The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac

Mapping the Civil War, featuring rare maps from the Library of Congress, including the position of Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry

Mapping the Civil War, featuring rare maps from the Library of Congress, including the position of Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry

Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry

Arrived at Manassas Junction, Virginia, between 24 May and 5 July, 1861, and stationed near Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, on 21 July, 1861

ACTING MAJOR & CAPTAIN F B SCHAEFFER
Captain F B Schaeffer was appointed acting major, Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861.

Unlettered Company Beauregard Rifles: First Lt. E H Cummins
The company was accepted in state service at Pheonix Hall, on Prince Street, Alexandria, Virginia, on 1 April, 1861, and was mustered in state service for one year at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 1 May, 1861. The company was mustered in Confederate service dated 1 July, 1861, and was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, under the command of Acting Major & Captain F B Schaeffer, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861. First Lieutenant E H Cummins was assigned to command the company during the first battle of Manassas on 21 July, 1861 (See the 17th Virginia Infantry).

Note: Second Lieutenant F B Schaeffer, 3rd United States Artillery, was appointed captain, National Rifles, District of Columbia Militia, in 1860 and his commission was returned to the War Department, Washington, D. C., by Colonel & Inspector General C P Stone, District of Columbia Volunteers, on 6 February, 1861. Captain F B Schaeffer resigned on 12 March, 1861 (See the District of Columbia Militia, Department of Washington).

Unlettered Company Crescent Blues, Company B: CAPT. Mcg C Goodwyn
The company was mustered in Confederate service for the war at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, by First Lieutenant C W Phifer, cavalry, Confederate States Army, on 8 June, 1861, and was ordered to proceed by the New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Railroad to Lynchburg, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861. The company arrived by the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad via Grand Junction, Hardeman and Fayette Counties; Knoxville, Knox County; and Bristol, Sullivan County, Tennessee, at Camp Davis, the Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, at 1 PM on 22 June, 1861. The company was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 4 July, 1861, and was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, under the command of Acting Major & Captain F B Schaeffer, Beauregard Rifles, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861.
Unlettered Company New Market Volunteers: CAPT. H N B WOOD
The company was accepted in state service at New Market, Nelson County, Virginia, on 7 June, 1861, and was mustered in state service for one year at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 11 June, 1861. The company was mustered in Confederate service dated 1 July, 1861, and was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, under the command of Acting Major & Captain F B Schaeffer, Beauregard Rifles, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861 (See the 49th Virginia Infantry).

Sources

"This splendid company, which we have before referred, leaves today for Virginia."

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 17 June, 1861 - Company B, Crescent Blues

"On the morning of the 21st, they were associated with the Beauregard Rifles, a Washington City company, and the New Market Guards, a Virginia company, all under the command of Captain Schaeffer, of the Beauregard Rifles, and ordered to support Latham's Battery a company of Lynchburg Artillery."

"A second and third time the acting Major of the Battalion directed a retreat, stating (so it is said) that the day was lost, and that to remain was to court swift and certain destruction. Captain Goodwyn then remarked that he and his company had come there to fight, and not to retreat, and begged to be permitted to remain. The permission was given, and Captain Goodwyn then called for volunteers. His call responded to by about fifty members of his own company; including Lieutenants Saunders and De Lisle, and a portion of the Beauregard Rifles. The rest of the battalion retired under orders of the commander. Captain Goodwyn and his followers continued to support Latham's Battery until they charged and captured Griffin's Battery (three piece) and turned its guns on the enemy."

"Goodwyn fell in with Col. Kershaw's, South Carolina Regiment, just as it was making the final charge on the enemy, and participated in the pursuit of the flying federalists as far as Centerville."

The Daily Delta, 13 August, 1861 - Jackson Barracks, Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Volume 113, pp10-15

"II. Capt M Goodwin's Company Crescent Blues, Louisiana Volunteers, and Capt H N B Wood's Company Virginia Volunteers, will be temporarily detached and take position at the Stone Bridge across Bull Run, on Centreville Turnpike, and will be reported to Capt F B Schaeffer, who will command the Battalion and give special attention to their military drill, instruction, and discipline."

A Life in letters: Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Hardaway in the Civil War and the New South, 6 July, 1861, Columbus State University

"He inspected the division, thus increased, consisting of the 2nd and 8th South Carolina regiments, the shattered remnants of Hampton's Legion, about 150 strong, whom we had received, (what with the killed, wounded, and those attending them, few were left in the field,) ans one company – partly of Marylanders, and partly of Crescent Blues of New Orleans."

