The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Camp Pickens, Army of the potomac

The 4th South Carolina Infantry working in the trenches at night at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Virginia

The 4th South Carolina Infantry working in the trenches during night at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia

Garrison at Camp Pickens

Stationed within the entrenchments at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 21 July 1861

COLONEL G H TERRETT, Provisional Army of Virginia
Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia; the 7th Louisiana Infantry, the 7th Louisiana Infantry, the unattached companies of infantry, and the Battalion Heavy Artillery by Special Orders No. 92, Pragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Eighth Louisiana Infantry

Maj. J B Prados

Company A Creole Guards: CAPT. J L FREMAUX
Company B Bienville Rifles: CAPT. A LAROSE
Company C Attakapas Guards: CAPT. A DEBLANC
Company H Cheneyville Rifles: CAPT. P F KEARY

The 8th Louisiana Infantry was ordered to proceed by New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 22 and 23 June, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, via Lynchburg; Charlottesville, Albemarle County; and Gordonsville, Orange County, Virginia, on 30 June and 1 July, 1861. The 8th Louisiana Infantry was assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.81, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 1 July, 1861, and Companies A, B, C, and H, under the command of Major J B Prados, were stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the morning on 21 July, 1861 (See the 8th Louisiana Infantry).

Forty-Ninth Virginia Infantry

Company A Flint Hill Rifles: CAPT. W J Williams
The 49th Virginia Infantry, Company A, was assigned to the 49th Virginia Infantry by Special Orders No.124, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, at Flint Hill, Rappahannock County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the afternoon on 21 July, 1861 (See the 49th Virginia Infantry).
Company F Ewell Guards: CAPT. J B Norvell
The 49th Virginia Infantry, Company F, was assigned to the 49th Virginia Infantry by Special Orders No.124, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, at Brentsville Courthouse, Prince William County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 19 July, 1861 (See the 49th Virginia Infantry).

Thirteenth Virginia Infantry

Lieut. Col. J A Walker

Company A Montpelier Guard: CAPT. B F Nalle
Company B (1st) Culpeper Minutemen: CAPT. C T CRITTENDEN
Company C Gordonsville Greys: CAPT. W C SCOTT
Company D Louisa Blues: CAPT. H W MURRAY

The 13th Virginia Infantry, Companies A, B (1st), C, and D, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel J A Walker, were assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the afternoon on 21 July, 1861 (See the 13th Virginia Infantry).

Unattached

Madison Artillery or Tips: CAPT. G V Moody
The Madison Artillery or Tips was temporarily assigned to the 49th Virginia Infantry by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861 (See the Battalion Heavy Artillery).

Virginia Militia Battalion Infantry

The Virginia Militia of Culpeper, Fairfax, Fauquier, Greene, Loudoun, Madison, Orange, Prince William, and Rappahannock Counties were ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by General Orders No.40, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 13 July, 1861, and detachments were stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the morning on 21 July, 1861 (See the Virginia Militia Battalion Infantry).

Garrison Duty, 25-28 July, 1861

First Mississippi Battalion Infantry Twenty-first Mississippi Infantry): Lieut. Col. W L Brandon
The 1st Mississippi Battalion Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel W L Brandon, was assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.165, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 25 July, 1861 (See the 21st Mississippi Infantry).
Third Georgia Battalion Infantry (Twentieth Georgia Infantry): Lieut. Col. W D Smith
The 3rd Georgia Battalion Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel W D Smith, was assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.165, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 25 July, 1861 (See the 20th Georgia Infantry).
Forty-ninth Virginia Infantry: Col. W Smith
The 49th Virginia Infantry was temporarily assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.179, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 28 July, 1861 (See the 49th Virginia Infantry).

Fourth North Carloina State Troops

The 4th North Carolina State Troops was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Hill, near Garysburg, Northampton County, North Carolina, on 2 July, 1861, and Companies A, C, F, G, and K, under the command of Colonel G B Anderson, were ordered to proceed by the Weldon Railroad to Richmond, Virginia, on 20 July, 1861. The 4th North Carolina State Troops, Companies A, C, F, G, and K, were accompanied by the Rowan Artillery, 10th North Carolina State Troops, Company D, and arrived by the Richmond & Petersburg Railroad at at Camp Fisher, Griffin's Spring, in the vicinity of Rocketts, near Richmond, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861.

