The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah

Captain J D Imboden

Captain J D Imboden, Staunton Artillery, circa 1860

Staunton Artillery

Mustered in Confederate service for one year dated 1 July, 1861. Arrived at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 20 July, 1861. Stationed at Camp Walker, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, one mile south of McLean's Ford, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861

CAPTAIN J D IMBODEN
J D Imboden was appointed captain, Staunton Artillery, at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, on 17 April, 1861.

Section: FIRST LT. T L HARMAN
T L Harman was appointed first lieutenant, Staunton Artillery, at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, on 17 April, 1861, and died of typhoid at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, on 10 September, 1861.

Two 6 pounder smoothbores, M1841

Section: SECOND LT. A W GARBER
A W Garber was appointed second lieutenant, Staunton Artillery, at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, on 17 April, 1861, and was wounded at the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861. First Lieutenant A W Garber, Staunton Artillery, was appointed captain, Staunton Artillery, on 13 December, 1862.

Two 6 pounder smoothbores, M1841

Naval Batteries On Bolivar Heights

Several naval batteries of two 32 pounder pieces mounted on ships carriages were stationed at Bolivar Heights, one and a half miles west of Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, under the command of First Lieutenant C M Fauntleroy, Confederate States Navy, on 23 May, 1861.

Note: First Lieutenant C M Fauntleroy, United States Navy, resigned on 7 April, 1861, and was dismissed by the Secretary of the Navy G Welles on 13 May, 1861. He was appointed first lieutenant, Confederate States Navy, on 10 June, 1861, and was stationed at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, between 23 June and 1 July, 1861. First Lieutenant C M Fauntleroy was assigned as ordnance officer to General J E Johnston, Confederate States Army, at the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861.

One Hundred and Sixtieth Virginia Militia (Augusta County)

Colonel W D Anderson

The 160th Virginia Militia (Augusta County), Companies A and B, under the command of Colonel W D Anderson, were mustered in Confederate service by Major M G Harman, Provisional Army of Virginia, at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia on 29 June, 1861.

Regimental muster, Spring Hill, Augusta County, Virginia, 160th Virginia Militia (Augusta County), 9 May, 1861: The 160th Virginia Militia (Augusta County) was ordered to muster at Spring Hill, Augusta County, Virginia, on 9 May, 1861.

Organisation of 160th Virginia Militia (Augusta County): Colonel W D Anderson; Company A, Captain P H Trout; Company B, Captain G B Taylor

Sources

"The Culpeper Minute Men turned out on Wednesday evening, and were addressed in a very feeling and patriotic address by Capt. Patton, after which some twenty or thirty new members were enrolled. The Culpeper Observer says: 'At 9 o'clock at night they again formed into line and marched to the Court House, where they remained until the arrival of the train at day break, the next morning, when they were joined by the West Augusta Guards, Staunton Artillery, Gordonsville Greys and Montpelier Guards from orange C. H. In addition to the Minute Men, the Letcher Artillery, Capt. Freeman, left - the two Companies numbering about one hundred."

Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, Alexandria County, Virginia), 23 April, 1861 - Virginia news

"On Wednesday morning last, orders were received in this place from Richmond, for the Volunteer companies of the county to prepare for service. The two companies in town set about it immediately, and messengers were dispatched to notify the companies in the county. Capt. J. D. Imboden came up from Richmond on the afternoon train, with orders which were communicated to the officers alone. In the meantime, Maj. Gen. Harper had received orders to proceed to Winchester, to take command of the troops to be assembled there. It was understood that the Staunton Artillery, Capt. Imboden, and the West Augusta Guard, Capt. Baylor, would start East in a special train at 6 o'clock, P. M."

"Equal alacrity was displayed by the volunteer companies in the county. At a half hours notice, the men left their homes and started to town. They were coming in during Wednesday evening and all day Thursday; and on Friday morning the Mountain Guard, Capt. Doyle, the Middlebrook Company, Capt. Williams, and the Greenville Company, Capt. Newton, marched down the valley. The New Hope Cavalry, Capt. Patrick, started on Friday on the same route."

Staunton Spectator & Vindicator (Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia), 23 April, 1861 - Marching of troops

"About 400 troops are supposed to be at the Point of Rocks, and are strongly posted on the Virginia side. They comprise two companies of artillery from Leesburg and Staunton, two companies of cavalry from Fauquier and Leesburg, together with Captain Bradley T. Johnson's Frederick company and a company of Baltimore 'Southern volunteers,' which reached there this morning."

