louisiana Infantry).

Note: Information on the Pulaski Rifles was supplied by Julie Nichols at the Broadfoot Publishing Company (See the Broadfoot Publishing Company).

Fifth Alabama Battalion Infantry (Formerly Eighth Alabama Battalion Infantry)

Lieut. Col. F B Shepherd

Company A North Sumter Rifles: Capt. A S Van de Graaf
The company was accepted in Confederate service for the war at Gainesville, Sumter County, Alabama, 26 May, 1861, and was assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company A, at Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, on 24 January, 1862. Captain A S Van de Graaf was appointed major, 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, on 26 June, 1862, and First Lieutenent W Ritter, 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company A, was appointed captain, 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company A, on 4 September, 1862.
Company B Calhoun Sharpshooters: Capt. T B Bush
The company was accepted in Confederate service at Jacksonville, Calhoun County, Alabama, on 13 August, 1861, dated 19 August, 1861, and was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Richmond, Virginia, by Second Lieutenant W R Bullock, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 26 August, 1861. The company was assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company B, at Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, on 24 January, 1862.

Note: T Bush was appointed second lieutenant, infantry, Confederate States Army, at Jacksonville, Calhoun County, Alabama, on 21 May, 1861.

Company C White Plains Rangers: Capt. E T Smyth
The company was accepted in Confederate service at White Plains, Calhoun County, Alabama, on 3 September, 1861, and was mustered in Confederate service for the war on 9 September, 1861. The company was assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company C, at Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, on 24 January, 1862.
Company D Daniel Boone Rifles: Capt. A Covington
The company was accepted in Confederate service at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on 25 May, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern Railroad to Richmond, by Special Orders No.59, Paragraph VII, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, on 10 June, 1861, dated 25 May, 1861. The company was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 25 June, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.249, Paragraph IV, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 13 August, 1861. The company was temporarily assigned to the 1st Texas Infantry, Company K (1st), by Special Orders No.250, Paragraph I, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 14 August, 1861, and to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Compamy D, on 12 March, 1862 (See the 1st Texas Infantry). The company was disbanded, under the command of Captain C M Hooper, by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph II, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 23 May, 1863.

Note: Second Lieutenant C M Hooper, 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company D, was appointed captain, 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company D, on 13 September, 1862.

Company E Howell Guards: Capt. G W Parkhill
The company was accepted in Confederate service at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, on 20 August, 1861, and was mustered in Confederate service for three years on 21 August, 1861, dated 13 May, 1861. The company was ordered to Richmond, Virginia, on 27 August, 1861, and arrived at Rocketts Old Field, Richmond, Virginia, on 2 September, 1861. The company was ordered to proceed by the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad to Evansport, on the Potomac River, three and a half miles east of Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.162, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 27 September, 1861, and arrived at Brooke's Station, Stafford County, Virginia, in the evening the same day. The company was ordered to Evansport, on the Potomac River, three and a half miles east of Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, in the morning on 28 September, 1861, and arrived at 4 PM the same day. The company was stationed at the old Shipping Point Battery, Shipping Point, at the junction of Quantico Creek and Potomac River, three and a half miles east of Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, between 28 September, 1861, and 7 March, 1862, and was temporarily assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel H H Walker, on 18 April, 1862. The company was assigned to the 2nd Florida Infantry, Company M, under the command of Colonel E A Perry, two miles south of Richmond, Virginia, on 20 June, 1862.

Note: The Howell Guards was temporarily assigned to the 55th Virginia Infantry between 18 April and 20 June, 1862.

Company F Alexander's Heavy Artillery: Capt. J F Alexander
The company was accepted or mustered in Confederate service for two years or the war at Fredericksburg, Virginia, by Major & Acting Inspector General W H Ker, Confederate States Army, on 13 March, 1862, and was assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry between 1 May on 10 June, 1862. The company was assigned to the 55th Virginia Infantry, Company M, on 10 June, 1862.