Organisation of 4th North Carolina State Troops, 2 July, 1861: Colonel G B Anderson, Lieutenant Colonel J A Young, Major B Grimes; Company A, Captain A R Simonton; Company B, Captain J H Wood; Company C, Captain J B Andrews; Company D, Captain J B Whittaker; Company E, Captain D M Carter; Company F, Captain J S Barnes; Company G, Captain W G Kelly; Company H, Captain E A Osborne; Company I, Captain W T Marsh; Company K, Captain F Y McNeely

Richmond to Manassas Junction, Virginia, Companies A, C, F, G, & K, 25-27 July, 1861: The 4th North Carolina State Troops, Companies A, C, F, G, and K, and the Rowan Artillery, 10th North Carolina State Troops, Company D, were ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.232, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 25 July, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 27 July, 1861.

Note: The 4th North Carolina State Troops, Companies B, D, E, H, and I, were ordered to proceed by the Weldon Railroad to Richmond, Virginia, on 28 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Fisher, Griffin's Spring, in the vicinity of Rocketts, near Richmond, Virginia, on 29 July, 1861. Companies B, D, E, H, and I were ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 8 August, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 9 August, 1861.

Rowan Artillery, Tenth North Carloina State Troops, Company D (First North Carolina Artillery, Light Company D)

The Rowan Artillery, 10th North Carolina State Troops, Company D, under the command of Captain J Reilly, was mustered in Confederate service for the war at Camp Hill, near Garysburg, Northampton County, North Carolina, on 16 July, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Weldon Railroad to Richmond, Virginia, under the command of Colonel G B Anderson, were The 4th North Carolina State Troops, on 20 July, 1861. The company was accompanied by the 4th North Carolina State Troops, Companies A, C, F, G, and K, and arrived by the Richmond & Petersburg Railroad at at Camp Fisher, Griffin's Spring, in the vicinity of Rocketts, near Richmond, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861.

Note: The Rowan Artillery, 10th North Carolina State Troops, Company D, was temporarily assigned to at Camp Hill, near Garysburg, Northampton County, North Carolina, on 20 July, 1861.

Organisation of Rowan Artillery, 10th North Carolina State Troops, Company D, 16 July, 1861: Captain J Reilly, Fisrt Lieutenants J A Ramsay & W W Myers, Second Lieutenants J T Woodward & W L Saunders

Richmond to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 25-27 July, 1861: The Rowan Artillery, 10th North Carolina State Troops, Company D, and the 4th North Carolina State Troops, Companies A, C, F, G, and K, were ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.232, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 25 July, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 27 July, 1861.

Sources

"From Geo. T. Whitington, Alexandria - First morning report of troops at Manassas Junction, under command of Major Cornelius Boyle, 6th May, 1861."

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2, p.160

"We learn from a friend that the Irish Volunteers and Emmet Guards, stationed at Manassas Station, are in good spirits, and are having a good time generally."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 13 May, 1861 - War movements

"Among the troops yet at the Junction is the entire regiment of Col. Garland, made up almost entirely of companies from this city and country."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 28 June, 1861 - From Manassas Junction

"Colonel Terrett was placed in command of a newly formed Fourth Brigade composed of Moore's, Garland's and Corse's regiments of Virginia volunteers (the 1st, 11th and 17th Regiments) on June 20, 1861, but the arrival of a newly commissioned Confederate brigadier, James Longstreet, brought about Terret's replacement. He commanded the troops at Camp Pickens, Manassas, including a naval battery under Capt. Isaac S. Sterrett, CSN, from about July 10 to August 22, 1861, when he resigned his Virginia commission."

Biographical sketches of the commissioned officers of the Confederate States Marine Corps, edited by David M Sullivan

"General G T Beauregard arrived at Manassas on the 1st day of June, and was placed in command of the army; the month passed in making the position as impregnable as possible. The work, in charge of Colonel Williamson, his chief of engineers, progressed rapidly; large earthworks and field fortifications, with wings and cover of rifle pits, and infantry works, sprang up on all sides. Details from different regiments in camp were daily employed in digging and ditching."

