The Fourth Alabama Painting by Don Troiani

Third Brigade, First Division

Colonel M Corcoran, 69th New York State Militia

Colonel M Corcoran, 69th New York State Militia

Sixty-ninth New York State Militia Infantry

Arrived at Washington, D. C., 4 May, 1861. Mustered in United States service for three months 9 May, 1861

COLONEL M CORCORAN
M Corcoran was appointed colonel, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, on 26 August, 1859, and Captain T F Meagher, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, was assigned as special aid to Colonel M Corcoran during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL R NUGENT
Lieutenant Colonel R Nugent was disabled by a violent fall prior to the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861, and Captian J Haggerty, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company A, was assigned as acting lieutenant colonel during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.

MAJOR A J BAGLEY
A J Bagley was appointed major, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, on 26 August, 1859, and was captured during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.

Company A Irish Fusiliers or National Cadets: CAPT. J HAGGERTY
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and J Haggerty was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company A, on 3 October, 1860. Captain J Haggerty was appointed acting lieutenant colonel, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, and First Lieutenant T Kelly acting captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company A, during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.
Company B: Capt. T Lynch
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and T Lynch was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company B, on 19 January, 1860. First Lieutenant W M Giles, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company B, was appointed acting captain during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.
Company C: CAPT. J CAVANAGH
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and J Cavanagh was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company C, on 13 January, 1859.
Company D: CAPT. T CLARKE
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and T Clarke was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company D, on 14 May, 1860.
Company E: CAPT. P KELLY
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and P Kelly was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company E, on 19 October, 1859.
Company F: CAPT. J BRESLIN
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and J Breslin was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company F, on 9 March, 1858. Captain J Breslin was accidentlaly severely wounded in the right shoulder on 17 July, 1861, and First Lieutenant P Duffy was appointed acting captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company F, during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.
Company G Mechanics Guard: Capt. F Duffy
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and F Duffy was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company G, on 17 October, 1855. Captain F Duffy resigned at Georgetown, D. C., on 17 May, 1861, and First Lieutenant W Butler, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company H, was appointed acting captain during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861. He was appointed captain 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company H, on 14 November, 1861.
Company H: CAPT. CAPT. J KELLY
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861.
Company I: CAPT. J P McIvor
The company was accepted in state service at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861, and J P McIvor was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company I, on 22 April, 1861. The company arrived at Washington, D. C., under the command of First Lieutenant J Coonan, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company I, on 3 May, 1861, and Capatin J P McIvor was captured at the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.
Company K Irish Zouaves: CAPT. T F MEAGHER
The company was organised at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 22 April, 1861, and was accepted in state service on 12 May, 1861. Captain T F Meagher, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, was assigned as special aid to Colonel M Corcoran, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, and First Lieutenant E K Butler, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, was appointed acting captain during the first battle of Bull Run on 21 July, 1861.
Corps Engineers: CAPT J QUINLAN
J Quinlan was appointed captain, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, engineer, on 20 April, 1861.

Sources

"New York 24 April - The eighth, thirteenth, twenty-eighth, and the sixty-ninth regiments, nearly 3,000 strong, embarked yesterday afternoon fron Annapolis, on the steamers Marion, Alabama, and James Adger."

The National Republican, 24 April, 1861 - Departure of troops from New York

"New York 23 April - The Eighth, Thirteenth, Sixty-ninth Regiments, sailed today - the latter accompanied to the pier by about 1,000 recruits forwhom there is yet no means of transportation."

"The steamer Marion sailed at 6 o'clock with the 13th Brooklyn Regiment, and the U.S. brig Perry in tow. The James Adger, with the 69th Regiment, and the Alabama, with the 8th Regiment, sailed at the same time."

The Evening Star, 26 April, 1861

"One company of their regiment arrived here last night from Annapolis, in charge of the regimental baggage. The regiment is expected in today. "

The Evening Star, 1 May, 1861 - Sixty-ninth

"The Sixty-ninth New York regiment, Col. Corcoran, arrived in Washington on Tuesday afternoon, from Annapolis Junction and the road between the Junction and Annapoils, which they have been guarding for the past day or two. This regiment, twelve hundred and fifty strong, came to Annapolis by sea in the steamship James Adgar. "

The Alexandria Gazette, 2 May, 1861 - Washington news

"About two o'clock yesterday morning, three companies of this regiment arrived from Annapolis Junction, and in the afternoon the balance of the men, numbering about seven hundred, came in. "

