The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Second Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah

Captain C J Desha, commanding Company B, 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters

Captain C J Desha, 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company B

Second Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters

Mustered in Confederate service for one year 9 and 11 May, 1861, dated 23 April, 1861. Arrived at Manassas Junction, Virginia, under the command of Major T Claiborne, 21 July, 1861. Not present at the first battle of Manassas

ACTING MAJOR & CAPTAIN J D POPE
Acting Major & Captain J D Pope, 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, resigned at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861, and was accepted by Special Orders No.133, Paragraph I, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 24 August, 1861.

Company A Bustard Guards: First LT. P M Victor
The company was accepted in Confederate service at Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, under the command of Captain J D Pope, on 23 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad to Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, the same day. The company was mustered in Confederate service for one year at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, by Captain G W Carr, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 9 May, 1861, dated 23 April, 1861, and First Lieutenant P M Victor, 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company A, resigned at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861. His resignation was accepted by Special Orders No.133, Paragraph I, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 24 August, 1861, and Second Lieutenant W H Rowan, 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry, was appointed captain on 21 July, 1861. The company was assigned to the 1st Kentucky Infantry, Company D, on 15 August, 1861 (See the 1st Kentucky Infantry).
Company B Desha's Independent Company: CAPT. J DESHA
The company was stationed at Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky, on 21 April, 1861, and was ordered to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, on 22 April, 1861. The company arrived at Louisville, Jefferson County, via Paris, Bourbon County, and Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky, the same day and was accepted in Confederate service for one year on 23 April, 1861. The company was ordered to proceed by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad to Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, the same day and was mustered in Confederate service for one year at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, by Captain G W Carr, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 11 May, 1861, dated 23 April, 1861. The company was assigned to the 1st Kentucky Infantry, Company C, on 15 August, 1861 (See the 1st Kentucky Infantry).

Sources

"The companies of Capts. Desha and Pope have been temporarily organized into a separate battalion. Capt. Pope acts as major, and Lieut. W. S. Rogers, of Harrison County, as Adjutant."

The Louisville Daily Courier, 25 May, 1861 - From Harper Ferry

"Two companies, averaging one hundred and fourteen men each, were recruited in Louisville, at the corner of Fifth and Jefferson streets, at once upon the outbreak of the war, under command of Captains B. M. Anderson and F. Van Osten. On the 20th of April, 1861, they left by steamer from the foot of Fourth street, with a Secession flag flying, for New Orleans. At Owensboro a third company, commanded by Captain J Thompson, was embarked on the same vessel. From New Orleans the companies were ordered to Richmond, and were there organised as the Third Kentucky Battalion, with Anderson as major."

"Only three days after the departure of the first Louisville companies, two more, averaging one hundred apiece, raised in the city, under the auspices of Blanton Duncan, and one of whose commanders Captain Lapaille, departed on the Louisville and Nashville railroad, under orders for Lynchburg, Virginia. At Nashville it was joined by a company from the southwest part of Kentucky, headed by Captain, afterward Colonel E. Crossland, and another from Callaway county, led by Captain Brownson. From Lynchburg these companies were ordered to Harper’s Ferry, where they formed another Kentucky Battalion, with Duncan Major."

"On the same day, 23 April, and on the same train, went another Louisville company, commanded by Capatin J. D. Pope, and numbering 114 men, and one from Scott county, mustering 122, and under Captain Desha, son of ex-Governor Desha, of this State. They reached Harper’s Ferry in due time, and were organised as rifle companies, forming the Second Battalion of Kentucky Sharpshooters, under Pope now promoted to major, and were assigned to the brigade of Bartow, who was killed in the first battle of Manasass."

"An independent Confederate company was also raised in Louisville by Capatin L. H. Fitzhugh; and upon its arrival in Virginia, and after the battle just named, the several majors of the Kentucky battalions petitioned the war Department at Richmond for consolidation of their commands into a regiment. The request was granted and the regiment formed accordingly, with all the Louisville companies aforesaid in it, and T. H. Taylor, now chief of police in that city, as colonel, W. P. Johnson, lieutenant colonel and E. crossland, major, all the majors of battalions having mutually agreed to retire from the contest for position as field officers. The former majors returned to the line as captains."