History of the Seventeenth Virginia infantry, C.S.A., by George Wise

"The works, armed with naval guns, were manned by the seamen already alluded to, and also by a force of State militia, which Governor Letcher had called out, at General Beauregard’s request."

"Some slight field-works constructed for the defense of the depot at Manassas Junction were armed with fourteen or fifteen old twenty-four-pounders on naval carriages, and occupied by two thousand men. The heavy artillery was under the command of naval officers."

Narrative of military operations directed, during the late War Between the states, by Joseph E Johnston

"At one time, when reports of evil omen and disaster reached Camp Pickens with such circumstantiality as to give reasonable grounds of anxiety, its commander, Colonel Terrett, the commander of the intrenched batteries, Captain Sterrett, of the C S Navy, and their officers, made the most efficient possible preparations for the desperate defense of that position in extremity; and in this connection I regret my inability to mention the names of those patriotic gentlemen of Virginia by the gratuitous labor of whose slaves the intrenched camp at Manassas had been mainly constructed, relieving the troops from that laborious service, and giving opportunity for their military instruction. Lieut. Col. Thomas H Williamson, the engineer of these works, assisted by Capt. D B Harris, discharged his duties with untiring energy and devotion as well as satisfactory skill."

"With Beauregard's army were several companies of Pickens' heavy artillery, numbering 293 officers and men, who were also not engaged."

The long arm of Lee or the history of the artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia with a brief account of the Confederate Bureau of Ordnance, Volume I, by Jennings C Wise

"Land-locked Manassas seemed an unlikely place to find a naval battery, but in July 1861, cannon captured at the Norfolk Navy Yard stood ready to defend Manassas Junction."

Images of America, Manassas: A place of passage, by Kathleen Mulvaney

"Appreciating such a feeling in men of their position, new to arduous duties of that kind, and wishing to avoid whatever might at that moment cause disffection, general Beauregard abstained from employing them on any but the most essential works, and procured, as far as possible, negro labor, which was furnished at his call, by the comparatively small number of slave-owners of the Piedmont region of Virginia, with great readiness."

"On the 18th, having begun to receive from Norfolk the naval guns for which he had called, to arm the works at Manassas, General Beauregard made a requisition for naval officers to command those batteries and drill the recruits. They came with a number of sailors, bringing their gun-ropes, blocks, and tackles, and their exercises the terms 'port' and 'starboard,' novel in the field, were used as familiarly as on board a man-of-war."

The military operations of General Beauregard in the War Between the States, 1861 to 1865, including a brief personal sketch and a narrative of his services in the war with Mexico, 1846-8, Volume 1, by Alfred Roman

"Beauregard was busy fortifying, and concentrated his attention on Manassas itself rather than on the line of Bull Run. With the help of slave labour supplied by the neigbouring planters, he erected several considerable earthworks in front of the junction; later he place these under the command of Colonel Terrett, who was given about a thousand local militia to man the works, and some naval officers to see to the serving of the guns."

Bull Run: Its strategy and tactics, by R M Johnston

"A seccession of broken, wooded hills around the plateau, composed strong natural fortifications; and Beauregard’s engineers had cast up formidable artificial ones there. Among these, the most noted was the Naval Battery, composed of the heaviest Dahlgren guns, which the insurgents seized at the Gosport Navy Yard, and manned by seamen, commanded by officers of the National Navy who abanadoned their flag."

Pictorial history of the Civil War in the United States of America, Volume 1, by Benson John Lossing

"For several days I was unwell, and could not attend to duty, but being allowed to walk abour as leisure, I frequently strolled down to the Junction, to watch the progress of our preparations. A large redoubt about half a mile long, and a quarter wide, had been erected since my previous visit; it was at least ten feet high, and as many wide on the top, with a large ditch in front. The batteries at the angles were semicircular, with embrasures for four thirty-two-pounders, the mouths of which looked like black bull-dogs, protecting the road. In the interior were other works of greater or less magnitude, connected by covered ways, all well provided with ammunition and bomb-proof magazines. There were several smaller batteries placed in front on elavations, and the works altogether seemed formidable enough to protect the dépôt and stores, should the enemy penetrate so far."