The National Republican, 4 May, 1861 - Arrival of the Sixty-ninth Regiment

"This famous regiment composed entirely of Irishmen, and numbering fourteen hundred and fifty men, arrived in this city last night at 7 1/2 o'clock. "

The Evening Star, 4 May, 1861 - Sixty-ninth

"The following positions, as nearly as we can learn, are occupied by the northern troops in and around Washington: The 5th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Schwarzwealder, 1,100 men, is quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pinckney, 850 men, is quartered in the City of Washington and at Annapolis. The 7th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lefferts, 1,300 men, is encamped on Prospect Hill, a mile from the White House. The 8th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Lyons, 960 men, occupy the Relay House, and a detachment is also stationed at Annapolis. The 12th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Butterfield, 950 men, is quartered in the City. The 13th Regiment N.Y.S.M. (Brooklyn), Colonel Smith, 1,100 men, is stationed at Annapolis. The 20th Regiment (Ulster) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Pratt, 800 men, is stationed in Washington. The 25th Regiment (Albany) N.Y.S.M., Colonel Bryan, 800 men, is quartered in Washington. The 28th Regiment (Brooklyn) N.Y.S.M., Colonel M. Bennett, 550 men, is quartered in Washington. The 69th Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Corcoran, 1,100 men, is quartered on Georgetown Heights, near the college. The 71st Regiment N.Y.S.M., Colonel Vosburgh, 1,100 men, occupy the Navy yard. They also have control of three boats on the river, manned with 75 men each. The Alexandria bridge is also in charge of the 71st, 150 men stationed on the bridge with three pieces of ordnance. The 1st Regiment Firemen Zouaves (Volunteers), Colonel E. E. Ellsworth, 1,015 men, will soon be encamped on Georgetown Heights. They have been quartered in the Capital. Governor Sprague's Rhode Islanders, Colonel Burnside, 1,100 men, are quartered in the City of Washington. The 6th Regiment Massachusetts occupies the Relay House, nine miles from Baltimore. The 8th Massachusetts Regiment is quartered in Washington. A Regiment of pennsylvania troops is stationed at the Relay House with the Massachusetts 6th and New York 8th, while the remainder is stationed in Washington. The 4th New jersey Regiment has gone into encampment on Merdian Hill, near the camp of the New York 7th. About 2,700 New Jersey soldiers are quartered in Washington."

The Belmont Chronicle (St Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio), 16 May, 1861 - Positions of Northern troops in the South

"The Ohio troops have fallen back to a point on the railroad, about two miles this side of the scene of conflict. At a very early hour this morning, they were joined by the first and second Connecticut regiments, and at nine o'clock this morning the New York sixty-ninth regiment, Col. Corcoran, also marched to the same point. "

The National Republican, 19 June, 1861

"Yesterday, Gen. McDowell ordered the New York Fifth, Twenty-eighth, and Sixty-ninth regiments, to hold themselves in readiness to march at a moment's warning, and at 11 a. m. the Sixty-ninth - 1,100 strond - moved to Ball's Cross Roads, where they found Captain Brackett's company of Second (regular) cavalry, and the battery of the New York Eighth regiment. Col. Corcoran commands his own (the Sixty-ninth) regiment at that point, and the whole force here is commanded by Col. Hunter, of the regular service."

The Evening Star, 21 June, 1861 - Camp Tyler, (Taylor's Tavern,) Fairfax County, Va, 21 June, 1861

"The following regiments compose Col. Sherman's command - Sixty-ninth New York militia, Col. Corcoran; Thirteenth New York volunteers, Col. Quinby; Twenty-eighth New York militia, Col. Bennett; Company B, Second United States cavalry, Lieut. Tompkins; Second Wisconsin volunteers (just attached), Col. Coon."

The New York Herald, 10 July, 1861 - Camp Licoln, N.E. Va., 4 July, 1861

"The New York Sixty-ninth, the Irish regiment, under command of the gallanet Colonel Corcoran, closes its three months' service on the 23 of July."

The Evening Star, 16 July, 1861

"This splendid body of men – presented a very striking appearence, indeed each man being uniformed in a reddisg grey flannel blouse, and having a large forest axe slung over his back. Lieutenants D' Hommergue and McQuade accompanied the Engineers, both being officers of the Corps."

The last days of the 69th in Virginia: A narrative in three parts with a portrait, by Thomas Francis Meagher, Captain Company K (Irish Zouaves)

"When, in May, 1861, the government determined to occupy Arlington Heights and Alexandria, a force of about eight thousand men crossed the river for that purpose, and each command immediately commenced the erection of strong earthworks on their several positions. To the Sixty-ninth was assigned the hill nearest the Aqueduct-Bridge, and commanding the road leading westward to Fairfax Court House."