Note: J F Alexander was appointed first lieutenant, Fredericksburg Artillery, under the command of Captain T A Curtis, at Fredericksburg, Virginia, on 23 April, 1861, and was on special duty at the naval batteries at Aquia Creek Landing, at the junction of Aquia Creek and Potomac River, Stafford County, Virginia, on 31 August, 1861. First Lieutenant J F Alexander, Fredericksburg Artillery, was appointed captain, Alexander's Heavy Artillery, between 25 March and 1 May, 1862.

The 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry was organised at Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, under the temporary command of Lieutenant Colonel F B Shepherd, by Special Orders No.250, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 24 January, 1862, dated 2 December, 1861, and surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, under the command of Captain W Ritter, on 9 April, 1865.

Sources

"For the first time an attempt was made to form us into a regiment. Two companies from Calhoun County, Ala., one from Mobile, and our company, making four, were organized into a battalion and was known as the Fifth Alabama Battalion of Infantry. Our old guns were exchanged for muskets. These muskets were old flint and steel guns of the Revolutionary War, and had been changed into percussion guns by removing the flints, plugging up the powder holes at the powder pans, and putting in tubes and hammers to match. Captain Vandegraaf of our company was made Major and put in command."

'We were soon to see actual fighting. An order was issued to our battalion to lay aside our muskets and take charge of some heavy guns in the earthen forts erected at Manassas. These forts were made of earth thrown up pretty high with openings at intervals for the thirty-two pound guns. These openings were thought to be well protected by bags filled with sand which were stacked up on either side of the embrasures. It was expected that these fortifications would be a protection for Gen. Beauregard's rear, and in case he was driven back this would afford a rallying point. Every day, twice a day, for hours at a time we were drilled to load and run these big guns out at the embrasures on trucks, fire, retire the guns, reload, etc., until we became proficient. This work, of course, became monotonous, but there was no let up, we were kept at it up till the time of the big battle. I was made captain of one of the gun crews and it was my duty to command them, sight and fire the cannon, have it mopped out, reload, etc."

War reminiscences of William F Fulton, 5th Alabama Battalion, Archer's Brigade, A. P. Hill's Light Division, by William Frierson Fulton, Jr.

"He commanded the heavy artillery at Manassas until evacuated, then assigned to light artillery."

History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, p1841, Volume 4, Hardaway, Robert Archelus, by Thomas McAdory Owen

"July 6 – Four companies left Lynchburg, Virginia on July 4, and arrived July 5 and were assigned to artillery service under Chief of Artillery. He has commanded batteries A, B, and C, in the entrenched camp at Manassas, since July 6. This company is attached to the garrison at Manassas as heavy artillery. The battalion or detachment is made up of two Virginia companies, which were received with less than the minimum number. One other full company from Alabama and Captain George Moody’s Louisiana Volunteers, the latter awaiting horses and guns, to go into light artillery. This detachment had been successively under Colonel (Samuel) Jones, Colonel Pendleton, and Captain Isaac (S.) Sterrett, Confederate Navy, who is permanent commandant of batteries in which guns from the Gosport Navy Yard, are mounted. Company officers have no commissions."
R. A. Hardaway,
Captain, Artillery, Alabama Volunteers

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 1, Serial No.13: Record of events for Hurt's Battery, Alabama Artillery, June 1862-February 1865, edited by James B Hewett

"A few days after, his company was ordered to Lynchburg, and he retraced his steps to Virginia along with his comrades. In June, 'The Rifles' were regularly mustered into service, with A. S. Van de Graff as their captain, and not long after, were ordered to Sterrett's Battery at Manassas. Here the company remained until after the battle of July 21st, when it was stationed at Cock Pit Point. Subsequently it was organised with four other companies from Alabama into the 5th Alabama Battalion, and placed under the command of Captain B. W. Frobel."