Battlefields of the South, from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh, with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps, by an English combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery on the Field Staff, with two maps

"The Confederate force was distributed along Bull Run from Union Mills to the Stone Bridge (nearly eight miles), with reserves and a fortified position at or near the Junction."

The C.S.A., and the battle of Bull Run: A letter to an English friend, by J G Barnard

Confederate military history extended edition: A library of Confederate States history, in seventeen volumes, written by distinguished men of the South, edited by General Clement A Evans of Georgia

Heroes and martyrs of Georgia: Georgia's record in the Revolution of 1861, Volume 1, by James M Folsom

For home and honour: The story of Madison County, Virginia, during the War Between the States 1861-1865, by Harold R Woodward, Jr.

Notes

Brigadier General P St G Cocke, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command the Department of Alexandria, at Alexandria, Virginia, on 14 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 7 AM on 28 April, 1861.

Major C Boyle, Provisional Army of Virginia, 29 April-12 May, 1861: Captain C Boyle, Washington Volunteers, Company A, was appointed major, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 27 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.10, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 29 April, 1861 (See the Garrison at Alexandria). Major C Boyle, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, between 29 and 12 May, 1861.

Beauregard Rifles, 1 May, 1861: The Beauregard Rifles was mustered in state service at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 1 May, 1861 (See Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry).

Note: Colonel P St G Cocke, Confederate States Army, was ordered to stationed troops at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 May, 1861.

Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery & Emmett Guards, 8 May, 1861: The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery and the Emmett Guards were stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 8 May, 1861 (See the Battalion Heavy Artillery).

Note: The Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery and the Emmett Guards were ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, between 6 and 7 May, 1861.

Powhatan Troop, Rappahannock Cavalry, Black Horse Troop, & a section of Alexandria Artillery, 8 & 9 May, 1861: The Powhatan Troop was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the morning on 8 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the evening on 9 May, 1861. The Rappahannock Cavalry, the Black Horse Troop, and a section of the Alexandria Artillery accompanied by Colonel P St G Cocke, Confederate States Army, were ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the morning on 9 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, the same day.

Note: The Powhatan Troop and the Alexandria Artillery were stationed at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia; the Rappahannock Cavalry at Amissville, Rappahannock, Virginia, and the Black Horse Troop at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, on 8 May, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, assistant adjutant general, Provisional Army of Virginia, 8 May, 1861: Lieutenant Colonel S Jones, assistant adjutant general, Provisional Army of Virginia, was stationed at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia on 7 May, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 8 May, 1861.

Richmond to Manassas Junction, Virginia, Lynchburg Rifle Greys, Lynchburg Home Guard, Southern Guards, & Fincastle Rifles, 12-14 May, 1861: The Lynchburg Rifle Greys, the Lynchburg Home Guard, the Southern Guards, and the Fincastle Rifles, under the command Major S Garland, Jr., Confederate States Army, were ordered to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.32, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 9 May, 1861, and proceeded by the Virginia Central Railroad on 10 May, 1861 (See the 11th Virginia Infantry). The Lynchburg Rifle Greys, the Lynchburg Home Guard, the Southern Guards, and the Fincastle Rifles, arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, via Gordonsville, Orange County, and Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 12 May, 1861.

Troops stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, Major S Garland, Jr., 14 May, 1861: Prince William Rifles, Emmett Guards, Irish Volunteers or Triplett's Heavy Artillery, Lynchburg Rifle Greys, Lynchburg Home Guard, Southern Guards, Fincastle Rifles, Black Horse Troop, Rappahannock Cavalry, two 6 pounder smoothbores of the Alexandria Artillery

Note: Major S Garland, Jr., Confederate States Army, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, between 12 and 22 May, 1861.

Richmond to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 1st South Carolina Infantry, 23-24 May, 1861: Brigadier General M L Bonham, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the Department of Alexandria at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.95, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 21 May, 1861, and proceeded by the Virginia Central Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 23 May, 1861. He was accompanied by the 1st South Carolina Infantry and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction via Gordonsville, Orange County, and Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, on 24 May, 1861 (See the 1st South Carolina Infantry).

Brigadier General M L Bonham, Confederate States Army, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 21-31 May, 1861: Brigadier General M L Bonham, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, between 21 and 31 May, 1861.