The Rebellion Record: A diary of American events with documents, narratives, illustrative incidents, poetry etc, with twelve portraits of steel, and various maps and diagrams, Second Volume, edited by Frank Moore, author of "Diary of American Revolution"

"We remained long enough to inquire after the Crescent Blues, the fine independent corps commanded by that gallant and accomplished young officer, McGavock Goodwyn. The Blues are now attached to the 49th Virginia regiment, commanded by ex-Governor Smith, of whose gallant conduct in the battle of the 21st General Beauregard speaks in the most glowing terms."

The Daily Delta, 25 August, 1861: Jackson Barracks, Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Volume 113, pp159-160

"The Crescent Blues, we believe, acted as an artillery company, and had charge of a battery".

The Daily Delta, 24 July, 1861 - Jackson Barracks, Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Volume 111, pp130-134

"This company was composed of members of the Pelican Hook and Ladder Fire Company of New Orleans. It went to Virginia unattached and fought at Manassas with two other independent companies. In September, 1861, it was attached for one month to the 49th Virginia Infantry."

Lee's Tigers: The Louisiana Infantry in the Army of Northern Virginia, by Terry L Jones

"The National Rifles of Washington was a District of Columbia Militia Company. Captain Francis B Schaeffer led the majority of his hundred-man company across the river into Virginia service. They became Company F, 1st Virginia Infantry, called the Beauregard Rifles."

Marylanders in the Confederacy, by Daniel D Hartzler

"The Beaureguard Rifles were mustered into the service of Virginia at Camp Pickens on 22 June, and at First Manassas the company was part of a provisional battalion under Captain F B Schaeffer's command. E H Cummins, First Lieutenant, was in command of the Rifles at the time of the battle and their transfer to the 1st Virginia Infantry."

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series, First Virginia Infantry, Third Edition, byL A Wallace, Jr.

"This ink and watercolour manuscript map shows the position of Captain Schaeffer's command at First Bull Run, and brings home the knowledge that the height of the corn, the depth of the river, and the landmark poplar tree all had some effect on the battle."

Captain F B Schaeffer's battalion is illustrated on a hand-wrought copy of a lithogragh based on sketches by Captain S P Mitchell of the 1st Virginia Infantry.

Mapping the Civil War, featuring rare maps from the Library of Congress, by Christopher Nelson

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series, Forty-ninth Virginia Infantry, First Edition, No.547 of 1000, by L Reidenbaugh

Miscellaneous Disbanded Virginia Light Artillery, First Edition, No.372 of 1000, by R H Moore II

A Guide to Louisiana Confederate Military Units 1861-1865, by Arthur W Bergeron, Jr.

A guide to Virginia military organisations 1861-1865, Revised Second Edition, by I A Wallace, Jr.

Notes

Beauregard Rifles

Some former secessionist men of the National Rifles, District of Columbia Militia Infantry, were accepted in state service as the Beauregard Rifles at Pheonix Hall, on Prince Street, Alexandria, Virginia, on 1 April, 1861.

Mustered in one year, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 1 May, 1861: The Beauregard Rifles was mustered in state service for one year at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 1 May, 1861.

Note: The Beauregard Rifles was stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Major G W Brent, Provisional Army of Virginia, on 12 and 18 June, 1861.

Manassas Junction to the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 22 June, 1861: The Beauregard Rifles was ordered to the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, by Special Orders No.61, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 22 June, 1861, and arrived the same day.

Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 6 July, 1861: The Beauregard Rifles was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, under the command of Acting Major & Captain F B Schaeffer, at the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861.

After the first battle of Manassas the Beauregard Rifles, under the command of First Lieutenant E H Cummins, was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, by Special Orders No.150, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 23 July, 1861 (See the 1st Virginia Infantry).

Note: Captain F B Schaeffer, Beauregard Rifles, was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, and the Beauregard Rifles was assigned to the 1st Virginia Infantry, Company F (2nd), by Special Orders No.150, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 23 July, 1861, and was redesignated the 1st (2nd) Virginia Light Artillery, Company C, on 7 September, 1861.

Mustered out, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, 5 & 13 November, 1861: The 1st Virginia Light Artillery, Company C, was discharged by General Orders No.71, Headquarters, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, near Centreville, Farfax County, Virginia, on 5 November, 1861, and was mustered out by First Lieutenant J Pelham, artillery, Confederate States Army, commanding Company C, 1st Virginia Light Artillery, on 13 November, 1861.

Crescent Blues, Company B

The Crescent Blues, Company B, was stationed at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, on 8 June, 1861.

Mustered in duration war, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, 8 June, 1861: The Crescent Blues, Company B, was mustered in Confederate service at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, by First Lieutenant C W Phifer, cavalry, Confederate States Army, on 8 June, 1861.

New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, to Lynchburg, Virginia, 17 June & 4 July, 1861: The Crescent Blues, Company B, was ordered to proceed by the New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Railroad to Lynchburg, Virginia, on 17 June, 1861, and was stationed at Camp Davis, the Fairgrounds, on Fifth Street, two miles west of Lynchburg, Virginia, under the command of Captain R A Hardaway, Independent Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, on 4 July, 1861 (See the Battalion Heavy Artillery).

