The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac

Private J McCanna, Lynchburg Artillery

Private J McCanna, Lynchburg Artillery

Lynchburg Artillery

Arrived at Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 25 May, 1861. Mustered in Confederate service for one year dated 1 July, 1861. Stationed at Lewis' Ford and the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861

CAPTAIN H G LATHAM
H G Latham was appointed captain, Lynchburg Artillery, at Lynchburg, Virginia, on 23 April, 1861.

Section: FIRST LT. G S DAVIDSON

Two 6 pounder smoothbores, M1841

Assignment: Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac (See the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac).

Section: SECOND LT. C LEFTWICH

Two 6 pounder smoothbores, M1841

Assignment: Evans' Demi Brigade, Army of the Potomac (See the Evans' Demi Brigade, Army of the Potomac).

Saltville Artillery, Local Defense Troops: Captain W King
Captain W King organised the Saltville Artillery at Saltville, Smyth and Washington Counties, Virginia, in April and May 1864. Assistant Gunner W King was on detached duty and was assigned to command a 32 pounder piece in the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 21 July, 1861 (See the Battalion Heavy Artillery).

Sources

"The companies which arrived here from Lynchburg on Tuesday night, are composed of the right sort of material - stalwart, hardy men, who would fight to the death and never yield to a foe. Our Lynchburg correspondent, in a letter dated April 23d, writes: This morning we witnessed the departure of three of our fine volunteer companies - the Home Guard, Capt. Sunderland; Rifle Grays, Capt. Maurice Langhorne, Jr., and the Lynchburg Artillery, Capt. H. Grey Latham."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 25 April, 1861 - The Lynchburg troops

"The Lynchburg Arillery Company, 7 cannon and other warlike appurtenances, and 130 men, left for the interior yesterday evening, via the Central Railroad. Col. Kershaw's command 2nd Regiment South Carolina volunteers, 1100 men, went on the same train, to the same place."

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 25 May, 1861

"The Howitzer Batteries of Captains Latham and Shields had a target practicing on Saturday evening last.Yesterday Latham's battery was sent to Centreville. "

The Richmond Daily Dispatch, 1 July, 1861 - Camp Pickens, Company "H", Justice to Capt. Boggs & Miscellaneous news

"On our arrival we found the gallant and noble hearted Captain H. G. Latham, of the Lynchburg Artillery, disembarking his battery, part of which came in the preceeding train, and part on a few hours before us; the detention of part of his command being occasioned by acollision of trains near Orange Courthouse, but fortunately no damage was done to his force. Unfortunately several of other commands were killed and disabled."

Contributions to a history of the Richmond Howitzer Battalion: Pamphlet No.1, Part IV, by Carlton McCarthy

"On 21 June Private King was detailed from the battery for several days in supervising the mounting of twenty-four 32-pounder guns on batteries being established at the camp. He missed his battery's deployment on June 25 as they marched to Centreville. King grew to like his assignment a great deal and found the men he worked with (all naval personnel) were hospitable comrades. King's new quarters with the naval detachment consisted of a nice, white canvas house with a raised plank floor, and soft bed and pillow made of about seventy-five pounds of cotton."

The Richmond Fayette, Hampden, Thomas, & Blount's Lynchburg Artilley, First Edition, No.630 of 1000, by R H Moore II

Lynchburg and its people, by W Asbury Christian

A guide to Virginia military organisations 1861-1865, Revised Second Edition by I A Wallace, Jr.

Notes

The Lynchburg Artillery was accepted in state service at Camp Davis, Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, on 23 April, 1861.

Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, to Richmond, Virginia, 23 & 29 April, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Southside Railroad to Richmond, Virginia, in the morning on 23 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the Lynchburg Rifle Greys and the Lynchburg Home Guard (See the 11th Virginia Infantry). The company arrived by the Richmond & Danville Railroad at Richmond via Burkville Junction, Nottoway County, Virginia, in the evening the same day and was stationed at the Baptist College Artillery Barracks, Bush Hill, on the Bush Hill Plank Road, northwest of Richmond, Virginia, under the command of Major General J B Magruder, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 29 April, 1861.