History of the Ohio falls cities and their counties with illustrations and bibliographical sketches, Volume 1, extract: Louisville men in the Southern army, from a statement by Colonel John D Pope, of the Attorney's bureau in the Louisville and Nashville railway offices

"Capt. Jack Thompson left Owensboro, Kentucky, on Tuesday with eighty-five men for service in Virginia." 31 May, 1861

"Early in the spring of 1861, he raised a large company for the Confederate infantry, and went out under the temporary command of Colonel Blanton Duncan, but, shortly after the operations at Harpers Ferry, it was mustered into service as an independent company. In July, 1861, he joined the Kentucky Battalion under Lieutenant-Colonel Claiborne. This became, in a few weeks, the First Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, in which his company was incorporated, under the title of "C."

History of the First Kentucky Brigade, by Edwin Porter Thompson

"Headquarters Camp Duncan, Lynchburg, Va: At noon today we were ordered from camp to report for immediate march to Richmond. Although weary and worn down from the protracted railroad trip, every man in the command appeared fresh and full of life on duty. Our Captain, Jo Desha, while was hindered from getting upon the train. The tribute paid to him when he arrived was worth a dozen victories. Then came grand order for Harper's Ferry." 10 May, 1861

"Members of the Kentucky Battalion at Harper's Ferry, Capt. Pope's company had become very troublesome to the command, and Col. Duncan refused to permit them to be mustered into his battalion." 16 May, 1861

"We learn that Capt. John D. Pope, of the Bustard Guards, had been promoted to the position of Major of Battalion, and Lieut. Phil Victor is now in command of the company." 21 May, 1861

"Capt. Jack Thompson left Owensboro, Kentucky, on Tuesday with eighty-five men for service in Virginia." 31 May, 1861

"Col. Blanton Duncan yesterday resigned his command of the First Kentucky Battalion. The causes leading to this action are wholly of a private and personal charcater. The companies of Capts. Desha and Pope will unite with other Kentuckians, and thus render the battalion the most effective in the service. Col. Duncan leaves tomorrow for Richmond, and will probably return very soon to Louisville. The Harvey Rifles is the name that is now read of all men from the banner of the company of Capt. James B. Harvey. Duncan has been omitted by a vote of the privates." 29 July, 1861

"Col. Thomas H. Taylor, of Frankfort, Ky., has been appointed Colonel of (Blanton) Duncan's Kentucky Regiment. The regiment is at Manassas, Va. The colonel will be remembered as a bearer of dispatches from Jeff Davis to Washington." 29 August, 1861

Kentucky soldiers and their regiments in the Civil War: Abstracted from the pages of contemporary Kentucky newspapers, Volumes 4 & 5, by Steven L Wright

"A regiment of troops, from Ky., under Col. Blanton Duncan, now at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in the Confederate Army." 15 May, 1861

History of Kentucky, Volume 1, by Lewis Collins and Richard H Collins

"On 25 April, 1861, Captain Joe Desha and one hundred men from Harrison County, along with three companies from Louisville under Captains John Pope, J. B. Harvey and Michael Lapielle, left the state to join the Confederate Army. They were joined at Nashville by two companies from Southwest Kentucky."

Louisville and the Civil War: A history and guide, by Bryan S Bush

"They are under the command of Col. Blanton Duncan, and the following officers: Adjutant D. J. Symmes; Surgeon, Dr. Alex. Forsythe; and Captains Jo. Desha, of Harrison county; Ed. Crossland, of Hickman county; John D. Pope, of Louisville; M. Lapielle, of Louisville, and Harvey, of Louisville. They are all dressed in the blue Kentucky hunting shirt, and a finer body of men the world has never produced. On Thursday night they left Lynchburg for Harper's Ferry."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 4 May, 1861 - The Kentucky troops

"They number about six hundred, are uniformed in blue woolen hunting shirts and trousers, with slouched hats, and are commanded by Col. Blanton Duncan, a wealthy gentleman of Kentucky, who served in the regiment of that State with distinction during the Mexican war. Col. Duncan raised, equipped and transported his regiment to Virginia entirely at his own expense. The Kentuckians are armed with Minnie rifles. They are specially detailed to guard the strongly fortified Maryland Heights, the key to the whole position."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 17 May, 1861 - The Kentucky troops

"It arrived after a much faster run than the one to Manassas – this time it carried no load – and was ready for Bartow's Second Brigade men to start boarding the cars by sundown. He got the 7th amd 8th Georgia Regiments aboard but did not have room to mount the rest of the brigade, which left the 9th Georgia and the 1st Kentucky stranded for the time being."