The University memorial: Biographical sketches of alumni of the University of Virginia who fell in the Confederate War, five Volumes in one, by Rev John Lipscomb Johnson, B A

"He had the honor of holding a lieutenant's commission in the first company accepted by the Confederate government, Hardway's battery, which he joined early in the spring of 1861, and immediately thereafter departed for the seat of war in Virginia, where he received his first baptism of fire in the bloody battle of Bull Run." John W Tullis

Memorial Record of Alabama: A concise account of the State's political, military, professional and industrial progress, together with the personal memoirs of many of its people, Volume 1, by Brant & Fuller

"I have been temporarily assigned to a detachment of Alabama, Louisiana and Georgia troops, amounting to about a regiment of men."

"II. The following companies of Volunteers have been selected for duty as artillerists in the Batteries of the entrenched camp at this place, and will be reported at once to Col S Jones, Chief of Artillery, to be assigned to service and placed in accordance with paragraphs V & VI Special orders, No.92 from these Hd Qrs of yesterday – namely – Capt R A Hardaway's Company Alabama Volunteers; Capt A S Van de Graaf's Company, North Sumter Alabama Volunteers; and Capt G V Moody's Company of Louisiana Volunteers."

"You can not appreciate the great physical and mental labor of watching a battle in full view for eight hours."

A Life in Letters: Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Hardaway in the Civil War and the New South, 28 April to 6 August, 1861

"After making thorough and careful inquiries from persons living at this place, I learn that only about eighteen pieces of heavy artillery were at any one time in position at Manassas Junction, which, when added to the eight in the large fort at Centreville, makes twenty-six."

A History of the United States Secret Service, by L C Baker

"Met with an old schoolmate toady. Wm Fulton of Sumter Co. Ala. a member of Capt Vandegraf's company stationed at Manassas."

Voices from Company D: Diaries by the Greensboro Guards, Fifth Alabama Infantry Regiment, Army of Northern Virginia, by G Ward Hubbs

"With Beauregard's army were several companies of Pickens' heavy artillery, numbering 293 officers and men, who were also not engaged."

The long arm of Lee or the history of the artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia with a brief account of the Confederate Bureau of Ordnance, Volume I, by Jennings C Wise

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 1, Serial No.13: Record of events for Fifth Battalion, Alabama Infantry, (Van de Graaff's Battalion; also called Eighth/Fifth Battalion and Archer's Brigade; served as Provost Guard, Third Alabama Cavalry), April 1861-February 1865, edited by James B Hewett

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 23, Serial No.35: Record of events for Moody's Madison Light Artillery, June 1861-February 1865, edited by James B Hewett

The Confederate Veteran, Volume 11: John W. Bennett, p332

Confederate military history extended edition: A library of Confederate States history, in seventeen volumes, written by distinguished men of the South, edited by General Clement A Evans of Georgia

Heroes and martyrs of Georgia: Georgia's record in the revolution of 1861, Volume 1, by James M Folsom

For home and honour: The story of Madison County, Virginia, during the War between the States 1861-1865, by Harold R Woodward, Jr.

Notes

The Battalion Heavy Artillery was organised at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Lieutenat Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, Army of the Potomac, by Special Orders No. 92, Paragraph VI, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Evacuation of Alexandria to Back Lick Run, in the vicinity of Springfield, Fairfax County, Virginia, 5-6 May, 1861: The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery evacuated Alexandria, Virginia, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel A S Taylor, Provisional Army of Virginia, at 11 PM on 5 May, 1861, and was accompanied by the Emmett Guards, the Old Dominion Rifles, the Mount Vernon Guards, the Alexandria Riflemen, and the Warren Rifles. The company arrived at Camp Taylor, on Back Lick Run, in the vicinity of Springfield, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 6 AM on 6 May, 1861.

Note: T Triplett was appointed captain, Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery, on 25 April, 1861, dated 23 April, 1861, and the Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, between 6 and 7 May, 1861.