Evacuation of Alexandria, Virginia, 24 May, 1861: The 6th Virginia Battalion Volunteers, the Warren Rifles, the Loudoun Guards, and the Fairfax Cavalry or Washington Mounted Guards, evacuated Alexandria, Virginia, under the command of Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, in the morning on 24 May, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Virginia, at 11 AM the same day (See the Garrison at Alexandria).

Richmond to Manassas Junction, Virginia, Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, 1 June, 1861: Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the Department of Alexandria at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.149, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 31 May, 1861, and proceeded by the Virginia Central Railroad to Manasas Junction, Virginia, in the morning on 1 June, 1861. Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, via Gordonsville, Orange County, and Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 2 PM the same day.

Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, 31 May, 1861: Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 31 May, 1861.

Note: Brigdaier General M L Bonham, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the troops stationed at Fairfax County, Virginia, including the 2nd South Carolina Infantry and Colonel G H Terrett the troops stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No. 1, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 4 June, 1861.

7th Louisiana Infantry & 8th Louisiana Infantry, 1 July, 1861: The 7th Louisiana Infantry and the 8th Louisiana Infantry were assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.81, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 1 July, 1861.

Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, 5 July, 1861: Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia; the 7th Louisiana Infantry, the 8th Louisiana Infantry, the unattached companies of infantry, and the Battalion Heavy Artillery by Special Orders No. 92, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Acting Provost Marshall & Major C Boyle, 16 July, 1861: Acting Provost Marshall & Major C Boyle, Provisional Army of Virginia, was appointed provost marshall at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No. 118, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 16 July, 1861.

Note: Major C Boyle, Provisional Army of Virginia, was stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, as acting provost marshall on 10 July, 1861.

1st Mississippi Battalion Infantry & 3rd Georgia Battalion Infantry, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 26 July, 1861: The 1st Mississippi Battalion Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel W L Brandon, and the 3rd Georgia Battalion Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel W D Smith, were assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.165, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 26 July, 1861 (See the 21st Mississippi Infantry).

49th Virginia Infantry, 28 July, 1861: The 49th Virginia Infantry was temporarily assigned to garrison duty at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.179, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 28 July, 1861.

Colonel H B Kelly, 8th Louisiana Infantry, 1 August, 1861: Colonel H B Kelly, 8th Louisiana Infantry, was assigned to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No. 191, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 1 August, 1861.

Note: Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, was granted a leave of absence for a week by Special Orders No. 191, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 1 August, 1861, and his resignation was accepted by Special Orders No.138, Paragraph IV, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 30 August, 1861.

Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia: Brevet Major & Captain G H Terrett, United States Marine Corps, resigned on 22 April, 1861, and arrived at Richmond, Virginia, on 25 April, 1861. He was appointed colonel, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 27 April, 1861, and assigned to command Alexandria, Virginia, and the troops from Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Fauquier counties on 10 May, 1861. Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, evacuated Alexandria, Virginia, in the morning on 24 May, 1861, and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, at 11 AM the same day. He was assigned to command the Fourth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No. 20, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861, and to command Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.92, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861 (See the Fourth Brigade, Army of the Potomac). Colonel G H Terrett was appointed major, Confederate States Marine Corps, on 22 August, 1861.

Note: Colonel G H Terrett, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command the troops from the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Fauquier by Special Orders No.39, Paragraph I, Headquarters of the Division, Richmond, Virginia, on 10 May, 1861.

Note: A detachment of forty men of the United States Marine Corps, under the command of Brevet Major & Captain G H Terrett, were ordered to proceed by the steamer Philadelphia to Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Mayland, in the afternoon on 5 January, 1861, and were assigned to garrison duty between 5 and 26 January, 1861. Captain A S Taylor, United States Marine Corps, was assigned to command Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Mayland, between 9 and 26 January, 1861, and Brevet Major & Captain G H Terrett was ordered to the Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C., on 9 January, 1861 (See the United States Marine Corps Battalion).

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT No.84, Part I: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), pp484-504
Brigadier General P G T Beauregard, Confederate States Army, Army of the Potomac, and resulting correspondence, Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 14 October, 1861, dated Manassas Junction, Virginia, 26 August, 1861