Note: Major General J B Magruder, Provisional Army of Virginia, was assigned to command the artillery in and around Richmond, Virginia, on 29 April, 1861, and the Virginia Forces in and around Richmond, Virginia, on 8 May, 1861. He was appointed colonel, infantry, Confederate States Army, on 21 May, 1861, dated 16 March, 1861, and was assigned to command the District of Yorktown, Department of the Peninsula, on 21 May, 1861. Colonel J B Magruder was appointed brigadier general, Confederate States Army, on 17 June, 1861 (See the 1st Rockbridge Artillery).

Baptist College Artillery Barracks, Bush Hill, on the Bush Hill Plank Road, northwest of Richmond, to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 24-25 May, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was assigned to Colonel J B Magruder, artillery, Confederate States Army, at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.100, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 22 May, 1861, but the ordered was countermanded and was ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.110, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, in the evening on 24 May, 1861, dated the same day. The company was accompanied by the 2nd South Carolina Infantry and arrived by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, in the evening on 25 May, 1861 (See the 2nd South Carolina Infantry).

Note: The Lynchburg Artillery and the 2nd South Carolina Infantry were involved in a collision on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, in the vicinity of Orange Courthouse, Orange Courthouse, Orange County, Virginia, on 25 May, 1861.

General Orders No.25, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, 8 June, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was assigned to the Confederate States by General Orders No.25, Headquarters, Virginia Forces, Richmond, Virginia, on 8 June, 1861, and was accepted in Confederate service on 1 July, 1861.

Special Orders No.51, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, 20 June, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to proceed by the Union Mills Ford Road to Farifax Station, Fairfax County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.51, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861.

Note: The Lynchburg Artillery was assigned to the Third Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Brigadier General D R Jones, by General Orders No.20, Headquarters, Paragraph V, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861 (See the Third Brigade, Army of the Potomac).

Entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, Private & Assistant Gunner W King, 21 June & 21 July, 1861: Private W King, Lynchburg Artillery, was assigned to duty supervising the mounting of twenty-four 32 pounder pieces in the entrenched naval batteries at Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 21 June, 1861, and to command a 32 pounder piece on 21 July, 1861 (See the Battalion Heavy Artillery).

Note: The Lynchburg Artillery was stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the evening on 22 June, 1861.

Manassas Junction, Prince William County, to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, 25 June, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 25 June, 1861, dated 24 June, 1861.

Note: The Lynchburg Artillery was assigned to the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861 (See the 19th Virginia Infantry).

Organisation of Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, 24 June, 1861: The 18th Virginia Infantry, the 19th Virginia Infantry, and the 28th Virginia Infantry were assigned to the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.20, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861; the 30th Virginia Cavalry, Companies A and B, on 22 June, 1861 (See the 30th Virginia Cavalry); the 1st Louisiana Special Battalion Infantry by Special Orders No.61, Paragraph III, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 22 June, 1861 (See the 1st Louisiana Special Battalion Infantry); the Lynchburg Artillery by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861.

Withdrawal to Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, 17 July, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to withdraw to Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, on 17 July, 1861.

Note: A section of the Lynchburg Artillery, under the command of First Lieutenant G H Davidson, was assigned to Evans' Demi Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Major N G Evans, cavlary, Confederate States Army, on 18 July, 1861.

Lewis' Ford & a hill west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, section, 21 July, 1861: A section of the Lynchburg Artillery, under the command of Captain H G Latham, was stationed at Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, and a section, under the command of First Lieutenant G H Davidson, was assigned to Evans' Demi Brigade, Army of the Potomac, on a hill west of the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, in the morning on 21 July, 1861.

Note: Major N G Evans, cavalry, Confederate States Army, was assigned to command the troops at and in the vicinity of Frying Pan Church, on the old Ox Road, Fairfax County, Virginia, as part of the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, on 11 July, 1861 (See the 19th Virginia Infantry). A section of the Lynchburg Artillery, under the command of Captain H G Latham, was stationed at Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, on 21 July, 1861.

Organisation of Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, near Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: The 18th Virginia Infantry, the 19th Virginia Infantry, and the 28th Virginia Infantry were assigned to the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.20, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861; the 30th Virginia Cavalry, Company B, on 22 June, 1861 (See the Hale's Squadron Cavalry); a section of the Lynchburg Artillery by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861; the 49th Virginia Infantry, Companies B, E, and H, and Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry on 18 July, 1861; and the 8th Virginia Infantry, the Madison Cavalry or Invincibles, the Loudoun Cavalry, the 30th Virginia Cavalry, Company D, and the Loudoun Artillery on 19 July, 1861.