"In his consultation with Colonel Corcoran – on the day before the Sixty-ninth left New York – Meagher ascertained that, as the 'Brigade Lancers,' (which command was attached to the sixty-ninth,) could not go with the Regiment, there was a vacancy of one company, 'F', to be filled. This was the opportunity Meagher wished for, and he took immediate steps to organise the required company. It had been arranged between himself and Colonel Corcoran that the new company should be designated the 'Irish Zouaves,' and wear the Zouave uniform."

Memoirs of Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher: Comprising the leading events of his career, chronologically arranged, with selections from speeches, lectures and miscellaneous writing, including personal reminiscences, by Michael Cavanagh

"In passing the Sixty-ninth New York regiment, I came up with captain Thomas Francis Meagher, whose Zouave company formed part of it. He was mounted, but wore a plain undress uniform instead of the gorgeous one already described."

Memoirs of Henry Villard, journalist and financier, 1835-1900, in two volumes, Vol. I 1835–1862

"Led by a company of engineers, then drummers and fifers, followed by Corcoran, with the chaplin, doctors, and Meagher, who had been detailed as a special aide, the 69th was finally going to war."

"Sherman's immediate concern, however, was that he might be fired on by the Union soldiers who would be advancing on his right, especially as two of the companies in the 69th were wearing gray uniforms."

Thomas Francis Meagher and the Irish Brigade in the Civil War, by Daniel M Callaghan

"Meagher's men were attired 'most picturesquely' in blue jackets and vests, those of the officers being heavily braided with gold, the non-commissioned officers' and privates' with crimson, the braids being worked into trefoils at the corners and intersections.Meagher's men wore pants of regulation grey, with crimson and gold stripes and their kepis were adorned with the number of the regiment in a wreath of shamrocks."

The Irish Brigade in the Civil War: The 69th New York and other Irish of the Army of the Potomac, by Joseph G Bilby

"In this rough and dangerous pioneering, the Engineers of the 69th, under the command of their high-spirited young Captain, did quick and clear work, splendidly maintaining their character with the regiment for usefulness, promptitude and boldness."

"The line of march was taken up about noon. The corps of engineers led the van, under the command of Captain Quinlan, Lieutenants D'Hommergue and M'Quade, followed by an improvised drum-corps, playing the old familiar inspiriting airs. After these came Colonel Corcoran and staff-officers, including Capatoan T F Meagher, actin as major in place of Major Bagley, who had remained in New York; Captain Haggerty, acting as lieutenant-colonel in place of Colonel Nugent, who had been injured some days previously by a fall form his horse; and Captain J H Nugent, acting as adjutant."

The Irish Brigade and its campaigns: With some account of the Corcoran Legion, and sketches of the principle officers, by David Power Conyngham

"This fort was named in honor of Lieutenant Colonel James Haggerty of the 69th New York State Militia, who died of wounds received at the First Battle of Bull Run (Manassas)."

"This fort was named for Colonel Micheal Corcoran of the 69th New York State Militia, whose soldiers constructed the fort in May 1861. Fort Corcoran, with its auxillary works Forts Bennett and Haggerty, was established to secure the Virginia emnd of the Aqueduct Bridge and to provide points of support for the Union Army."

Mr Lincoln's forts: A guide to the Civil War defenses of Washington D. C., New Edition, by Benjamin F Cooling II and Walton H Owen II

New York in the War of Rebellion, 1861-1865, Volume 1, by Frederick Phisterer

James Haggerty of Tìr Conaill, Irish patriot, American hero, by James H McLaughlin (Historian, County Donegal Association of New, Inc.)

Notes

The 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and I, were accepted in state service for three months at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 20 April, 1861.

Note: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to rendezvous at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, under the call for 75,000 troops to serve three months by President A Lincoln on 15 April, 1861.

Special Orders, Headquarters, 69th New York State Militia, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 22 April, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K (cavalry), under the command of Captain E Reilly, was not ordered to Washington, D. C., on 23 April, 1861, and was assigned to the Regimental Armory, on Lexington Avenue, between Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth Streets, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, and other duties, under the command of Major J Bagley, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, by Special Orders, Headquarters, 69th New York State Militia, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, on 22 April, 1861.

Note: Major J Bagley, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, and Captain J B Kirker, engineer, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, were attending regimental business at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, between 23 April and 11 May, 1861.

Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 23-26 April, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry (1,050) was ordered to proceed by the steamer James Adger to Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at Pier No.4, on the Hudson or North River, at 6 PM on 23 April, 1861, and arrived by Chesapeake Bay on 26 April, 1861. The regiment disembarked at Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in the morning the same day.