National Republican (Washington, D. C.), 13 May, 1861 - From the Point of Rocks, Frederick County, 10 May, 1861

"The following companies left this place during the past week: On Saturday the 12th, Rockbridge Artillery, Capt. W. N. Pendleton; on Monday, the 13th, Staunton Rifles, Capt. Asher W. Harman, and West View Infantry, Capt. St. Francis C. Roberts; on Tuesday, Churchville Cavalry, Capt. Sterrett; on Wednesday, Alleghany Light Infantry, Capt. Thompson McAllister, and Ready Rifles of Augusta, Capt. O. F. Grinnan; on Thursday, Rockbridge Greys, Capt. James G. Updike, and, on Saturday, about one hundred soldiers enlisted in the regular army. On Monday of this week, Greenbrier Rifles, Capt. Robert F. Dennis, and Hibernians, Capt. H. H. Robertson; on Tuesday, Monroe Guard, Capt. Tiffany, and Alleghany Rifles, Capt. Holloway. Other companies will leave in a few days."

Staunton Spectator & Vindicator (Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia), 21 May, 1861 - Departure of troops

"Harper's Ferry, 21 May - There is a considerable force below us at the Point of Rocks, prepared to resist the passage of troops over the Bridge or up the Railroad. Among the Virginia forces there, we hear of Capt. Ashby's Mounted Rangers, Capt. Roger's Loudoun Artillery, a part of Capt. Imboden's command from this post, Capt. Carter's Company of Cavalry, and Captain Winfield's Company of Rifles."

Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, Alexandria County, Virginia), 23 May, 1861 - Letter from Harper's Ferry

"By order of Maj. Gen. Lee, Maj. M. G. Harman, Commandant of this post, called into service of the State the whole of the militia of Staunton, comprised in the Companies A and B."

Staunton Spectator (Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia), 2 July, 1861 - Staunton militia called into service

Books/ Manuscripts

The Staunton Artillery, McClanahan's Battery, First Edition, No.Unknown, by R. J. Driver, Jr.

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 70, Serial No.82: Record of events for Garber's Company, Virginia Light Artillery, June 1861-February 1865, edited by James B. Hewett

"His men also discovered in the armory some strong horse carts, and some of the men who were mechanically inclined used these axles and wheels to make caissons that served well through the First Battle of Manassas."

"On June 30 Imboden's Battery had 107 officers and men. It had its four bronze, 6-pounder guns as well as the old-style heavy artillery sabers they had received when they had mustered in. Imboden reported that the men were clothed 'cadet grey uniforms' supplied by a firm in Augusta, consisting of a grey cap, a flannel shirt, grey woolen pants, and woolen socks."

"While his infantry moved to Manassas by rail, Johnston ordered the artillery batteries to travel by secondary roads. He directed his chief of artillery, Col. William N Pendleton, to form a column of his five batteries: the four brigade batteries and the one reserve. But by nightfall on July 19, only three of the five batteries had arrived at Piedmont, and Pendleton set out in the dark with these."

Brigadier General John D Imboden: Confederate commander in the Shenandoah, by Spencer Tucker

A guide to Virginia military organisations 1861-1865, revised Second Edition, by I. A. Wallace, Jr.

Notes

The Staunton Artillery was accepted in state service for one year at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, on 17 April, 1861.

Seizure of Harpers Ferry Arsenal & Armory, 17-19 April, 1861

The Staunton Artillery was ordered to seize Harpers Ferry Arsenal and Armory, on Shenandoah and Potomac Streets, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 17 April, 1861.

Note: Captain J D Imboden, Staunton Artillery, was stationed at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, in the evening on 16 April, 1861, and arrived by the Virginia Central Railroad at Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, at 5 PM on 17 April, 1861.

Staunton, Augusta County, to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 17-18 April, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, under the command of Brigadier General W H Harman, Thirteenth Brigade, Fifth Division, Virginia Militia, at 6 PM on 17 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the West Augusta Guards (See the 5th Virginia Infantry). The company arrived at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, at 10.30 PM the same day and by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 3 AM on 18 April, 1861. The Staunton Artillery arrived at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, in the morning the same day.

Note: The Charlottesville & University Battalion Infantry was stationed at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, at 10.30 PM on 17 April, 1861, and the Culpeper Minutemen at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 3 AM on 18 April, 1861.