Lynchburg to Manassas Junction, Virginia, 4-5 July, 1861: The Crescent Blues, Company B, was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 4 July, 1861, and was accompanied by the Independent Alabama Volunteers or Light Infantry, the Madison Artillery or Tips, and the North Sumter Rifles, under the command of Captain R A Hardaway. The company arrived at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, via Charlottesville, Albemarle County, and Gordonsville, Orange County, Virginia, on 5 July, 1861.

Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 6 July, 1861: The Crescent Blues, Company B, was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, under the command of Acting Major & Captain F B Schaeffer, Beauregard Rifles, at the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861.

Note: The Crescent Blues, Company B, was assigned to Colonel W Smith, 49th Virginia Infantry, at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.124, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861 (See the 49th Virginia Infantry).

After the first battle of Manassas the Crescent Blues, Company B, was stationed at Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 5 August, 1861, and was assigned to St Paul's Louisiana Battalion Foot Rifles, Company C, under the command of Major H St Paul, on 1 October, 1861 (See the Washington Battalion Artillery).

New Market Volunteers

Mustered in one year, Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, 11 June, 1861: The New Market Volunteers was mustered in state service for one year at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 11 June, 1861.

Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 6 July, 1861: The New Market Volunteers was assigned to Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry, under the command of Acting Major & Captain F B Schaeffer, Beauregard Rifles, at the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, by Special Orders No.94, Paragraph II, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 6 July, 1861 (See the 49th Virginia Infantry).

Note: The New Market Volunteers was assigned to Colonel W Smith, 49th Virginia Infantry, by Special Orders No.124, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 17 July, 1861.

After the first battle of Manassas the New Market Volunteers was ordered to Manassas Junction, Virginia, in the evening on 21 July, 1861.

Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry

Organisation of Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, near Lewis' Ford, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: The 18th Virginia Infantry, the 19th Virginia Infantry, and the 28th Virginia Infantry were assigned to the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.20, Paragraph V, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861; the 30th Virginia Cavalry, Company B, on 22 June, 1861 (See the Hale's Squadron Cavalry); a section of the Lynchburg Artillery by Special Orders No.64, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 24 June, 1861 (See the Lynchburg Artillery); the 49th Virginia Infantry, Companies B, E, and H, and Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry on 18 July, 1861; and the 8th Virginia Infantry, the Madison Cavalry or Invincibles, the Loudoun Cavalry, the 30th Virginia Cavalry, Company D, and the Loudoun Artillery on 19 July, 1861.

Note: Schaeffer's Battalion Infantry was assigned to the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, under the command of Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, on 18 July, 1861 (See the 19th Virginia Infantry).

Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac: Captain P St G Cocke, Powhatan Troop, was appointed brigadier general, Provisional Army of Virginia, at Richmond, Virginia, and assigned to command the military operations of the State of Virginia bounding the Potomac River on 21 April, 1861 (See Headquarters, Army of the Potomac). Brigadier General P St G Cocke, Provisional Army of Virginia, was ordered to proceed by the Virginia Central Railroad to Alexandria, Virginia, the same day and was stationed at the Mansion House Hotel, on Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia, on 22 April, 1861. He was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 7 AM on 28 April, 1861, and was accompanied by the Washington Volunteers, Companies A and B (See the Garrison at Alexandria). Brigadier General P St G Cocke arrived at Culpeper Courthouse, Culpeper County, Virginia, at 10 AM the same day and was appointed colonel, 19th Virginia Infantry, on 2 May, 1861, dated 21 April, 1861. Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, was ordered to proceed by the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to Manassas Junction, Virginia, by Special Orders No.49, Headquarters, Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 19 June, 1861, and was assigned to command the Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, by General Orders No.20, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp Pickens, near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861. He was appointed brigadier general, Confederate States Army, on 21 October, 1861, and committed suicide at Belmead, on the James River, near Powhatan, Powhatan County, Virginia, on 26 December, 1861.

Note: Colonel P St G Cocke, 19th Virginia Infantry, was assigned to command the troops from the counties of Rappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Green, Orange, Albemarle, Nelson, Amherst, Campbell, Bedford, Roanoke, Botetourt, and Craig by Special Orders No.39, Paragraph III, Headquarters of the Division, Richmond, Virginia, on 10 May, 1861.

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT: Series I, Volume 51, Part I (Serial No.107), pp24-32
Colonel P St. G Cocke, Confederate States Army, Fifth Brigade, Army of the Potomac, dated Camp Suspension Bridge, near the Suspension Bridge, on Cub Run, 1 August, 1861