Detachment of Alabama, Louisiana, & Georgia Volunteers, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, 3 July, 1861: The Mobile Pulaski Rifles, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, the North Sumter Rifles, the Madison Tipperarys, the Daniel Boone Rifles, and the Crescent Blues, Company B, were stationed at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, under the temporary command of Captain R A Hardaway, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, on 3 July, 1861.

Note: Captain R A Hardaway, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, was temporarily assigned to command a detachment of eight independent Alabama, Louisiana, and Georgia Companies at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, on 28 June, 1861, and First Lieutenant W B Hurt, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, was appointed first lieutenant and adjutant, detachment of Alabama, Louisiana, and Georgia Volunteers, between 28 June, and 5 July, 1861. First Lieutenant & Adjutant W B Hurt, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, was appointed first lieutenant and adjutant, Battaluon Heavy Artillery, between 6 July, 1861, and 8 March, 1862.

Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, North Sumter Rifles & Madison Tipperarys, 4-5 July, 1861: Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, the North Sumter Rifles, and the Madison Tipperarys were ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Captain R A Hardaway, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, on 4 July, 1861, and were accompanied by the Crescent Blues, Company B (See Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry). Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, the North Sumter Rifles, and the Madison Tipperarys arrived at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Special Orders No.92, Paragraph VI, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery, 5 July, 1861: The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Virginia, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, Army of the Potomac, by Special Orders No.92, Paragraph VI, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Special Orders No.94, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, North Sumter Rifles & Madison Tipperarys, 6 July, 1861: Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, the North Sumter Rifles, and the Madison Tipperarys were assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, Army of the Potomac, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861.

Note: The Crescent Blues, Company B, under the command of Captain McG C Goodwyn, was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry at the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, by Special Orders No.94, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861 (See Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry).

Special Orders No.111, Paragraph VII, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, Greene Rough & Readys, 13 July, 1861: The Greene Rough and Readys was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, Army of the Potomac, by Special Orders No.111, Paragraph VII, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861.

Special Orders No.122, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 155th Virginia Militia Infantry (Greene County), 16 July, 1861: Captain J G E Davis' Company, 155th Virginia Militia Infantry (Greene County), arrived at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 14 July, 1861, and was assigned to the Battalion Heavy Artillery within entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery and ordnance, by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861 (See the Virginia Militia Battalion Infantry).

Note: The Madison Artillery or Tips was temporarily assigned to the 49th Virginia Infantry by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861.

Special Orders No.111, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 21 July, 1861: The Battalion Heavy Artillery was assigned to Batteries A, C, D, G, N, P, I, R, and S, within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Captain I S Sterrett, Confederate States Navy, by Special Orders No.111, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861 (See the Entrenched Naval Batteries).

Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery

The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery was stationed at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, under the command of Major C Boyle, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 8 May, 1861.

Mustered one year, Alexandria, Virginia, 25 April, 1861: The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery was mustered in state service for one year by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, at Alexandria, Virginia, on 25 April, 1861

Organisation of Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery, Alexandria, Virginia, 25 April, 1861: Captain T Triplett, First Lieutenant W McGrane, Second Lieutenant C C Semmes

The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery was designated Whittington's Light Artillery, under the command of Captain G T Whittington, on 1 April, 1862, and was assigned to the 19th Virginia Battalion Heavy Artillery, Company E (3rd), under the command of Lieutenant Colonel J W Atkinson, by Special Orders No.186, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 12 December, 1862.

Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, 9 April, 1865: The 19th Virginia Battalion Heavy Artillery, Company E (3rd), surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry

Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry was stationed at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, on 21 June, 1861.

Organisation of Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, Hatchechubbee, Russell County, Alabama, 1 June, 1861: Captain R A Hardaway, First Lieutenant W B Hurt, Second Lieutenant J W Tullis

Mustered in for war, Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, 21 June, 1861: Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 21 June, 1861.