"We received orders to proceed to Richmond, where we landed on June 20, 1861. About the 10th day of July we were ordered to Manassas. On the way to Manassas we were in a railroad wreck. The Kentucky troops lost 32 men killed and wounded, but we escaped without the loss of a man."

Reminiscences of the boys in Grey, 1861-65: Private J. P. O'Rear, 1st Texas Infantry, Company D

"Apparently it departed shortly before or after Smith's engine, and carried the First Kentucky, the remainder of the Eleventh Mississippi, and probably the First Tennessee. They started out all right, but unexpectedly the engine suffered a collision – with what no one specified – and the cars could go no farther."

Battle at Bull Run: A history of the first major campaign of the Civil War by W C Davis

"I was appointed a Capt of Staff by Davis & ordered from Richmond to Genl Johnston's Army at Winchester, and there was placed as Ass Adj Genl with Col Elzeys Brigade – was assigned as field officer to Kentucky Battalion 3 days after, & [marched] as major in that command, to relieve Genl Beauregard – was detained by Genl Johnston at Piedmont and arrived here yesterday, the day after the battle the results of which are most glorious to us."

Thomas Claiborne papers, June-August 1861, dated near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 24 July, 1861, supplied by Samanatha Crisp, Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, The University of North Carolina

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 23, Serial No.35: Record of events for First Regiment, Kentucky Infantry (Confederate), April 1861-May 1862, edited by James B Hewett

Report of the adjutant general of the State of Kentucky: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers, War 1861–65, Volume 1, printed by the authority of the legislature of kentucky

Confederate military history: A library of Confederate States history, written by distinguished men of the South, Volume IX, edited by Clement A Evans

Notes

The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was accepted in Confederate service at Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, on 23 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st Kentucky Infantry was organised by Special Orders No.117, Paragraph VIII, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 7 August, 1861.

Cynthiana, Harrison County, to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, 22-23 April, 1861: Desha's Independent Company was ordered to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, on 22 April, 1861, and arrived via Paris, Bourbon County, and Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky, the same day. The company was accepted in state service at Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, on 23 April, 1861.

Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, to Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, 23 April, 1861: The Bustard Guards and Desha's Independent Company were ordered to proceed by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad to Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, under the command of Acting Major H B Duncan, on 23 April, 1861, and were accompanied by the Duncan Rifles and the Cornwall Guards (See the 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry). The companies arrived by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad at Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, the same day.

Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, to Lynchburg, Virginia, 25 April-2 May, 1861: The Bustard Guards and Desha's Independent Company, under the command of Captain J Desha, were ordered to proceed by the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad to Lynchburg, Virginia, at 3 PM on 25 April, 1861, and were accompanied by the Duncan Rifles, the Cornwall Guards, the Alexander Guards, and Bowman's Company. The companies arrived by the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad at Camp Duncan, near Lynchburg, Virginia, via Chattanooga, Hamilton County; Knoxville, Knox County; and Bristol, Sullivan County, Tennessee, in the morning on 2 May, 1861.

Lynchburg to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 2-4 May 1861: The Bustard Guards and Desha's Independent Company were ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the evening on 2 May, 1861, and were accompanied by the Duncan Rifles, the Cornwall Guards, and the Alexander Guards. The companies arrived by the Winchester & Potomac Railroad via Charlottesville, Albemarle County; Gordonsville, Orange County; Manassas Junction; Strasburg, Shenandoah County; and Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, in the evening on 4 May, 1861.

Mustered in one year, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 9 & 11 May, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company A, was mustered in Confederate service for one year at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, by Captain G W Carr, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 9 May, 1861, dated 23 April, 1861, and Company B for one year on 11 May, 1861, dated 23 April, 1861.