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, 27-28 April, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad to Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, on 27 April, 1861, and arrived at 5.30 PM on 28 April, 1861. The regiment was assigned to guard the Annapolis & Elkridge Railroad between Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, and Annapolis Junction, Howard County, as far as Paint Branch Bridge, on the Paint Branch River, near Beltsville, Prince George's County, Maryland, between 28 April and 3 May, 1861.

Note: Colonel M Corcoran, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, set up headquarters at Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, at 5.30 PM on 28 April, 1861, and a detachment of twenty-seven men of the 5th Massachusetts Infantry, Company H, under the command of First Lieutenant K Stark, was stationed at Patuxent Iron Works, on the Little Patuxent River, near Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, on 29 April, 1861 (See the 5th Massachusetts Infantry).

Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, to Washington, D. C., 2-3 May, 1861: Three companies of the 69th New York State Militia Infantry were ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Washington, D. C., in the evening on 2 May, 1861, and arrived at 2 AM on 3 May, 1861. Seven companies of the 69th New York State Militia Infantry were ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Washington, D. C., in the evening the same day and arrived at 7.30 PM on 3 May, 1861.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at Annapolis Junction, Howard County, Maryland, in the evening on 3 May, 1861 (See the Three Months' Volunteers, Department of Annapolis).

Columbia Market, on the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue, & the Constitution Office, on E Street, between Eleventh & Twelfth Streets, Washington, D. C., 3 May, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was stationed at Columbia Market, on the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue, and the Constitution Office, on E Street, between Eleventh and Twelfth Streets, Washington, D. C., on 3 May, 1861.

Note: Seven companies of the 69th New York State Militia Infantry were stationed at a building on the corner of Thirteenth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, and Hall's old coachmakers and three companies at Coyle's iron building, opposite the Washington building, Washington, D. C., on 4 May, 1861.

Building on the corner of Thirteenth Street & Pennsylvania Avenue; Hall's old coachmakers; & Coyle's iron building, opposite the Washington building, Washington, to Georgetown College, on Warren Street, Georgetown, D. C., 4 May, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Georgetown College, on Warren Street, Georgetown, D. C., in the afternoon on 4 May, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., 9 May, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was mustered in United States service for three months at Washington, D. C., by Brevet Major (First Lieutenant) & Assistant Adjutant General I McDowell, United States Army, on 9 May, 1861.

Note: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, under the command of Captain T Lynch, Company B, and three hundred recruits, under the command of Major A J Bagley, were ordered to Washington, D. C., on 22 May, 1861, and arrived by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railraod, at Washington, D. C., at 12 PM on 23 May, 1861. The company was ordered to Georgetown College, on Warren Street, Georgetown D. C., the same day.

Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., 22 May, 1861: Major General C W Sandford, New York Militia, was ordered to assume immediate command of all the regiments of his State within the District of Columbia, and to report directly to general headquarters by Special Orders No.89 1/2, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., on 22 May, 1861.

Occupation of Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, & Alexandria, Virginia, 24 May, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered across the Potomac River at the Aqueduct Bridge, Georgetwon, D. C., at 2 AM on 24 May, 1861, and arrived at Camp Corcoran, near the Georgetown & Falls Church Road, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, the same day (See the Occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria).

Note: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to build Fort Corcoran, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 24 May, 1861, and was originally known as Fort Seward in honor of Secretary of State W H Seaward (See the United States Corps Engineers).

General Orders No.1, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Alexandria, Virginia, 28 May, 1861: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, the 28th New York State Militia Infantry, the 69th New York State Militia Infantry, and other troops or detachments in his vicinity were assigned to Colonel D Hunter, 3rd United States Cavalry, by General Orders No.1, Paragraph IV, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Alexandria, Virginia, on 28 May, 1861.

Mustered in three months, Washington, D. C., Company K, 31 May, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, was mustered in United States service for three months at Camp Corcoran, near Ross' House, on the Georgetown & Falls Church Road, Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 31 May, 1861.

Order No.1, Headquarters, Brigade of the Aqueduct, Ross' House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, 30 May, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Aqueduct Brigade, under the command of Colonel D Hunter, 3rd United States Cavalry, by Order No.1, Headquarters, Brigade of the Aqueduct, Ross' House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 May, 1861.