Manassas Junction, Prince William County, to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 18-19 April, 1861: The Staunton Artillery arrived by the Manassas Gap Railroad to Strasburg, Shenandoah County, Virginia, at 11 AM on 18 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Valley Turnpike to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, in the afternoon the same day. The company arrived at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, in the evening on 18 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Winchester & Potomac Railroad to Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 9 PM the same day. The Staunton Artillery was ordered to proceed by the by the Middleway, Charlestown & Harpers Ferry Turnpike to Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 12 AM on 19 April, 1861, and arrived via Halltown and Bolivar Heights, one and a half miles west of Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, at 4 AM the same day.

Note: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to procure horses at Strasburg, Shenandoah County, Virginia, in the morning on 18 April, 1861.

State & Confederate Service

The Staunton Artillery was stationed at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, under the command of major General K Harper, Fifth Division, Virginia Militia, on 19 April, 1861, and was ordered to Loudoun Heights, one mile south of Harpers Ferry Jefferson County, Virginia, at 11 PM on 20 April, 1861.

Note: The Southern Guards was ordered to Loudoun Heights, one mile south of Harpers Ferry Jefferson County, Virginia, at 11 PM on 20 April, 1861, and the West Augusta Guards and a section of the Staunton Artillery was stationed at Bolivar Heights, one and a half miles west of Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 22 April, 1861.

Mustered for the war, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 3 May, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was mustered in state service for the war at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, by Colonel T J Jackson, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 3 May, 1861.

Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, to Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, 6 May, 1861: A detachment of the Staunton Artillery (23), under the command of Captain J D Imboden, was ordered to the Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, on 6 May, 1861, and was stationed at the Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, between 6 and 27 May, 1861.

Note: Captain T Ashby, Fauquier Mountain Rangers, was assigned to command the troops stationed at the Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, between 19 April and 9 June, 1861 (See the 7th Virginia Cavalry).

Troops stationed at Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, 20 May, 1861: Captain T Ashby, Fauquier Mountain Rangers; Fauquier Mountain Rangers, First Lieutenant R Ashby; Loudoun Light Horse, Captain R W Carter; Letcher Brock's Gap Rifles, Captain J Q Winfield; Baltimore Rifles, Captain C C Edelin; Frederick Volunteers, Captain B T Johnson; section of Staunton Artillery, Captain J D Imboden; Loudoun Artillery, Captain A L Rogers

Note: Lieutenant Colonel & Assistant Adjutant General G Deas, Confederate States Army, was stationed at the Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, on 20 May, 1861.

Troops stationed at & in the vicinity of Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, 23 May, 1861: 2nd Virginia Infantry, Colonel J W Allen; 4th Virginia Infantry, Colonel J F Preston; 5th Virginia Infantry, Colonel K Harper; 10th Virginia Infantry, Colonel S B Gibbons; 13th Virginia Infantry, Colonel A P Hill; 2nd Mississippi Infantry, Colonel W C Falkner; 11th Mississippi Infantry, Colonel W H Moore; 4th Alabama Infantry, Colonel E J Jones; 1st Maryland Infantry, Companies A, B, C (1st), D, D, F (1st), G, and H (1st), Captain G H Steuart, cavalry, Confederate States Army; 1st Kentucky Battalion Infantry, Companies A, B, C, and D, Major H B Duncan; 2nd Kentucky Battalion Sharpshooters, Companies A and B, Acting Major & Captain J D Pope, Bustard Guards; 1st Virginia Cavalry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G (1st), and H, Lieutenant Colonel J E B Stuart; 1st Rockbridge Artillery, Captain W N Pendelton; Wise Artillery, Captain E G Alburtis; Newtown Artillery, Captain G A Groves; Staunton Artillery, Captain J D Imboden

Note: The Loudoun Cavalry arrived at the Covered or Leesburg Bridge, on the Potomac River, opposite Point of Rocks, Frederick County, Maryland, on 23 May, 1861, and the Wise Artillery on 27 May, 1861.

Harpers Ferry to Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, Virginia, 30 May, 1861: A detachment of the Staunton Artillery (60), under the command of First Lieutenant T L Harman, was ordered to Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 30 May, 1861, and was accompanied by the 5th Virginia Infantry, Companies C and L, under the command of Captain R L Doyle, Company C (See the 5th Virginia Infantry).