After the first battle of Manassas the Lynchburg Artillery was stationed at F Lewis' Farm, a quarter of a mile southwest of Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, in the evening on 21 July, 1861.

F Lewis' Farm, a quarter of a mile southwest of Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, to the Suspension Bridge, on Cub Run, one mile west of Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, 23 July, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to the Suspension Bridge, on Cub Run, by Special orders No.71, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 23 July, 1861, dated 22 July, 1861, and arrived at Camp Suspension Bridge, in the vicinity of the Suspension Bridge, on Cub Run, one mile west of Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, the same day.

Note: The Lynchburg Artillery was assigned to the Fifth Brigade, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, by Special Orders No.169, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 25 July, 1861.

Organisation of Fifth Brigade, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, 25 July, 1861: 18th Virginia Infantry, 19th Virginia Infantry, 28th Virginia Infantry, 49th Virginia Infantry, Lynchburg Artillery

Suspension Bridge, on Cub Run, to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, 11 August, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to Cenreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 11 August, 1861.

Centreville to Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, 29 August, 1861: The Lynchburg Artillery was ordered to Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, on 29 August, 1861, and arrived at Camp Harrison, in the vicinity of Fairfax Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, the same day.

Reorganised at Orange Courthouse, Orange County, Virginia, 3 April, 1862: The Lynchburg Artillery was reorganised, under the command of Captain J Dearing, Jr., at Orange Courthouse, Orange County, Virginia, on 3 April, 1862, and was assigned to the 38th Virginia Battalion Artillery, Company D, under the command of Captain J G Blount, on 23 January, 1863.

Note: The Bedford Light Artillery, under the command of Captain T C Jordon, was disbanded and the men and horses were assigned to the Lynchburg Artillery by Special Orders No.209, Headquarters, Richmond, Virginia, at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, on 4 October, 1862 (See 28th Virginia Infantry).

Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, 9 April, 1865: The Lynchburg Artillery, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel W H Owens, surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Appomattox County, Virginia, on 9 April, 1865.

Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac: Captain P St G Cocke, Powhatan Troop, was appointed brigadier general, Provisional Army of Virginia, at Richmond, Virginia, and assigned to command the military operations of the State of Virginia bounding the Potomac River on 21 April, 1861 (See Headquarters, Army of the Potomac). Brigadier General P St G Cocke, Provisional Army of Virginia, was ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Alexandria, Virginia, the same day and was stationed at the Mansion House Hotel, on Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia, on 22 April, 1861. He was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 7 AM on 28 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the Washington Volunteers, Companies A and B (See the Garrison at Alexandria). Brigadier General P St G Cocke arrived at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 10 AM the same day and was appointed colonel, 19th Virginia Infantry, on 2 May, 1861, dated 21 April, 1861. Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.49, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 19 June, 1861, and was assigned to command the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.20, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861. He was appointed brigadier general, Confederate States Army, on 21 October, 1861, and committed suicide at Belmead, on the James River, nine miles northwest of Powhatan Courthouse, Powhatan County, Virginia, on 26 December, 1861.

Note: Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, was assigned to command the troops from the counties of Rappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Green, Orange, Albemarle, Nelson, Amherst, Campbell, Bedford, Roanoke, Botetourt, and Craig by Special Orders No.39, Paragraph III, Headquarters of the Division, Richmond, Virginia, on 10 May, 1861.

The Lynchburg Artillery was assigned to the Fifth Brigade, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, by Special Orders No.169, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Prince William County, Virginia, on 25 July, 1861.

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.107: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp553-554
Captain H G Latham, section of Lynchburg Artillery

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.113: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp563-564
First Lieutenant G S Davidson, section of Lynchburg Artillery, dated near the Stone Bridge, on Bull Run River, 23 July, 1861

OFFICIAL REPORT: Series I, Volume 51, Part I (Serial No.107), pp24-32
Colonel P St. G Cocke, Confederate States Army, Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, dated Camp Suspension Bridge, near the Suspension Bridge, on Cub Run, 1 August, 1861

Orders of Battle

The above painting, 'The Fourth Alabama', is by Don Troiani, modern America's finest historical artist.