Note: First Lieutenant G W Carr, 9th United States Infantry, Company I, resigned on 20 February, 1861, and was appointed captain, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 16 March, 1861. Captain G W Carr, infantry, Confederate States Army, arrived at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 21 April, 1861.

Maryland Heights, opposite Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 15 May-12 June, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was stationed at Maryland Heights, opposite Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 15 May, 1861, and was ordered to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 12 June, 1861.

Latrobe & Wernwag Bridge, on the Potomac River, Company B, 13-14 June, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company B, was ordered to the Latrobe & Wernwag Bridge, on the Potomac River, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, under the command of Major H C Whiting, chief engineer, Army of the Shenandoah, in the evening on 13 June, 1861, and destroyed the Latrobe & Wernwag Bridge, on the Potomac River, near Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, between 4 and 6 AM on 14 June, 1861.

Evacuation Harpers Ferry, Virginia, 15 June 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters evacuated Harpers Ferry, Virginia, in the morning on 15 June, 1861, arrived by the Charlestown Turnpike at Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 3 PM the same day. The battalion arrived at Camp Hickory, near Bull Skin Run, between Charlestown, Jefferson County, and Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, in the evening on 15 June, 1861.

Charlestown, Jefferson County, to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, 16 June, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 9 AM on 16 June, 1861, and arrived via Smithfield, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the afternoon the same day. The battalion encamped on Mill Creek, near Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the evening on 16 June, 1861.

Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, to Stephenson's Depot, Frederick County, Virginia, 17 June, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was ordered to proceed by the Valley Turnpike to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 7 AM on 17 June, 1861, and arrived at Camp Defiance, near Stephenson's Depot, Frederick County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was assigned to the Second Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, under the command of Colonel F S Bartow, 8th Georgia Infantry, at Camp Defiance, near Stephenson's Depot, Frederick County, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861.

Stephenson's Depot to Hollingsworth Grove, one mile southeast of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, 21-26 June, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was ordered one mile south of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 21 June, 1861, and proceeded to Hollingsworth Grove, one mile southeast of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 26 June, 1861.

Hollingsworth Grove, one mile southeast of Winchester, Frederick County, to Darkesville, Berkeley County, Virginia, 2-7 July, 1861: The 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters was ordered to proceed by the Valley Turnpike to Darkesville, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 12 PM on 2 July, 1861, and arrived via Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 10 AM on 3 July, 1861. The battalion was ordered to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 11 AM on 7 July, 1861, and arrived at Hollingsworth Grove, one mile southeast of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 6 PM the same day.

Note: Acting Major & Captain J D Pope, 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, and First Lieutenant P M Victor, 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company A, resigned at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861, and the 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company A, under the command of Second Lieutenant W H Rowan, and the 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Company B, were assigned to the 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry between 17 and 18 July, 1861.

The 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.1, Headquarters, Army of the Shenandoah, Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 1 AM on 18 July, 1861.

Winchester, Frederick County, to Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, Virginia, 18-19 July, 1861: The 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Millwood Turnpike to Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, Virginia, at 1 PM on 18 July, 1861, and arrived at Berry's Ferry, on the Shenandoah River, via Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia, at 9 PM the same day. The battalion was ordered across the Shenandoah River at Berry's Ferry, Clarke County, Virginia, in the evening on 18 July, 1861, and arrived at Paris, Fauquier County, Virginia, via Ashby's Gap at 3 AM 19 July, 1861. The 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was ordered to Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, Virginia, at 5 AM the same day and arrived at 11 AM 19 July, 1861.

Note: Lieutenant Colonel H B Duncan's resignation was accepted by Special Orders No.101, Paragraph IX, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 19 July, 1861, and was appointed a volunteer aid to General J E Johnston at the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861. H B Duncan proceeded to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, on 20 August, 1861.

Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 22 July, 1861: The 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Manassas Gap Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, under the command of Major T Claiborne, in the afternoon on 20 July, 1861, and was detained by a collision on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at 9 PM the same day (See the 1st Texas Infantry). The battalion arrived at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the morning on 22 July, 1861.

Note: The collison on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad killed and wounded thirty-two men of the 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry on 20 July, 1861, and Colonel J H Forney, 10th Alabama Infantry, was assigned to command the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, and all troops stationed at Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, Virginia, by General Orders No.1, Headquarters, Fifth Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, on 21 July, 1861 (See the 10th Alabama Infantry).

Ater the first battle of Manassas the 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was stationed at Camp Victory, near the Lewis House, Portici, on the Bull Run River, between 22 and 27 July, 1861, and at Sudley Mills, Prince William County, Virginia, between 27 and 31 July, 1861.

Note: Captain J D Pope and First Lieutenant P M Victor, Bustard Guards, were ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.122, Paragraph VI, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 13 August, 1861, and was recinded and their resignations accepted by Special Orders No.133, Paragraph I, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 24 August, 1861.

Sudley Mills, Prince William County, to Smith's Farm, two & a half miles east of Manassas Junction, Virginia, 31 July, 1861: The 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was ordered to Smith's Farm, two and a half miles east of Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 31 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Bartow, on Smith's Farm, two and a half miles east of Manassas Junction, Virginia, the same day.

Note: The 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry was assigned to the 1st Kentucky Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, and F, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel T H Taylor and Major B M Anderson, at Camp Bartow, on Smith's Farm, two and a half miles east of Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 15 August, 1861.

Smith's Farm, two & a half miles east of Manassas Junction, Virginia, 31 July-11 September, 1861: The 1st Kentucky Infantry was stationed at Camp Bartow, on Smith's Farm, two and a half miles east of Manassas Junction, Virginia, between 31 July and 11 September, 1861 (See the 1st Kentucky Infantry).

Note: Lieutenant Colonel T H Taylor, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was appointed colonel, 1st Kentucky Infantry, on 14 October, 1861; Major W P Johnston, 3rd Kentucky Infantry, lieutenant colonel, 1st Kentucky Infantry, by Special Orders No.144, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 14 October, 1861; and Captain E Crossland, Company C, major, 1st Kentucky Infantry, on 16 November, 1861 (See the 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry). Major B M Anderson, 1st Kentucky Infantry, was appointed lieutenant colonel, 3rd Kentucky Infantry, on 18 October, 1861.

Mustered out, Camp Winder, near Richmond, Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, 13 May, 1862: The 1st Kentucky Infantry, Companies C and D, were mustered out at Camp Winder, near Richmond, Virginia, by Second Lieutenant W H Porter, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 13 May, 1862.

Major T Claiborne, Jr., 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry, 16 July, 1861: Captain T Claiborne, Jr., United States Mounted Riflemen, resigned on 14 May, 1861, and was appointed captain infantry, Confederate States Army, on 10 July, 1861, dated 16 March, 1861. Captain T Claiborne, Jr., infantry, Confederate States Army, was ordered to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.93, Paragraph II, Adjutant & Inspectors General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, the same day and was appointed assistant adjutant general, Fourth Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, on 13 July, 1861. Assistant Adjutant General & Captain T Claiborne, Jr., infantry, Confederate States Army, was appointed major, 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry, on 16 July, 1861.

Colonel T H Taylor, 1st Kentucky Infantry, 14 October, 1861: T H Taylor was appointed captain, cavalry, Confederate States Army, on 8 April, 1861, and lieutenant colonel, cavalry, Confederate States Army, at Richmond, Virginia, on 3 July, 1861. Lieutenant Colonel T H Taylor, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the Kentucky Battalion Infantry at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.117, Paragraph VIII, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Virginia, on 7 August, 1861, and proceeded by the Virginia Central Railroad on 8 August, 1861. He was appointed colonel, 1st Kentucky Infantry, on 14 October, 1861.

Colonel F S Bartow, 8th Georgia Infantry, Second Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah: Captain F S Bartow, Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Company A, was appointed colonel, 8th Georgia Infantry, on 1 June, 1861, and was assigned to command the Second Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, on 17 June, 1861.

Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, 25 September, 1861: Major General G W Smith, Confederate States Army, was assigned to the command of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.31, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, on 25 September, 1861.

The 1st Kentucky Infantry was assigned to the Second Brigade, Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Brigadier General S A M Jones, on 25 September, 1861.