Note: The Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry was stationed within the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, between 5 July, 1861, and 8 March, 1862.

Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Rapidan Station, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, Culpeper & Orange Counties, Virginia, 8 March-1 April, 1862: Hardaway's Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry was ordered to Rapidan Station, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, Culpeper, and Orange Counties, Virginia, on 8 March, 1862, and was designated Hardaway's Alabama Light Artillery on 31 March, 1862.

Note: Captain R A Hardaway, Hardaway's Alabama Light Artillery, was appointed major, Confederate States Army, on 2 December, 1862, and First Lieutenant W B Hurt, Hardaway's Alabama Light Artillery, was appointed captain, Hurt's Alabama Light Artillery, on 1 April, 1863, dated 3 January, 1863.

Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, 9 April, 1865: The Hurt's Alabama Light Artillery, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel W M Owens, surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

North Sumter Rifles

The North Sumter Rifles was stationed at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, on 23 June, 1861.

Organisation of North Sumter Rifles, Gainesville, Sumter County, Alabama, 26 May, 1861: Captain A S Van de Graaf, First Lieutenant J M Winston, Second Lieutenant W Ritter

Mustered in war, Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, 23 June, 1861: The North Sumter Rifles was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 23 June, 1861.

Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Manassas Junction, to Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, 17-20 January, 1861: The North Sumter Rifles was ordered to Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, on 17 January, 1862, and arrived on 20 January, 1862.

Note: The North Sumter Rifles was assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel F B Shepherd, at Cockpit Point, Prince William County, Virginia, on 24 January, 1862.

5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, 2 December, 1861: The North Sumter Rifles was assigned to the 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, Company A, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel F B Shepherd, at Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, on 2 December, 1861.

Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, 9 April, 1865: The 5th Alabama Battalion Infantry, under the command of Captain W Ritter, surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

Madison Tipperarys

The Madison Tipperarys was stationed at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, on 23 June, 1861.

Organisation of Madison Tipperarys, New Carthage, Madison Parish, Louisiana, 23 May, 1861: Captain G V Moody, First Lieutenant G F Abbay, Second Lieutenant O P Watson

Mustered in for war, Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, 23 June, 1861: The Madison Tipperarys was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, by Major & Assistant Adjutant General H L Clay, Confederate States Army, on 23 June, 1861.

Designated Madison Light Artillery, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 23 August, 1861: The Madison Tipperarys was designated the Madison Light Artillery by order of the Secretary of War L P Walker on 23 August, 1861.

Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, 9 April, 1865: The Madison Light Artillery surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, chief of artillery & ordnance, Army of the Potomac, Battalion Heavy Artillery, 5 July, 1861: Captain S Jones, 1st United States Artillery, Company F, resigned at Washington, D. C., on 22 April, 1861, dated 27 April, 1861, and was appointed lieutenant colonel, artillery, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 8 May, 1861. Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, artillery, Provisional Army of Virginia, was appointed major, artillery, Confederate States Army, on 20 May, 1861, dated 16 March, 1861, and was assigned to command the Battalion Heavy Artillery at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.92, Paragraph VI, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861. Major S Jones, artillery, Confederate States Army, was appointed colonel, artillery, Confederate States Army, at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861, and brigadier general, Confederate States Army, on 28 August, 1861, dated 21 July, 1861.

Note: S Jones was appointed acting assistant adjutant general to Brigadier General P St G Cocke, Provisional Army of Virginia, and ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Alexandria, Virginia, by Special Orders No.1, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 26 April, 1861, and was stationed at Camp Jefferson, on the grounds of the University of Virginia, one mile west of Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 19 May, 1861 (See the Garrison at Alexandria).

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT No.84, Part I: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), pp484-504
Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, Army of the Potomac, and resulting correspondence, Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 14 October, 1861, dated Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 26 August, 1861