Note: The 5th New York State Militia Infantry, the 28th New York State Militia Infantry, and the 69th New York State Militia Infantry and other troops or detachments in the vicinity not otherwise assigned were assigned to the Aqueduct Brigade, under the command of Colonel D Hunter, 3rd United States Cavalry, by Order No.1, Headquarters, Brigade of the Aqueduct, Ross' House, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 May, 1861 (See the 28th New York State Militia Infantry).

Farr's Crossroads, Fairfax County, & Ball's Crossroads, Alexandria County, Virginia, 18-20 June, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Farr's Crossroads, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 9 AM on 18 June, 1861, and to Ball's Crossroads, Alexandria County, Virginia, at 11 AM on 20 June, 1861.

Note: Varian's Light Artillery and the 2nd United States Cavalry, Company B, were stationed at Ball's Crossroads, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 20 June, 1861.

Special Orders No.16, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, 30 June, 1861: Colonel W T Sherman, 13th United States Infantry, was assigned to command the 69th New York State Militia Infantry by Special Orders No.16, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 June, 1861 (See the Third Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army).

General Orders No.13, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, 8 July, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was assigned to the Third Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army, under the command of Colonel W T Sherman, 13th United States Infantry, by General Orders No.13, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 8 July, 1861.

Advance to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, 16-18 July, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Vienna, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 2 PM on 16 July, 1861, and arrived via Falls Church and Old Courthouse, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the evening the same day. The regiment was ordered to Germantown, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 5.30 AM on 17 July, 1861, and arrived via Flint Hill, Fairfax County, Virginia, the same day. The 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 7 AM on 18 July, 1861, and arrived by the Warrenton Turnpike in the morning the same day.

Blackburn's Ford, on the Bull Run River, 18 July, 1861: The 69th New State Militia was in reserve during the skirmish at Blackburn's Ford, on the Bull Run River, between 12 PM and 4 PM on 18 July, 1861, and arrived near the Warrenton Turnpike, one mile south of Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, in the evening the same day.

Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, to the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, 21 July, 1861: The 69th New State Militia Infantry was ordered to proceed by the Warrenton Turnpike to the Stone Bridge, on the Bull Run River, at 2.30 AM on 21 July, 1861, and arrived between 5 and 6 AM the same day.

Retreat to Washington D. C., 21-22 July, 1861: After the first battle of Bull Run the 69th New York State Militia Infantry was ordered to Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia, at 4 PM on 21 July, 1861, and proceeded to Washington, D. C., at 12 AM on 22 July, 1861. The regiment arrived near Fort Corcoran, Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, via Vienna, Fairfax County, Virginia, under the command of Acting Major & Captain T F Meagher, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company K, at 12 PM the same day.

Fort Corcoran, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, 24 & 25 July, 1861: The 69th New State Militia Infantry was stationed at Fort Corcoran, on Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 24 July, 1861, and at Georgetown College, on Warren Street, Georgetown, D. C., at 12 AM on 25 July, 1861.

Mustered out, Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, 3 August, 1861: The 69th New York State Militia Infantry, under the command of Senior Captain J Kelly, 69th New York State Militia Infantry, Company E, was ordered to proceed by the Washington Branch, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 1 PM on 25 July, 1861, and arrived by the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railroad at Harve De Grace, Harford County, Maryland, at 5 PM the same day. The regiment arrived at Manhattan (New York County), New York City, New York, at 6 AM on 27 July, 1861, and was mustered out on 3 August, 1861.

Colonel W T Sherman, 13th United States Infantry, Third Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army: W T Sherman proceeded to St Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri, on 27 March, 1861, and was appointed colonel, 13th United States Infantry, by General Orders No.33, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 18 June, 1861, dated 14 May, 1861. Colonel W T Sherman, 13th United States Infantry, was assigned to inspection duty at Washington, D. C., between 20 and 29 June, 1861, and was assigned to command the Third Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army, by Special Orders No.16, Headquarters, Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington, Alexandria County, Virginia, on 30 June, 1861. He was appointed brigadier general, United States Volunteers, by General Orders No.62, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., on 22 August, 1861, dated 17 May, 1861.

Reports

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.26: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp371-372
Captain J Kelly, Sixty-ninth New York State Militia Infantry, dated Fort Corcoran, Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, 24 July, 1861

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.25: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp368-371
Colonel W T Sherman, Thirteenth United States Infantry, Third Brigade, First Division, McDowell's Army, dated Fort Corcoran, Arlington Heights, Alexandria County, Virginia, 25 July, 1861

OFFICIAL REPORT NO.16: Series I, Volume 2 (Serial No.2), Chapter IX, pp348-352
Brigadier General D Tyler, Connecticut Volunteers, First Division, McDowell's Army, dated Washington, D. C., 27 July, 1861