Note: A detachment of the Staunton Artillery was stationed at the Covered Bridge, on the Potomac River, at Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, Virginia, under the command of Captain R L Doyle, 5th Virginia Infantry, Company C, on 30 May, 1861, and the Staunton Artillery was stationed at Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, on 6 June, 1861.

General Orders No.25, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, 8 June, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was assigned to the Confederate States by General Orders No.25, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 8 June, 1861, and was accepted in Confederate service on 1 July, 1861.

Evacuation Harpers Ferry, 15 June 1861

The Staunton Artillery evacuated Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the morning on 15 June, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Smithfield, Charlestown & Harpers Ferry Turnpike to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, the same day. The company arrived by the Berryville & Charleston Turnpike at Camp Johnston, F P Frame's, on the North or South Fork of Bull Skin Run, four miles west of Charlestown, Jefferson County, Virginia, in the evening on 15 June, 1861.

Camp Johnston, F P Frame's, on the North or South Fork of Bull Skin Run, four miles west of Charlestown, Jefferson County, to Mill Creek, a quarter of a mile north of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, 16 June, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 9 AM on 16 June, 1861, and arrived at Mill Creek, a quarter of a mile north of Bunker Hill, via Smithfield or Middleway, Berkeley County, Virginia, in the evening the same day.

Mill Creek, a quarter of a mile north of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, to Stephenson's Station, on the Winchester & Potomac Railroad, four miles northeast of Frederick County, Virginia, 17 June, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Martinsburg Turnpike to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 2 PM on 17 June, 1861, and arrived at Camp Defiance, Stephenson's Station, on the Winchester & Potomac Railroad, four miles northeast of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, in the evening the same day.

Note: The Staunton Artillery was assigned to the Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, under the command of Acting Brigadier General & Colonel W C Falkner, 2nd Mississippi Infantry, at Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861.

Camp Defiance, Stephenson's Station, on the Winchester & Potomac Railroad, four miles northeast of Winchester, to Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, 20 June, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, in the morning on 20 June, 1861, dated PM 19 June, 1861, and arrived at Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: Brigadier General B E Bee, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, at Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 19 June, 1861, and the Staunton Artillery (107) was stationed at Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 30 June, 1861.

Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, to Darkesville, Berkeley County, Virginia, 2-3 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Martinsburg Turnpike to Darkesville, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 12 PM on 2 July, 1861, and arrived via Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia, at 10 AM on 3 July, 1861.

Darkesville, Berkeley County, to Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, 7 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 11 AM on 7 July, 1861, and arrived at Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 8 PM the same day.

Note: The Staunton Artillery was stationed at Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, between 7 and 18 July, 1861.

March to Manassas Junction, 18-20 July, 1861

The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.1, Headquarters, Army of the Shenandoah, Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, at 2 PM on 18 July, 1861.

Apple Pie Ridge, half a mile northwest of Winchester, Frederick County, to Berry's Ferry, on the Shenandoah River, three & a half miles southeast of Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia, 18 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery arrived at Berry's Ferry, on the Shenandoah River, three and a half miles southeast of Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia, at 11 PM on 18 July, 1861.

Berry's Ferry, on the Shenandoah River, three & a half miles southeast of Millwood, Clarke County, to Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, Virginia, 18-19 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered across the Shenandoah River at Berry's Ferry, three and a half miles southeast of Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia, in the evening on 18 July, 1861, and arrived at Piedmont Station via Ashby's Gap, on the Blue Ridge Mountains, Clarke, Loudoun, and Fauquier Counties, and Paris and Upperville, Fauquier County, Virginia, at 9 PM on 19 July, 1861.

Piedmont Station, Fauquier County, to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 20 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, in the morning on the 20 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, via Salem and White Plains, Fauquier County, Virginia, in the evening the same day.

Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, to Orange & Alexandria Railroad, one & a half miles southwest of McLean's Ford, on the Bull Run River, 20-21 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery arrived at Camp Walker, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, one mile south of McLean's Ford, on the Bull Run River, at 11.30 PM on 20 July, 1861.

First battle of Manassas, 21 July, 1861

The Staunton Artillery was stationed at rear of McLean's and Blackburn's Ford's, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Note: The Staunton Artillery was ordered southwest of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, at 7 AM on 21 July, 1861.

Advance to Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Note: The Staunton Artillery was stationed on an eminence west of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, at 9 AM on 21 July, 1861.

