The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Second Brigade, Second Division

Lieutenant Colonel J S Pitman, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry

Lieutenant Colonel J S Pitman, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry

First Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry

Arrived at Washington, D. C., 26 and 30 April, 1861. Mustered in United States service for three months 2 May, 1861

COLONEL A E BURNSIDE
Colonel A E Burnside was assigned to command the Second Brigade, Second Division, McDowell's Army, prior to the first battle of Bull Run.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL J S PITMAN
Lieutenant Colonel J S Pitman was assigned to duty at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 19 June, 1861, and was not present at the first battle of Bull Run.

MAJOR J P BALCH
Major J S Slocum resigned in May 1861 and was appointed colonel, 2nd Rhode Island Infantry, on 8 May, 1861 (See the 2nd Rhode Island Infantry). Second Major J P Balch was appointed major, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, on 27 June, 1861, and was assigned to command the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, prior to the first battle of Bull Run. Colonel W Goddard was assigned to the staff of Governor W Sprague and was appointed second major, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, on 27 June, 1861.

Company A National Cadets: CAPT. A F DEXTER
The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Company B Providence Artillery: CAPT. N VAN SLYCK
The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Company C First Light Infantry No.1: CAPT. W W BROWN
The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861, and Private W H Helme was assigned to the the United States Corps Topographical Engineers, Balloon Detachment, under the command of First Lieutenant H L Abbot, on 14 July, 1861 (See the United States Corps Topographical Engineers).
Company D First Light Infantry No.2: CAPT. N W BROWN
The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Company E Pawtucket Light Guard: CAPT. S R BUCKLIN
The company was organised at Pawtucket, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861, and was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Company F Newport Artillery: CAPT. G W TEW
The company was accepted in state service at Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861 and was ordered to Sayers Wharf, Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island, at 11.30 AM on 17 April, 1861. The company was ordered to proceed by the steamer Perry to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, at 1 PM the same day and encamped at the Railroad Hall, on Exchange Street, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, in the evening on 17 April, 1861. The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, the same day.
Company G Mechanic Rifles No.1: CAPT. J T PITMAN
The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, under the command of Captain D A Peloubet, on 17 April, 1861, and Captain D A Peloubet was detached at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, on 26 April, 1861. He was ordered to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, shortly afterwards and First Lieutenant J T Pitman was mustered in United States service at Washington, D. C., on 6 May, 1861.
Company H Mechanic Rifles No.2: CAPT. C W H DAY
The company was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Company I Westerly Rifles: CAPT. H C CARD
The company was organised at Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861, and was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Company K Woonsocket Guards: CAPT. P SIMPSON, Jr.
The company was organised at Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861, and was accepted in state service at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861.
Unlettered Company Carbineers: CAPT. F W GODDARD
The company was assigned to the 1st Rhode island Detached Militia Infantry at Washington, D. C., on 9 June, 1861.
American Brass Band: Band Ldr. J C Greene
The American Brass Band was organised at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, with twenty-four musicians in April 1861 and accompanied the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry to Washington, D. C., on 19 April, 1861. The band was assigned to duty caring for the wounded and dying at the first battle of Bull Run.
Note: Private H A DeWitt was assigned as an engineer on 31 May, 1861.

Sources

"About half past twelve o'clock yesterday the train in which the Washington Light Guards, Captain S. A. H. Marks, went to the Junction, returned, bringing with them Gen. B. F. Butler's Massachusetts brigade, comprising the fifth and eighth regiments, and a portion of Governor Sprague's Rhode Island regiment."

The National Republican, 27 April, 1861 - Arrival of troops

"The steamer Empire State arrived this forenoon, with a detachment of the First Rhode Island Regiment. They leave on the steamer Bienville tonight."

The Evening Star, 27 April, 1861 - New York, Albany, 25 April, 1861

"The following positions, as nearly as we can learn, are occupied by the northern troops in and around Washington: The 5th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Schwarzwealder, 1,100 men, is quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pinckney, 850 men, is quartered in the City of Washington and at Annapolis. The 7th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lefferts, 1,300 men, is encamped on Prospect Hill, a mile from the White House. The 8th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lyons, 960 men, occupy the Relay House, and a detachment is also stationed at Annapolis. The 12th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Butterfield, 950 men, is quartered in the City. The 13th Regiment N.Y.S.M. (Brooklyn), Colonel Smith, 1,100 men, is stationed at Annapolis. The 20th Regiment (Ulster) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pratt, 800 men, is stationed in Washington. The 25th Regiment (Albany) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Bryan, 800 men, is quartered in Washington. The 28th Regiment (Brooklyn) N.Y.S.M., Colonel M. Bennett, 550 men, is quartered in Washington. The 69th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Corcoran, 1,100 men, is quartered on Georgetown Heights, near the college. The 71st Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Vosburgh, 1,100 men, occupy the Navy yard. They also have control of three boats on the river, manned with 75 men each. The Alexandria bridge is also in charge of the 71st, 150 men stationed on the bridge with three pieces of ordnance. The 1st Regiment Firemen Zouaves (Volunteers), Colonel E. E. Ellsworth, 1,015 men, will soon be encamped on Georgetown Heights. They have been quartered in the Capital. Governor Sprague's Rhode Islanders, Colonel Burnside, 1,100 men, are quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment Massachusetts occupies the Relay House, nine miles from Baltimore. The 8th Massachusetts Regiment is quartered in Washington. A Regiment of pennsylvania troops is stationed at the Relay House with the Massachusetts 6th and New York 8th, while the remainder is stationed in Washington. The 4th New jersey Regiment has gone into encampment on Merdian Hill, near the camp of the New York 7th. About 2,700 New Jersey soldiers are quartered in Washington."

The Belmont Chronicle (St Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio), 16 May, 1861 - Positions of Northern troops in the South

"At 6 o'clock last evening, a special train of twenty-two cars left the Washington depot, containing the battery, horses, wagons, and camp equipage of the Rhode Island Artillery Regiment, Col. Burnside. The battery consists of six pieces, of Gen. James' rifle patent, with caissons attached. About 100 men accompanied the train. At daybreak this morning, the remainder of the Rhode Island Regiment brke up camp, and left by cars for Baltimore, en route for Chambersburg."

The Evening Star, 10 June, 1861 - Movement of troops from Washington, exit by railroad and turnpike

"The first Rhode Island regiment was mustered into service on 18th of April, and a detachment of the same started for this city the following day; but the regiment was not sworn in till 2d of May."

The National Republican, 2 July, 1861- The three months' troops - camp Sprague, Washington, D. C., 1 July, 1861

"On Saturday, 15th instant, General Cadwallader reached this place, from Greencastle, with six regiments, among whom were the Rhode Island regiment, McMullen's rangers, and the Fort Sumter boys, and never did soldiers receive a more hearty welcone than did they to our town."

The National Republican, 20 June, 1861 - The crossing of the troops from Willamsport, 18 June, 1861

"The tailor-become-soldier outfitted his regiment in grey trousers and a loose blue pullover blouse with long tails that hung like a frock coat. Instead of issuing overcoats, he drew on his Mexican War observations and ordered blankets with slit for wear like ponchos, thus saving his soldiers the extra burden of a heavy coat."

"Burnside's brigade typified an untidy diversification of arms and equipment in that infant national army. His Rhode Islanders, though dressed similarly in blue blouses and grey trousers, with broadbrimmed black hats, were not armed the same: the 1st regiment carried new Springfield rifles, while the 2nd had had to settle for old .69 calibre smoothbores. The 2nd New Hampshire, in its grey uniforms and forage caps, could have passeed for Confederates; it also shouldered the short-range smoothbores, except for Company B: courtesy of the private donations of Concord citizen, Company B went to war equipped with the new Sharps breechloading rifles. The 71st New York wore its own version of the antebellum militia uniform, dressed down for the field, but the weapons it carried remain a mystery."

Burnside, by William Marvel

"A company of Carbineers, to act as skirmishers, was formed, by details from the other companies, 1st Rhode Island (Detached Militia) Infantry, and armed with the Burnside rifles. On the 19 June, 1861 it was organised as a separate corps, and its place in the line of march was in front of the column. Its officers were appointed as follows: Francis W Goddard, commissioned as Captain. Walter B Manton, commissioned as Lieutenant. John B Campbell, of Company A, Sergeant. George O Gorton, of Company C, Sergeant. Robert H Deming, of Company D, Sergeant. Louis T Hall, of Company G, Sergeant. Peleg E Bryant, of Company B, Sergeant.

The Company numbered seventy-three privates, but its members messed, quartered, and were paid with their respective companies. Consequently no roll was preserved.

Burnside also took two companies of the Burnside Carbineers (a Zouave Unit) as sharpshooters to accompany the First Regiment. The Burnside Carbineers were under the command of Captain Francis W Goddard. The Carbineers were armed with the deadly Burnside Carbine lever action fast firing breach loader."

"The white havelocks, which our friends at home had provided, the red blankets, and the blue blouses formed a good combination of the national colours; the regimental band played its most patriotic strains, and the men kept martial step to the music of the Union."

Narrative of the campaign of the First Rhode Island Regiment, in the spring and summer of 1861, by Augustus Woodbury

"The Regimental Band contains 22 musicians. The uniform of the Regiment consists of the regulation hat, a loose blue blouse, and grey pantaloons. A plain leather belt around the waist sustains the cartridge-box, the bayonet, and six-barrelled revolver, with which each man is armed. The officers are distinguished by a small gold strap on the shoulders; they wear a sash and a long sabre, and a revolver supported by a plain belt."

Rebellion Record: Document 80, Gov. Sprague's Rhode Islanders, New York Tribune, 22 April, 1861

"These consisted of a light blue blouse, of the Garibaldi pattern, dark grey pants, and Kossuth hat, with the brim turned up on the right side, and fastened to the crown with a brass plate, eagle shaped."

History of Company F, 1st Regiment, R.I. Volunteers, during the spring and summer of 1861, by Charles H Clarke

Supplement to the Official Records: Part II, Record of Events, Volume 63, Serial No.75: Record of events for First Rhode Island Detached Militia (Three months), May-August 1861, edited by James B Hewett

Major General Ambrose E. Burnside and the Ninth Army Corps: A narrative of campaigns in North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee, during the war for the preservation of the republic, by Augustus Woodbury

The Union Army: A history of military affairs in the loyal states 1861-65, records of the regiments in the Union Army, cyclopedia of battles, memoirs of commanders and soldiers, Volume 1, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Delaware

Notes

The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Headquarters, No.48 Broad Street, Room No.6, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 17 April, 1861, by General Orders No.1, Headquarters, Rhode Island Militia, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was accepted in state service for three months at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 18 April, 1861.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

First Detachment

Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 19-20 April, 1861: The first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry (600), under the command of Colonel A E Burnside, was ordered to proceed by the steamer Empire State to Washington, D. C., at 2.30 PM on 19 April, 1861, and was accompanied by Governor W Sprague. The detachment arrived by the Hudson River at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 21-23 April, 1861: The first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the steamer Coatzacoalcos to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, under the command of Major E D Keyes, 1st United States Artillery, at 5.30 AM on 21 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane (See the First Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army). The detachment arrived by Chesapeake Bay at Fort Monroe, Old Comfort Point, Hampton, Virginia, at 10 PM on 22 April, 1861, and was ordered to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 2 PM on 23 April, 1861. The first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived by Chesapeake Bay at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, between 8 and 9 PM the same day and disembarked at the United States Naval Academy, near Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 2 PM on 24 April, 1861.

Steamer Baltic: 12th New York State Militia Infantry and First Lieutenant G W Synder, United States Corps Engineers, Major E D Keyes, 1st United States Artillery (See the Three Months Volunteers, Department of Washington); Steamer Columbia: 6th New York State Militia Infantry (See the Three Months Volunteers, Department of Annapolis); Steamer R R Cuyler: 71st New York State Militia Infantry (See the 71st New York State Militia Infantry). Steamer Coatzacoalcos: first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry.

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 25-26 April, 1861: The first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 5.30 AM on 25 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the 71st New York State Militia Infantry. The detachment arrived at Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 8 AM on 26 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Washington, D. C., between 9 and 10 AM the same day. The first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was accompanied by the Washington Light Guards, the 8th Massachusetts Infantry, and four companies of the of the 5th Massachusetts Infantry. The detachment arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at Washington, D. C., at 12.30 PM on 26 April, 1861.

Patent Office, Washington, D. C., 26 April, 1861: The first detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was stationed at the Patent Office, Washington, D. C., on 26 April, 1861.

Second Detachment

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Washington, D. C., 24-28 April, 1861: The second detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel J S Pitman and Major J P Balch, arrived by the steamer Empire State at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 9 AM on 24 April, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the steamer Bienville to Washington, D. C., at 8 PM the same day. The detachment arrived by Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River at the Washington, D. C., at 12 PM on 28 April, 1861, and disembarked at the Arsenal, Greenlaef Point, Washington, D. C., on 29 April, 1861.

Patent Office, Washington, D. C., 29 April, 1861: The second detachment of the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was stationed at the Patent Office, Washington, D. C., on 29 April, 1861.

First Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry

The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived at the Patent Office, Washington, D. C., on 26 and 29 April, 1861.

Abstract from returns of the volunteer troops in the Department of Washington, Colonel J F K Mansfield, United States Army, commanding, 30 April, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was stationed at the Patent Office, Washington, D. C., on 30 April, 1861.

Patent Office, Washington, to near Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., 10 May, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was stationed at Camp Sprague, near Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., on 10 May, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., 2 May, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at the Capitol grounds, Washington, D. C., by Brevet Major & Assistant Adjutant General I McDowell, United States Army, on 2 May, 1861.

Occupation of Arlington Heights & Alexandria, Virginia, 24 May, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was assigned as a reserve during the occupation of Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, and Alexandria, Virginia, and a detail of twenty-six men to guard and operate the ferries on the Potomac River in the morning on 24 May, 1861 (See the Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria).

Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., to Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 10-11 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, under the command of Colonel A E Burnside, was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, by Special Orders No.99, Paragraph III, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., in the morning on 10 June, 1861, dated 8 June, 1861, and arrived by the Cumberland Valley Railroad at Chambersburg, Franklin County, via Baltimore City, Maryland, and Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, in the morning on 11 June, 1861.

Chambersburg to Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, three miles southwest of Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 11 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Franklin Railroad to Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, in the afternoon on 11 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery (See the Three Months' Volunteers, Department of Washington). The regiment arrived at Camp Duncan, on the Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, three miles southwest of Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, at 12 PM the same day.

Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, three miles southwest of Greencastle, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, 15 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 6 AM on 15 June, 1861, and arrived by the Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, two miles east of Williamsport, Washington County, Maryland, at 12 PM the same day.

Greencastle & Williamsport Turnpike, two miles east of Williamsport, Washington County, to Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, 17-18 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to Washington, D. C., at 7 AM on 17 June, 1861, and and arrived at Boonsboro via Hagerstown and Funkstown, Washington County, Maryland, at 3 PM the same day. The regiment arrived at Middletown, Frederick County, Maryland, at 5 PM on 17 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived in the vicinity of Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, at 12 AM on 18 June, 1861, and was ordered to Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, at 4 AM the same day.

Note: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery arrived at Boonsboro, Washington County, Maryland, in the afternoon on 17 June, 1861.

Frederick City, Frederick County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 18-19 June, 1861:The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad to Washington, D. C., at 7 PM on 18 June, 1861, and was accompanied by the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Artillery. The regiment arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, via Relay House, on the junction of the Washington Branch and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads, near Elkridge Landing, and Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 6 AM on 19 June, 1861.

Washington to Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., 19 June, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived at Camp Sprague, near Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, D. C., on 19 June, 1861.

Special Orders No.167, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Department of Washington, Washington, D. C., 2 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, the 2nd Rhode Island Infantry, the 71st New York State Militia Infantry, the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, and the 2nd Rhode Island Artillery was assigned to Colonel A E Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, by Special Orders No.167, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Department of Washington, Washington, D. C., on 2 July, 1861.

General Orders No.13, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, 8 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was assigned to the Second Brigade, Second Division, McDowell's Army, under the command of Colonel A E Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia, by General Orders No.13, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861.

Advance to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, 16-18 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 1.30 PM on 16 July, 1861, and proceeded across the Potomac River by the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., at 3 PM on 16 July, 1861. The regiment was ordered to proceed by the Columbia Turnpike to the Little River Turnpike at 4 PM the same day and arrived at Bailey's Crossroads, Fairfax County, via Fort Runyon, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, Virginia, at 7 PM on 16 July, 1861. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the morning on 17 July, 1861,and arrived by the Little River Turnpike at Fairfax Courthouse via Annandale, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 1 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to Germantown, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the morning on 18 July, 1861, and proceeded by the Warrenton Turnpike to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 4 PM the same day. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived at at Camp Bush, near Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the evening on 18 July, 1861.

Note: The 71st New York State Militia Infantry, Corps Engineers, and a detachment of the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry were assigned to clear the road for artillery on 16 July, 1861, and the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry encamped at Camp Bush, near Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 18 July, 1861.

Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, to Sudley Ford, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 2 AM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at 4.30 AM the same day. The regiment was ordered to Sudley Ford, on the Bull Run River, at 5.30 AM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at 9.30 AM the same day.

Retreat to Washington, D. C., 21-22 July, 1861: After the first battle of Bull Run the 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the afternoon on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at 9 PM the same day. The regiment was ordered to Washington, D. C., at 11 PM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived at Fort Runyon, near Columbia Springs, Alexandria County, via Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the morning on 22 July, 1861. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River by the Long Bridge, Washington, D. C., at 8 AM the same day and arrived at Camp Sprague, near Gales' woods or G Keating's Farm, east of North Capitol Street, on 22 July, 1861.

Mustered out, Providence, Providence, County, Rhode Island, 2 August, 1861: The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, in the afternoon on 25 July, 1861, and arrived at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, in the morning on 27 July, 1861. Four companies were ordered to proceed by the State of Maine and six companies and Colonel AE Burnside by the steamer Bay State to Providence, Providence, County, Rhode Island, at 1.30 PM on 27 July, 1861. The 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry arrived at Providence, Providence, County, Rhode Island, at 5 AM on 28 July, 1861, and was mustered out on 2 August, 1861.

Colonel A E Burnside, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, Second Brigade, Second Division, McDowell's Army: A E Burnside was stationed at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 15 April, 1861, and arrived at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, on 16 April, 1861. He was appointed colonel, 1st Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, the same day and brigadier general, United States Volunteers, by General Orders No.62, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 20 August, 1861, dated 6 August, 1861.

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.40: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp399-400
Major J P Balch, First Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, dated Camp Sprague, Keating's Farm, near the Old Bladensburg Road, D. C., 23 July, 1861

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.39: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp395-399
Colonel A E Burnside, First Rhode Island Detached Militia Infantry, Second Brigade, Second Division, McDowell's Army, dated Washington, D. C., 19 August, 1861

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.31: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp382-383
Colonel D Hunter, Third United States Cavalry, Second Division, McDowell's Army, dated Washington, D. C., 5 August, 1861