East of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: Two 6 pounder 3 inch rifles of the Washington Battalion Artillery, under the command of First Lieutenant J B Richardson, Washington Battalion Artillery, 1st Company, arrived east of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 21 July, 1861 (See the Washington Battalion Artillery).

Note: Second Lieutenant A W Garber, Staunton Artillery, was wounded west of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Withdrawal southeast of I Henry's or Spring Hill, Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: Three 6 pounder smoothbores of the Staunton Artillery were ordered to withdraw southeast of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Note: Three 6 pounder smoothbores of the Staunton Artillery were assigned to Brigadier General T J Jackson, Confederate States Army, stationed 600 yards southeast of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, at 11.30 AM on 21 July, 1861 (See the First Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah).

600 yards southeast of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: The 4th Virginia Infantry and 27th Virginia Infantry were as support to three 6 pounder smoothbores of the Staunton Artillery at 11.30 AM on 21 July, 1861.

Note: The 1st Rockbridge Artillery, the Thomas Artillery, and Wise Artillery arrived southeast of I Henry's or Spring Hill, on Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the afternoon on 21 July, 1861.

Withdrawal southeast of Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: Three 6 pounder smoothbores of the Staunton Artillery were ordered to withdraw southeast of Henry Hill, one mile west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, on the afternoon on 21 July, 1861.

Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, via Salem and White Plains, Fauquier County, Virginia, 22 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was stationed at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, via Salem and White Plains, Fauquier County, Virginia, on 22 July, 1861.

Camp Walker, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, one mile south of McLean's Ford, McLean's Ford, to F Lewis' farm, a quarter of a mile southwest of Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, 23 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to F Lewis' farm, a quarter of a mile southwest of Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 23 July, 1861.

F Lewis' farm, a quarter of a mile southwest of Lewis' Ford, to Camp Bee, one & a half miles northwest of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 25 July, 1861: The Staunton Artillery arrived at Camp Bee, one and a half miles northwest of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the evening on 25 July, 1861.

Camp Bee, one & a half miles northwest of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, to Broad Run, half a mile north of Bristoe Station, Prince William County, Virginia, 3 August, 1861: The Staunton Artillery was ordered to Bristoe Station, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, Prince William County, Virginia, at 7 AM on 3 August, 1861, and was stationed at Camp Jones, on Broad Run, half a mile north of Bristoe Station, Prince William County, Virginia, between 3 August and 18 September, 1861.

Camp Jones, on Broad Run, half a mile north of Bristoe Station, to one mile west of Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, 18-20 September, 1861: The Staunton Artillery arrived at Powell's Run, two and a half miles northwest of Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, on 18 September, 1861, and was stationed at Camp Law, one mile west of Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, between 20 September and 25 October, 1861.

Reorganised at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 22 April, 1862: The Staunton Artillery was reorganised at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, under the command of Captain W L Balthis, on 22 April, 1862.

Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, 9 April, 1865: The Staunton Artillery, under the command of Captain A W Garber, surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

Brigadier General B E Bee, Confederate States Army, Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah: Captain B E Bee, 10th United States Infantry, Company D, resigned on 3 March, 1861, and was appointed lieutenant colonel, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 4 May, 1861. Lieutenant Colonel B E Bee, infantry, Confederate States Army, was appointed brigadier general, Confederate States Army, at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861, and was mortally wounded at the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861. He was mortally wounded in the stomach during the battle of first Manassas on 21 July, 1861, and died one mile northeast of Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 22 July, 1861.

Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, 25 September, 1861: Major General G W Smith, Confederate States Army, was assigned to the command of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.31, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 25 September, 1861.

The Staunton Artillery was assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division, Potomac District, Department of Northern Virginia, under the command of Brigadier General W H C Whiting, Confederate States Army, by General Orders No.15, Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 22 October, 1861.

Report

THE REBELLION RECORD: A Diary of American Events, Volume II, Documents, pp43-45
Captain J D Imboden, Staunton Artillery, dated in the vicinity of Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 22 July, 1861

Supplement to the Official Records, Volume 1, REPORTS TO ADDENDUM: Series I, Volume 2, pp185-189
Major H C Whiting, Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, dated Camp Bee, on the Bull Run River, 1 August, 1861

Supplement to the Official Records, Volume 1, REPORTS TO ADDENDUM: Series I, Volume 2, pp191-193
Adjutant General & Brigadier General S R Gist (South Carolina), Major R A Howard (Texas), and Captain A Vander Horst (South Carolina), aides to Brigadier General B E Bee, Third Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah